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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (7 posts)

What do you grow in your backyard garden?

  1. donnaisabella profile image80
    donnaisabellaposted 6 years ago

    What do you grow in your backyard garden?

    I love gardening, would you share some pictures?

  2. profile image0
    Sunnie Dayposted 6 years ago

    We grow corn, green beans, peppers, cilantro, onions, tomatoes, peas, cucumbers, lettuce, spinach, squash, kale, and herbs such a basil, oregano, rosemary and galic chives...Right now we have only Kale and onions growing..We hope to start planting the end of March..This is one of my hubs and has a couple pictures of the garden..If you send me your email I will attach some more pictures..I love gardening..last summer the heat burned so much up but we were able to can and freeze alot.. thank goodness

    http://sunnieday.hubpages.com/hub/Proac … Hard-Times

  3. Naima Manal profile image73
    Naima Manalposted 6 years ago

    I like to grow squashes, lettuce, radishes, tomatoes, white corn, eggplant, okra, broccoli, bell peppers, mustard greens, collard greens, kale, spinach, several herbs, and I know I'm missing something. Since it's winter, we only have peppermint and thyme growing outside. I am looking forward to planting in the spring, and thanks for asking.

  4. ShootersCenter profile image73
    ShootersCenterposted 6 years ago

    Tomatoes, corn, strawberries, squash, peppers of all types, okra, and eggplant. Right now I have just tomatoes and strawberries finishing up but I'm fixing to start everything new again on the full moon.

  5. MickS profile image70
    MickSposted 6 years ago

    Vegetables, a small, flower garden.

  6. chspublish profile image80
    chspublishposted 6 years ago

    Unfortunately I don't have a back garden, at the moment. I make do with an allotment, not too far away. The growing period starts in February and ends in August, so there is only a very short season for most things. In this temperate climate some vegetables need many months to reach maturity and can last through the winter period if there in not too much frost and ice on the ground.
    Things to grow for the longer season are carrots, potatoes (early and main) - cabbages, brussel sprouts, leeks, onions, parsnips, swedes and others to name but a few.
    Traditionally grown were the potatoes, onions, sprouts, kale, carrots, parsnips and cabbages. Lettuces and other greens needing the warmth were grown in the summer.
    All that changed when people adopted plastic tunnels and greenhouses on a wider scale and could prepare seedlings in advance of the season, so that tomatoes - suitable for outdoors - would get a 'quick' start and the short warm season wouldn't stunt their growth. I can attest to this, unless, the cherry/bush or trailing variety are grown, the usual upright type will not reach full maturity by September.
    So to answer the question, what I now do is a combination of cloche or plastic tunnel grown variety - cucumber, early squash/courgette, aubergine, peppers, tomatoes, melons.
    Fruit that grows well outdoors - strawberries, raspberries, blackcurrants, apples, some pear varieties and some cherries, (if the weather is warm). I had a fig tree that grew and produced well - what a treat!
    Outdoor is a mixture of the longer season vegetables - named above - and the quickly grown plants - chard family, the squashes, lettuces, outdoor bush tomatoes, (started under plastic, but lovely flavor if finished outdoors), herbs, early onions, bean varieties, corn, (if the weather is warm), broccoli and the many companion flowers that benefit the veg growth.
    Thanks for the question. Love the vegetables.

  7. aisha91 profile image58
    aisha91posted 6 years ago

    For me, growing vegetables in the backyard is a sense of fulfillment that gives inner peace on my being. I don't know for others but when I plant I contemplate more and ponder more on the life that I have. I became more grateful on the good life whom God gives me and learned more on different adversities I've experienced. Hence, planting can be a good absorber of our negatives feelings and a good hobby to pursue everyday.

 
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