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What to do with squashes, how do I preserve them

  1. Louis Taylor profile image60
    Louis Taylorposted 7 years ago

    Hi,

    The squashes are ripe here, and they always get rotten by Christmas because of the humid whetaher here, cannot really store them in a dry place. Anyone has experience in freezing them, or other methods please? I would love to make a bit of pumpkin pie with my home grown veggies at Christmas smile
    Thanks

  2. EmpressFelicity profile image77
    EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago

    I don't have any suggestions about preserving squash myself, but you might be able to find something here:

    http://www.pickyourown.org/allaboutcanning.htm

    I have to confess I've never eaten squash (despite being a great veggie lover).  But if it's anything like courgettes/zucchini in taste and texture, then you could make squash ratatouille and then freeze it. This would be a great way to use up your tomatoes too if you've got a glut of them.

  3. habee profile image97
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    I have a hub about it.

    1. Louis Taylor profile image60
      Louis Taylorposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Could you please post a link to it, cannot find it myself sad Thanks!!

      1. Granny's House profile image67
        Granny's Houseposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I would either cut up and freeze or cook and put through a food mill or grate on a grater. Make sure they are freezer bags!

  4. h.a.borcich profile image60
    h.a.borcichposted 7 years ago

    With squash you can cut them up like pumpkins, boil the pieces, peel the skin off, then put them trhough a colander before freezing in bags or containers. I grow butternut and acorn squash.

    1. Ivorwen profile image75
      Ivorwenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      This is what my sister does with hers.  Then she has squash ready to serve and use in recipes.

  5. tobey100 profile image60
    tobey100posted 7 years ago

    Here 'bouts we wash 'em.  Slice 'em about an 1/8th inch thick.  Boil for one minute.  Cool.  Place in quart or gallon freezer bag.  Freeze.  Never had any problems with longevity or taste.  Quite simple.

  6. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
    SomewayOuttaHereposted 7 years ago

    ...why not make the pumpkin pie filling and can it?

    1. tobey100 profile image60
      tobey100posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Now I haven't thought of that.  It would work wouldn't it???

      1. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
        SomewayOuttaHereposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        sure it would...i used to can all kinds of stuff for the winter...and freeze berries so i have them on  hand to.

  7. mega1 profile image81
    mega1posted 7 years ago

    If you have lots of room in your freezer you can just take the seeds out, peel and cut in cubes and freeze in freezer bags, or better yet get a Foodsaver and vacuum seal in freezer bags, it will keep a long, long, time that way.  The vacuum sealing is so great - I can buy bulk food so cheap and freeze it, meat, veggies, everything!  I even make soup and sauces, freeze first and then vac seal in these heavy bags.  If you have lots of garden produce to store, its a wise investment.  You can even make some pies and freeze them too!  now I'm hungry

    1. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
      SomewayOuttaHereposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      ...made me hungry too.....dropping by to say 'hi' Mega!

  8. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 7 years ago

    If you grow your own produce, you definitely need a separate freezer. That way you can store a lot of veggies with  minimum hassle I should say. Why do you need to spend a lot of time canning things(that not very healthy for regular consumption)? You just freeze everything in convenient packages and voila! You need one - you have it. Work once - eat all winter.

  9. relache profile image90
    relacheposted 7 years ago

    The strategy for squash at my house is to make soup and freeze it.

  10. Ben Evans profile image73
    Ben Evansposted 7 years ago

    Squash (not just zucchini) makes really good sweet breads.  It can be substituted into a zucchini recipe.  They actually have quite a good taste and can be mixed with carrots and other vegetables like cucumbers for making breads.

    They also make very good yeast (non sweet) breads.

    1. georgepattenson profile image61
      georgepattensonposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Dead easy... dice, boil, let cool and freeze.  Most Squashes will last for a year in the freezer.
      George

 
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