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jump to last post 1-10 of 10 discussions (10 posts)

Are you tired about all of the news stories about tiny homes?

  1. davidlivermore profile image98
    davidlivermoreposted 3 years ago

    Are you tired about all of the news stories about tiny homes?

    I keep reading stories about "incredibly small homes" and "these people spent a month in a small home".  I'm tired of these stories.  There are those who don't have a home or live in a small home because it's not their choice.  America (and other wealthy nations) really should not think this is some mind blowing idea.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12120772_f260.jpg

  2. DreamerMeg profile image90
    DreamerMegposted 3 years ago

    No, I enjoy reading about the tiny homes because I find the incredibly creative way in which everything is packed in very interesting. I agree that there are those who don't have a home and who might love to have the chance to live in one of these, or those who need a bigger home than they currently have. The tiny homes allow for less usage of power and resources, thus leaving a smaller footprint on the earth. They may also be a way of working out how to provide more affordable homes for everyone.

  3. Robert the Bruce profile image60
    Robert the Bruceposted 3 years ago

    I think the point of these tiny houses is that we should all try to avoid wasting resources. While I wouldn't want to live in a house that small, having a large house filled with useless crap that I bought seems to be a worse alternative.

    If people would be content with less material possessions, I think they would be happier, and certainly wealthier.

  4. Diana Lee profile image82
    Diana Leeposted 3 years ago

    I love looking at these stories and watching them build the tiny houses on the television shows.  We really don't need all the space we are packing full of stuff we don't really need. "Less is more" could be the answer to the housing problems.

  5. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 3 years ago

    Where I don't see small homes as a novel idea, I am actually glad to see the recent interest in them because it's a positive step in the right direction. Large homes for small families are wasteful. Also, these compact living spaces are real options for those who have been unable to afford home ownership.

  6. peeples profile image95
    peeplesposted 3 years ago

    I enjoy hearing about it because I like the idea of us becoming less reliant on huge homes and ridiculous amounts of possessions. I think that these stories actually help your beliefs. I don't believe anyone really thinks it's a new concept. There are people who HAVE to live in a small home or are homeless, but these homes can actually help them. I have seen articles where people built multiple small homes on one lot. Really nice ones, and then let homeless people have them.
    What does bother me though are the stories of these homes costing $25,000 +. For that price in my area you can buy a full size home with 1/4 acre lot. Logically I don't understand spending so much on such a small thing.

  7. liesl5858 profile image87
    liesl5858posted 3 years ago

    I think the idea of a small home is appealing rather than having a big home full of junks and unused materials being stored in case you need them but you never do. Small homes are ideal for first time buyers who can't afford big homes. And also easy to keep clean and tidy.

  8. RTalloni profile image88
    RTalloniposted 3 years ago

    Promotion of the tiny home concept benefits wealthy societies because it shows people that there is merit in not spending all their time, energy, emotion, and money in gaining, maintaining, and retaining large homes and items to go in them.  It also helps people understand the enslaving, confining, restricting, consuming effect of not being free of things.  Freeing oneself from the care of stuff means freedom to "do" and "go" and build relationships in the processes.  Not everyone can live this freely, but those who can are more free than the rest.

    You are certainly right about this not being some new idea, though.  Many in the USA who are reclaiming the right to live free are going back to early American cabin designs that had some fabulously creative ways to use spaces, as well as gleaning ideas from historical European living that is still being utilized today.  There are modern twists to the designs that can run the costs up to amazing amounts, but that is not necessary to reaching the goal of reducing the weight of care that comes with large homes and large amounts of stuff.

  9. tirelesstraveler profile image80
    tirelesstravelerposted 3 years ago

    I am fascinated by tiny homes.  Nonetheless I think the majority of people who live/sell them are disingenuous or delusional . I watched a video of one that was parked in a friends yard.  How realistic is that for the average person? The only tiny house I have seen with a bathroom had a "generous 26 inch shower".
    Everyone selling tiny houses talk about simplifying and only have a few items of clothing. All good if you have time to do laundry every other day, But with a tiny house you have to go to the laundry which everyone has time to do three times a week.   Where do they keep their snow boarding clothes? Snowboard or skies?  What if they want to entertain during the winter? Where is the storage unit? Where is their family that they don't need more than two chairs in the house?
    I think I actually need to see someone living in one to be convinced.
    Now sometime back there were houses called "I houses" or was it "Eye" houses.  They were conventional homes of about 450 square feet, I think that makes more sense. I am simplifying, but lets be honest, how many can successfully let go of 95% of their belongings?   That could be a challenge, but I would have to let go of my techie husband and a dog. Not going to happen.

  10. littlecat2013 profile image88
    littlecat2013posted 3 years ago

    I am very tired of these stories. They were interesting at first but the longer it's gone on the more I haven't enjoyed them. When I buy a house I want a big one with lots of rooms. I like having lots of space. I don't want to live in a tiny house, shipping container, and dumpster like some college professor I keep reading about. I lived in a VW bus for a summer and so little space is not always fun. You might save money but you can't sprawl out or avoid other people you live with for privacy time. Give me a big 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom house any day.

 
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