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jump to last post 1-21 of 21 discussions (45 posts)

Do you care if, as of August, there is no longer Saturday mail delivery in the

  1. xstatic profile image60
    xstaticposted 5 years ago

    Do you care if, as of August,  there is no longer Saturday mail delivery in the US?

    The PO has said they will stop Saturday mail delivery in August, 2013. It sounds like a good money saver to me. They will still deliver packages.

  2. profile image0
    Old Poolmanposted 5 years ago

    As far as I am concerned, they should have done this years ago.  Other than packages, most of my mail is bills and advertising anyhow.  They could go to once or twice a week delivery for all I care.  For packages, I much prefer UPS.  Their package tracking actually works.  With USPS tracking I sometimes get the tracking update two or three days after I have received the package.  The Postal Service would be well served to hire some experienced people from UPS or FedEx if they ever hope to operate in the black.

  3. moonfroth profile image73
    moonfrothposted 5 years ago

    Old Poolman pretty well summed it up.  The private courier companies in Canada have had a huge impact on Canada Post and forced that Corporation to think and act competitively.  House delivery on ANY day is becoming a dim memory--neighbourhood cluster boxes are now the norm.  Saturday delivery is gone.  If you really want rapid delivery you can register or double-register your correspondence, and for a nominal fee.  The U.S. needs a national postal service, and if peeling delivery back by a day--or more-is a necessary cost-cut, I say they shoud go for it.-

    1. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The truth is that we really don't know how much it costs to mail a letter here in the USA.  We think it is the price of a postage stamp, but after the annual losses made up out of taxpayer money, the true cost could be many times the postage.

  4. CroftRoan profile image80
    CroftRoanposted 5 years ago

    I hardly ever get mail so the less times the Post Office delivers the better. Like Old Poolman said, most the mail that we get is advertising and bills. It's about time they made an official decision on the Saturday delivery.

  5. wayne barrett profile image72
    wayne barrettposted 5 years ago

    I could live without it. There will be those who disagree, but if sacrifice is necessary to achieve better service and more savings then it is the intelligent thing to do. We will still receive our packages and our garbage cans won't fill up as quickly with junk mail.

  6. phdast7 profile image84
    phdast7posted 5 years ago

    Good Question.   I am glad they will be eliminating Saturday delivery except for packages.   Its a money-saving change that is long, long overdue.   

    But to go a step further, what about this?   About ten years ago when the PO was announcing its losses, I announced to everyone who would listen that we ought to get realistic about costs and needs.   My clever and completely ignored recommendation?   Three day a week service for everyone, individuals and businesses. 

    Half of us would get our mail on Mon, Wed, Fri. and the other half on Tues, Thur,  Sat.  Setting up split schedules and routes would not be insurmountably difficult.   And what about twice a week delivery in rural areas where homes may be miles apart.? 

    And while I  am it?   Why is there no outcry against the discounted mailing costs extended to businesses and bulk mailers?    The cost of delivering the mail is the cost of delivering the mail.   Eliminating the federal government's subsidy of mailing costs for businesses and corporations would go a long way toward moving the Post Office toward the black.   

    This is not rocket science, just common sense.   smile    But who in Congress has the strength of character and determination to see such legislation to a successful conclusion?   Where are the good leaders....the ones more concerned about the needs of the people, that their own wants?

  7. duffsmom profile image60
    duffsmomposted 5 years ago

    It doesn't bother me. In fact, they could deliver every other day as far as I am concerned.  If it significantly saves money I am all for it though I doubt it will keep postage rates lower.

  8. Jackie Lynnley profile image90
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 5 years ago

    I agree. I know it will put some out of work but what else is new? The postal is bound to hurt with internet and they must adjust. Look how much time they have wasted, and money. Why extend the inevitable?

    1. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      They could actually go to every other day delivery, keep Saturday, and get rid of half the employees.  But they still would never make a profit because they don't know how.

    2. Jackie Lynnley profile image90
      Jackie Lynnleyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You got that right.

  9. lburmaster profile image83
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    Not really. It will help me remember to only get mail on days I work. That way I don't walk to the mail box on Sundays then come home looking like a fool again!

    1. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You too?

  10. Little Grandmommy profile image60
    Little Grandmommyposted 5 years ago

    I don't mind if there is no Saturday delivery.  If it saves money and keeps them from raising the postage rates every time we turn around, it works for me.

    1. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It is really interesting that no so far cares, but some Republican congress members are terribly upset.

    2. cat on a soapbox profile image98
      cat on a soapboxposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is a glaring example of how out-of-touch our politicians in Washington are.

  11. Faith Reaper profile image86
    Faith Reaperposted 5 years ago

    Oh, shoot no, I don't mind waiting until Monday to get that medical bill in the mail!

  12. Historicus profile image60
    Historicusposted 5 years ago

    To save money, I think it is a good idea.  As long as post offices are open until noon.

    1. Cook n Save Money profile image77
      Cook n Save Moneyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I live in a rural community.  My post office, which is 15 miles away, isn't open on Saturdays now, and has limited M-F hours.  I'm an ebay seller and I was wondering if they'll still schedule package pickups as well as simply delivering packages.

    2. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good question Cook n Save Money, I ahve not seen anything about that.

  13. lone77star profile image83
    lone77starposted 5 years ago

    I seem to remember when they suspended Saturday delivery back in the late 50's. I remember that postage was something like 3 cents, too.

    With email and FedEx, the post office is a thing of the past.

    And since I've lived overseas for the last 5 years, it's not going to bother me one bit.

  14. Angela Kane profile image77
    Angela Kaneposted 5 years ago

    No I do not care too much that mail will not be delivered on Saturdays. We can still receive packages and any mail that comes on Saturdays can come on Monday or Tuesday if Monday is a holiday. We don't get mail on Sundays and it hasn't hurt at all.

  15. MarieAlana1 profile image71
    MarieAlana1posted 5 years ago

    I definitely care. I usually get my bills the day they are due. Not having Saturday mail delivery would make my mail even later.

    1. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Perhaps you might contact the companies that mail the bills to you and ask that they send them sooner?

    2. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is an unusual circustance alright. Any chance of paying online to avoid the problem?

    3. MarieAlana1 profile image71
      MarieAlana1posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've tried everythng. The companies won't send them early and are not online.

    4. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If the bills are always the same amount, it is fairly easy to set up auto-pay through your bank.  I would not be all that concerned about paying any bill I received in the mail on the very day it was due.  Pretty bad business for the company.

  16. cat on a soapbox profile image98
    cat on a soapboxposted 5 years ago

    No, I wouldn't miss Saturday mail delivery, but the postman will have a heavier load to carry and deliver on Monday. I'd much rather lose a day than see another hike in postage stamps.

    1. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Me too!

    2. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Unless the Postal Service cleans up their act and starts operating like a business, it won't matter how much they charge for stamps, they will never make a profit.

  17. profile image0
    Deb Welchposted 5 years ago

    No, it does not bother me.  If you rent a PO Box - you will still receive your Saturday mail - they are now pushing that idea at check-out.  The postal carrier will have a huge load on Monday - now.  If Monday is Holiday - then the Carrier will have a super large load to tote.  All that 'junk mail' could use some upgrading and change.  Maybe they should change some guidleines in format - send to an e-mail,text msg,post cards sent out or a one 8x12 sheet folded thrice is better than a ton of stuffed envelopes that people toss as soon as they lay eyes on them.  All that paper!  I thought we were trying to conserve the use of paper?

  18. RBJ33 profile image60
    RBJ33posted 5 years ago

    It was proven that the post office would have had a $1.3 billion surplus in 2012 if it weren't for the Republican backed law that requires the post office to fund 75 years of pensions in just 10 years - costing the PO tons of money and making it unprofitable.  The Saturday issue shouldn't be an issue if the law was changed.  No other entity in the US has this requirement - why is that?

    1. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Excellent question. I had forgotten about that ploy.

    2. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      First I heard about this.  Those damn Republicans.

    3. RBJ33 profile image60
      RBJ33posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It is suggested that the reason is to drive the PO out of business so they can privatize it.  Is that good or bad?

    4. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not sure, but you can bet it would be expensive and all the workers would be part-time, no benefits, I'll bet...

    5. RBJ33 profile image60
      RBJ33posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Another corporation to scam us.

    6. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      A privatized Postal Service would stop taking money from the tax payers to make up losses, and join the list of Corporations giving large campaign contributions for political favors.  Which is worse?  Maybe we should leave it alone.

    7. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There was a letter to the editor in this morning's (02/11/13) that asked the same question and pointed out also that the PO is the largest employer of returning veterans and goes where even UPS and FedEx do not..

    8. profile image0
      Old Poolmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      An excellent point about the area they cover for delivery.  Perhaps they just need to hire someone who understands business to run the operation.

  19. profile image60
    Woodpecker27posted 5 years ago

    Not really, you'll get it on Monday, but a two day span is a while... especially if its an important letter, maybe skipping Wednesday or Thursday would be better...  Besides, this is the age of e-mail and mail is really just for bills and magazines now, so no I don't care.

  20. JimTxMiller profile image78
    JimTxMillerposted 5 years ago

    Ol' Ben Franklin must be buying rounds for all the fathers right about now, thrilled to see that their sons and daughters have come to their senses!

  21. profile image0
    ViolinByCourtneyposted 5 years ago

    I care for the sake of jobs that will be lost, but I also believe we should have started phasing out the Post Office at least a decade ago rather than investing time, money, and research trying to save it. If we had phased it out and just not replaced employees as they retire or are otherwise terminated and closed offices as they became severely staffed, it might have been possible to relocate employees rather than firing them or cutting their pay and schedules.

    1. xstatic profile image60
      xstaticposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      True too, the human cost and the unemplyment coud be a problem.

    2. profile image0
      ViolinByCourtneyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That was supposed to be "severely understaffed."

 
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