Roy Moore: Last Time America Was 'Great' Was During 'Slavery'

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  1. Paul Winngert profile image61
    Paul Winngertposted 7 months ago
    1. Randy Godwin profile image93
      Randy Godwinposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      Another fine quote from a great religious American. tongue

    2. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

      I saw the article and am appalled, let us now hear from the "right wing" peanut gallery, I expect the silence to be deafening.

      1. PrettyPanther profile image86
        PrettyPantherposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        As you can see in another thread, it is being decried as "fake news."  That's all they have, because they can't dispute it on the merits without looking like idiots.

      2. dianetrotter profile image70
        dianetrotterposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        I was dared to provide an audio or video of the slime ball.  I was able to conveniently access one since it is all over so-called fake news.

        1. Credence2 profile image79
          Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, Diane, you did, but just as well have not as the excuses are still coming from the usual 'doubting  thomases'. 

          I guess that they will now accuse the venerable LA Times now of faking Moore's voice?

          I won't necessarily call the statement racist, but anyone who can put that utterly barbaric period of American History on a pedestal is not the kind of man I want in a leadership position. Things were only 'good' for white Anglo Saxon families. Where does he get the gall to make such a response to a AA that posed the question? Was it intended to be an underhanded slight?

          1. dianetrotter profile image70
            dianetrotterposted 7 months agoin reply to this

            To an AA, EXACTLY!  Something similar happened when he was addressing a group (I believe Berkley law students) about the crime in the inner city.  I don't want to try to restate what he said but he belittled the person who asked the question.

            Meanwhile, back at the plantation,

            Sense of family
            1.  Slaveowners, their sons and friends raped the female slaves,
            2.  It was adultery,
            3.  Inhumane treated in considering them animals,
            4.  hypocrisy of being "Christians" and doing all of the above
            5.  Slaves were worked hard early morning to late evening, they got 1 pair of shoes for the year

            Roy Moore doesn't know Jack shinola about "family" during that period.

            Getting upset, over and out!

            1. Credence2 profile image79
              Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

              Moore speaks from the cuff, with a lack of depth commonly found in rightwing thought. Before his statements about who were better off or who was great relative to something or someone else perhaps a little empathy might be in order about all the others that were not included in his vision of a period of relative utopia for America.

  2. PrettyPanther profile image86
    PrettyPantherposted 7 months ago

    Roy Moore's sexual assault of young girls has overshadowed his nutjob positions on other issues.  He has equated homosexuality with bestiality and thinks it should be illegal.  He said Muslims should not be allowed to serve in Congress, and he thinks Obama isn't an American citizen.

    He is unfit to serve, just like his highest-level supporter who besmirches the presidency.

  3. Castlepaloma profile image77
    Castlepalomaposted 7 months ago

    America was only great for whites. Times will change as they done in ancient pass.

  4. GA Anderson profile image79
    GA Andersonposted 7 months ago

    You folks better be careful. You could break an ankle jumping on spin like that.

    Here are some recent headlines:
    Roy Moore: Last Time America Was 'Great' Was During 'Slavery

    Roy Moore: America Was Great During Slavery

    Roy Moore: America was great in era of slavery, is now 'focus of evil in ..

    Roy Moore Believes America Was Great During Slavery.


    etc. etc.  - Google News search results.

    Except for this one anomaly:

    Roy Moore: America “was great at the time when families were united ... from Vox.com

    Can anyone be faulted for drawing the conclusion that Roy Moore thought slavery made America great? I mean, if you only read the headlines, and don't bother with the details.

    In another conversation someone chided another poster for using that Pelosi sound-bite: `We have to pass the bill to see what is in it' - pointing out that the context of its initial use belied the intent of the poster''s use of it. Would you folks consider it reasonable to apply the same consideration to Roy Moore's quote?

    Here is Mr. Moore's response, with what I think are the contextual points of his remark bolded:

    " Moore responded: "I think it was great at the time when families were united—even though we had slavery—they cared for one another… Our families were strong, our country had a direction."

    It seems that the slavery phrase was a time marker, and the "...even though..." descriptor sure seems to imply he didn't think slavery was a good thing - after all he used it to separate slavery from the good things he mentioned; families united, cared about one another, families were strong, country had a direction.

    If that statement had not been time-stamped with the slavery era phrase, would the same statement carry your taken meaning that Roy Moore thought slavery was a part of America's greatness? That seems, to me, to be the inference of those headlines I noted - and the comments in this thread so far.

    Geesh! Cover your eyes and throw a dart. No matter who you hit it seems you get the same squeal. Y'all got soot on your hands.

    GA

    1. Randy Godwin profile image93
      Randy Godwinposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      Gee whiz, GA! I expected better of you than that. There's no getting around his referencing the slave era. Nor that he wasn't taking in consideration what the slave families were going through at the time. A callous, bigoted statement if I've ever heard one!

      1. GA Anderson profile image79
        GA Andersonposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        Hi Randy,

        I guess it is too bad for me that I just stumbled across an audio of his comments - thanks to Diane, in another thread - because it makes me even more sure of my interpretation.

        It turns out the slavery phrase was a bit more than just a time stamp, it was also noted as a problem we overcame.

        Contrary to your assertion, I didn't draw any inference to slave families from his comments.

        Have a listen for yourself. Even listening with your prejudiced perspective, I think you will have to do a lot of twisting to find support for your interpretation of what he meant.

        Audio of Roy Moore's "When was America great" comments"

        With hopes of keeping you from jumping to any more wrong conclusions, understand that I am not defending Moore, or his idea of when America was great, I am just commenting on the BS spin that has been put to his remarks.

        Also, I can only hope that your "A callous, bigoted statement..." remark was in reference to Moore's statement, because if it was directed at my statement; rather than just saying you disagree - then I will gladly offer to help you place it in a tight sun-deprived place.

        GA

        1. Randy Godwin profile image93
          Randy Godwinposted 7 months agoin reply to this

          Ha GA, no I was not directing that criticism at you. Good reply re the "if" though. It's after two in the morning here and I just saw your reply. I'll check out the audio tomorrow and get back to you. Good Night.

    2. PrettyPanther profile image86
      PrettyPantherposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      Here is my take, copied and pasted from another thread:

      "First, I would wonder what makes him think families were more united then?  Obviously, he wasn't alive at that time, so where does this idea come from?

      But, no, I have no reason to believe families were more united during the time of slavery.  In fact, families were torn apart because of slavery."

      I think it is fair and I stand by it, even though I  acknowledge your point has merit.

      1. GA Anderson profile image79
        GA Andersonposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        Don't fall out of your chair PrettyPanther, but I agree with you. I wasn't agreeing with his statement, I was just commenting on the obvious spin, and the glee of those that so quickly jumped onboard.

        As I am sure you will see - in my response to Randy, the audio of his comment sounds to me like a confirmation of my original response.

        Here is the audio recording Diane posted in another thread:

        Audio of Roy Moore's "When was America great" comments

        What do you think?

        GA

        1. PrettyPanther profile image86
          PrettyPantherposted 7 months agoin reply to this

          I think you have a point, but I will say this. Which families were he talking about? I doubt that many Americans of color would agree that families were more united at that time. And, I know you will probably think I am being unfair, but he then uses language common to racists who say that slaves, on the whole, had it pretty good, and that current black family culture is dysfunctional because of their inherent shortcomings which lead them to commit more crime, abandon their families, etc. If it were someone who had never before exhibited racist leanings, I could easily give him a pass, but given the questioner was black, and he unnecessarily threw in the reference to slavery, it is not much of a stretch to interpret his remarks as harking back to a  time when he thought whites  had it better and blacks were taken care of

          All that said, I agree that it's possible he didn't mean all of that, which is why I limited my original statement on the matter.

          1. GA Anderson profile image79
            GA Andersonposted 7 months agoin reply to this

            I am going to stop with my original point PrettyPanther. Anything more would begin to look like I was defending the man.

            Considering what little I know of Roy Moore, I can see him envisioning a scenario of the, (as another poster called it), the 'ante bellum' times of the pre-civil war South.

            That is what prompted my first comment - not the truth of the thought or character of the man.

            GA

            1. PrettyPanther profile image86
              PrettyPantherposted 7 months agoin reply to this

              I understand. You were introducing fairness into the debate, which I agree was needed.

              1. GA Anderson profile image79
                GA Andersonposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                Nope PrettyPanther, not me. I don't deal in fairness. I was just searching for a discussion to participate in, and found this thread's low hanging fruit. I just thought I would help it along a bit. ;-)

                GA

    3. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

      You have to admit outside of your interesting point, that is was rather a stupid thing for Moore to say.

      My view is identical   to that of the Panther in this matter.

      So, America was at its greatest while a section of the nation was free to own people and while Native Americans were brutally driven across the continent?

      1. GA Anderson profile image79
        GA Andersonposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        Hi Cred, Apparently my comment was misconstrued as agreement with Moore's statement. To the contrary, I also agree with PrettyPanther. Although I do think Moore's criteria was correct; the family and direction stuff, but I would more likely place that time period in the early post-WWII era.

        My point was all about the spin used to generate the headlines and interpretations dominating the news, and, (*ahem) certain ideologically-minded folks commenting in this thread.

        I posted Diane's audio link a couple times already. Check it out and see what you think after listening to the full remarks - not just that one sound-bite.

        GA

        1. Credence2 profile image79
          Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

          GA, we do agree that America's at its most preeminent was during a handful of years after WWII.

          As I mentioned to Diane, Moore's comment while not racist bordered on insensitive at best. If this man saw the nation in a sense of togetherness during this historically contentious period (before 1860) when so many were excluded, it sends me the wrong message as he does not truly know what it is that is going to bring people together TODAY, reaffirming all the negative opinions I have about the man.

          1. wilderness profile image96
            wildernessposted 7 months agoin reply to this

            I think I would put it during the war, not after.  Thinking of millions of young men leaving their wives, children and friends to die on foreign soil to protect the country and people and to help the friends they had never seen.  Thinking of women that suddenly changed their entire culture, their very concept of what a woman was and what a woman did to do heavy manufacturing jobs.  Thinking of children that went without in order to provide for the war effort, that saved their pennies and contributed rather than buy a candy.  The elderly that rose from their rocking chairs to do what they could.

            The people, all of them, came together in a way that we would not see until 911 and at a level that we have not seen at all since that war.

            1. PrettyPanther profile image86
              PrettyPantherposted 7 months agoin reply to this

              Of course, you are referring to the white people of that era.

              1. wilderness profile image96
                wildernessposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                You don't think black people fought in the war?  Or black women worked the factories?  You don't think black kids saved a penny to contribute?

                While I wasn't there, I would have to disagree, and I know black men joined the army - I've read of a group of black pilots.

                1. dianetrotter profile image70
                  dianetrotterposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                  Good point Wilderness!

                  Why African-American Soldiers Saw World War II as a Two-Front Battle
                  Drawing the connection between fascism abroad and hate at home, pre-Civil Rights activists declared the necessity of “double victory”

                  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/ … 180964616/

                  1. wilderness profile image96
                    wildernessposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                    I very highly doubt that black soldiers saw WWII as a two front battle.  I doubt that the black "Rosie the Riveteer" did either - between working long, physically demanding shifts and coming home to care for the kids she would not have had the time or energy.

                    On the other hand, the civil rights activists with time on their hands most certainly did, just as the first sentence of the link says.

                2. PrettyPanther profile image86
                  PrettyPantherposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                  I misunderstood and thought you were referring to the Civil War era. My bad.

                  1. wilderness profile image96
                    wildernessposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                    Oh no!  Although black men did fight in the war (on both sides) I don't know that women, children or the elderly blacks made any change.

                    Does explain your comment, though - I questioned your sanity for a moment! big_smile

                3. colorfulone profile image83
                  colorfuloneposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                  The Tuskegee Airmen.  I wrote a hub about Tuskegee Airman Joseph Gomer.  They were segregated in the military, and thought to be less capable pilots than whites, but they showed them all what they could do in the air and became heroes in their own right. 

                  I never met Mr. Gomer but would love to have had the honor, but my sister knew him and his wife.  Pure gold!

                  1. wilderness profile image96
                    wildernessposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                    Yes, that's the group.

                4. Credence2 profile image79
                  Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

                  Yes, black folks fought in the war and participated in the ultimate struggle to defeat the Axis Powers.

                  Those pilots you refer to were known as the Tuskegee Airman, they accumulated quite a record of successful close air support of our bombers.

            2. Credence2 profile image79
              Credence2posted 7 months agoin reply to this

              A point well taken, I have seen the old photos of people virtually standing in lines waiting to volunteer as soon after FDR declares war as a result of Pearl Harbor. I can't imagine that happening today short of a direct attack upon American soil. Who is going to make these kinds of sacrifices today in the face of these current manufactured wars and conflicts. But America was at its greatest power in the period after the US had the "bomb" for a least a few years before the USSR exploded theirs. It was second to none the only economy that was functional immediately after the war. And all of us did not necessarily have a unified view in regards to 9-11 as to the provocation, the cause nor the appropriate response, not like Pearl Harbor.

              1. wilderness profile image96
                wildernessposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                Yes, we were certainly the "greatest power" after the war, not when we entered it.  Still, it takes more than raw power, massive destructive forces, to be great.  Or so I see it.

  5. ahorseback profile image77
    ahorsebackposted 7 months ago

    Anyone watching the Moore polling ?    Maybe voters are smart enough to wait for the verdict from the trial before determining a mans guilt !

 
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