What is with Republicans and Obesity, can someone explain this trend?

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  1. Jewels profile image83
    Jewelsposted 9 years ago

    Of the 15 fattest states of America, 12 voted Republican in the 2008 presidential election:

    1 Mississippi: 32.5%
    2 Alabama: 31.2%
    3 West Virginia: 31.1%
    4 Tennessee: 30.2%
    5 South Carolina: 29.7%
    6 Oklahoma: 29.5%
    7 Kentucky: 29.0%
    8 Louisiana: 28.9%
    9 Michigan: 28.8%
    10 -11 Arkansas and Ohio: 28.6%
    12 North Carolina: 28.3%
    13 Missouri: 28.1%
    14 -15 Georgia and Texas: 27.9%

    The 3 blue states were Ohio, North Carolina and Michigan.
    It also works in reverse: if you take the 15 'leanest' states, only 3 or 4 voted Republican.

    Interested in your thoughts on this.

    1. profile image0
      Writer Riderposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe republicans don't believe in healthy living along with saving the environment.

      1. girly_girl09 profile image75
        girly_girl09posted 9 years agoin reply to this

        Sorry...not this republican. wink See my 15+ hubs on healthy eating/recipes and healthy exercise and ways to slow down global warming at home.

      2. profile image0
        Writer Riderposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        There are exceptions of course, but the question is why the epidemic among states. It makes sense that they would rebel against values democrats hold dear.

    2. Harvey Stelman profile image60
      Harvey Stelmanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Ask Ted Kennedy!

  2. profile image0
    fierycjposted 9 years ago

    Its in the policking principle. They only care about their own damn stomach! Lol.

    1. Jewels profile image83
      Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      lol

  3. Lisa HW profile image66
    Lisa HWposted 9 years ago

    I'm going guess Republicans are more stressed out by "the way things are" than Democrats are?  Stress leads to food cravings.

    To go with that theory, or as a separate one, Democrats are often either very wealthy (as in Hollywood) or else on Welfare or in low-income jobs.  The wealthy ones aren't stressed out when it comes to paying bills and coming up with what they need.  The Welfare ones don't have any money to eat.  The low-income ones don't either.  A lot of Republicans are low-middle, middle-middle, and upper-middle income.  They're the ones who end up taking home their jobs (as opposed to punching out and forgetting about them).  In spite of all their efforts at doing the right thing and creating a decent home environment for their families, they're taxed to the point of feeling like low-income people.  In other words, low-income people often have nothing but don't work as hard for it.  Middle-income people work hard for their nothing.

    Another part of the theory:  Middle-income people may feel like they have nothing; but the difference between them and low-income people is that they usually have enough to eat.  Yet another part of the theory, a lot of Republicans aim for traditional family lifestyles, which means kids, aiming to save for college, not a lot of time for going socializing (so a lot of staying home, renting movies, and maybe seeing pizza, Chinese food, fast food, and prepackaged foods.

    Well, that's the only theory I can come up with.   Not saying it's correct - just doing my best at guessing.

    1. Jewels profile image83
      Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Stressed or given up?  Interestingly stress can often create loss of weight and not gaining of weight. In which case in the above form of statistics, and your comments Republicans should have lost weight and not gained it.

  4. HealthCare Basics profile image59
    HealthCare Basicsposted 9 years ago

    Americans are getting larger per year, but interesting that you have seen a correlation of parties.....  smile

    You might want to look at normal dietary intake to those parts of the country too...... South tends to eat more fried foods maybe???

  5. Tyson Ellis profile image33
    Tyson Ellisposted 9 years ago

    I don't know guys, I hope no one is confusing 'correlation' with 'cause and effect'. I don't know that people in those states are fatter because they are Republicans.

    Are they fat because they are Republicans or are they Republicans because they are fat?

    I live in a small city, close to a big city. In the big city there are more police than in my small city. There is also more crime in that big city. Would this mean that more police leads to more crime?

    1. Jewels profile image83
      Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Regardless it is an interesting observation, and perhaps there is a connection.

  6. Keith S profile image61
    Keith Sposted 9 years ago

    aha, but take a look at the high school drop out rates of states like NY, IL, Michigan, Mass, etc who voted democrat.

    I guess if you are implying that Repubs are fat, then the evidence speaks for what demos are.

    1. HealthCare Basics profile image59
      HealthCare Basicsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe look at jobless rates and the need to find work as opposed to school...... I know, not good, but a possibility and not related to party lines, especially at that age (highschool).

      1. Jewels profile image83
        Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        As of May 2009 this is the unemployment rate in brackets.  The US unemployment rate is 9.4.

        1 Mississippi: 32.5    (9.6)
        2 Alabama: 31.2%    (9.8)
        3 West Virginia: 31.1%    (8.6)
        4 Tennessee: 30.2%    (10.7)
        5 South Carolina: 29.7%    (12.1)
        6 Oklahoma: 29.5%    (6.3)
        7 Kentucky: 29.0%    (10.6)
        8 Louisiana: 28.9%    (6.6)
        9 Michigan: 28.8%    (14.1)
        10 -11 Arkansas and Ohio: 28.6%    (7.0, 10.8)
        12 North Carolina: 28.3%    (11.1)
        13 Missouri: 28.1%    (9.0)
        14 -15 Georgia and Texas: 27.9%    (9.7, 7.1)

        1. girly_girl09 profile image75
          girly_girl09posted 9 years agoin reply to this

          -----------------

          This data is from April:

          http://wnd.com/images/090523employmentstats.jpg

          Just trying to keep things fair and balanced, guys. wink

          Signed,

          A (non-obese) republican.

          1. tksensei profile image61
            tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            Keep up the good work, sister!

          2. Capable Woman profile image60
            Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, but the Slurpy machines will always need cleaning, etc. Jobs and quality jobs are 2 different things. I'm not debating this point, though...the whole country is effed right now in regards to the unemployment rate. Yet and still...blue collar southerners with less than average education still overwhelmingly vote republican. I just find it fascinating how the paradigm shifted, basically, since Reagan.

            1. tksensei profile image61
              tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              The way you are thinking is why the Democrats won't hold on to the majorities they now enjoy.

              1. Capable Woman profile image60
                Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                I'm not thinking about this any particular way other than the way it is... I am merely pointing out a truth.

                Democrat used to = working class, blue collar backbone of the country people.
                Republican used to = rich white guys.

                Now, Democrat = elitist liberal and Republican = rural xenophobe.
                (both examples being somewhat hyperbolic for the sake of illustrating my point).

                What changed?

                1. tksensei profile image61
                  tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                  The generalities and prejudices you are choosing to accept.

                  1. Capable Woman profile image60
                    Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                    So you're saying that these "generalities" are not true?

                    By the way, I have no prejudices whatsoever... again, I am only pointing out that which is obvious to those paying any sort of attention during the last few major elections.

                    Statistics are easily manipulated, but facts are not.

                  2. Jewels profile image83
                    Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                    Is it a perception in the States that Republicans = wealthy and Democrates = working class?  Or is it the other way around.  I'm interested in perception here as well.

            2. girly_girl09 profile image75
              girly_girl09posted 9 years agoin reply to this

              What I was trying to prove with that data is that Republicans and Obesity and Democrats and Unemployment are basically inconclusive. wink Some red states have low obesity rates, some blue states have lower unemployment rates.

              While it seems that many red states have high obese rates and many blue states have high unemployment rates, what can we prove by these sets of data? Not a whole lot. We'd have to spend a lot of time and a lot of money getting more conclusive data.

              Anyone can twist and turn statistics to suit any issue. Unfortunately it's done a lot; by both sides.

              There are so many factors and yes, I agree the whole country is 'effed' right now in regards to the unemployment rate as well as the obesity rate.

              1. Jewels profile image83
                Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                I brought in the stats of unemployment as it was mentioned in an earlier post.  It didn't sway against Republicans and obesity at all.  I should have pointed that out.  So really unemployment could be ruled out.  Perhaps it's education?  (And pleased you don't have the obesity problem.)

    2. Jewels profile image83
      Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Well the thread is really about obesity and the coincidence that the majority of states that came out as the most obese happened to be Republican.  Are you saying Democrates are dropouts but are not fat?  Not sure what you mean here.

      Is there a connection between obesity and being a Republican.  Very generalized statement but there must something not right with the union here.

  7. Capable Woman profile image60
    Capable Womanposted 9 years ago

    And isn't it funny that those republican voting states are also some of the poorest, both economically and education-wise?

    What ever happened to the "Dixie-Crats"? When did Voting republican become synonymous with being a poor, rural, xenophobic southerner?

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Never.

    2. Jewels profile image83
      Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      That does seem to be a valid statement, and why is this the case.  Do republican states not look after the welfare of their citizens through education and health?

      1. tksensei profile image61
        tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        LOL! A truly telling question!

      2. profile image0
        Leta Sposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        One of the best explanations of why poor and rural areas turned Red can be found in Thomas Frank's "What's the Matter with Kansas," 2004.  I'm sure it is a combination of factors taken into correlation with a few others.

  8. Mighty Mom profile image82
    Mighty Momposted 9 years ago

    Blue states tend to be more educated. Here's a breakdown of precenctage of population that is college educated. Education does correlate to lifestyle, including food consumption.


    Percentage college graduates for each state appear below:
    State Population 25+
    (thousands)     % bachelors degree
    Alabama 2,948            22.7
    Alaska 383               24.0
    Arizona 3,441            26.0
    Arkansas 1,743           17.4
    California 21,990        29.8
    Colorado 2,894           36.0
    Connecticut 2,232        33.5
    Delaware 531             28.1
    District of Columbia 404 46.4
    Florida 11,266           25.8
    Georgia 5,468            25.0
    Hawaii 796               27.0
    Idaho 795                22.5
    Illinois 8,031           28.1
    Indiana 3,972            22.2
    Iowa 1,891               24.6
    Kansas 1,693             31.0
    Kentucky 2,673           21.3
    Louisiana 2,763          22.3
    Maine 882                23.7
    Maryland 3,545           37.2
    Massachusetts 4,415      37.6
    Michigan 6,330           23.3
    Minnesota 3,323          32.7
    Mississippi 1,742        19.3
    Missouri 3,637           26.6
    Montana 600              24.9
    Nebraska 1,077           26.8
    Nevada 1,356             21.2
    New Hampshire 865        34.0
    New Jersey 5,740         33.4
    New Mexico 1,154         23.7
    New York 12,636          29.6
    North Carolina 5,409     23.8
    North Dakota 420         25.2
    Ohio 7,304               25.0
    Oklahoma 2,214           24.3
    Oregon 2,315             26.4
    Pennsylvania 8,277       24.8
    Rhode Island 713         27.6
    South Carolina 2,591     22.3
    South Dakota 465         23.9
    Tennessee 3,700          23.5
    Texas 13,231             24.7
    Utah 1,272               28.4
    Vermont 423              31.3
    Virginia 4,623           34.2
    Washington 3,884         28.8
    West Virginia 1,222      15.3
    Wisconsin 3,585          24.1
    Wyoming 321              20.7


    Source: Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the 2003 Current Population Survey

    Other rankings and top 10 lists

  9. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 9 years ago

    Concerning the defection of the working class/poor (which has been pointed out here as basically the 'fat') to the Republican party, Frank suggests that the political discourse of recent decades has dramatically shifted to one in which "explosive" cultural issues, such as abortion and gay marriage, are being used to redirect anger towards "liberal elites."

    In the book, he describes the rise of neoconservatism and the so-called far right in the social and political landscape of Kansas (representative of the poor/rural he is talking about across America...he is from Kansas). He finds extraordinary irony in working-class Kansans' overwhelming support for Republican politicians, despite belief that the economic policies of the Republican party are wreaking havoc on their communities and livelihoods for the benefit of the extremely wealthy. Meanwhile, he says, the party fails to deliver on the "moral" social issues (such as abortion and gay rights that they buy into) which brought their support in the first place -- deepening a cycle of frustration and confusion--all which is then cycled back to blaming liberalism.

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      And those same issues aren't 'used' by the left to "redirect anger" in the other direction? I thought you'd said you'd been to college. Own a TV? Go to the movies?

      ...the hypocrisy...

      1. profile image0
        Leta Sposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        You are 'arguing' (such as you do) with ideas largely taken from a book by a columnist for the Wall Street Journal who has a PHd in History from the University of Chicago.

        The book is available at your local library.  Why don't you go for a visit?

        1. tksensei profile image61
          tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          What?! "a columnist for the Wall Street Journal who has a PHd in History from the University of Chicago"?! What was I thinking? Such a person couldn't possibly have a political bias! How dare I question such a sage?

          roll




          And those same issues aren't 'used' by the left to "redirect anger" in the other direction? I thought you'd said you'd been to college. Own a TV? Go to the movies?

          ...the hypocrisy...

          1. profile image0
            Leta Sposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            You turned it personal (as usual), stating that I didn't go to college or have seen TV, etc.  Hence, the logical answer to your pathetic tactic was to deflect it. 

            Go away, TK.  You really are out of your league, you know. 

            edit*..Btw, do you know who Karl Rove is?

            1. tksensei profile image61
              tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              I didn't 'state' that. In fact, I noted that you had claimed such experiences and therefore I would have expected you to be familiar with them. Reading skills are fundamental, you know.

              1. profile image0
                Leta Sposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                You turned it personal.  That is a fact.  And I assume you do not know who Karl Rove is. 

                Bye bye, now.  These ladies are gonna eat you alive.

                1. tksensei profile image61
                  tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                  You seem to be very big on ridiculous assumptions.

            2. tksensei profile image61
              tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              Garsh no, I ain't never hurd o' him!


              roll

            3. tksensei profile image61
              tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              roll

              And what "league" would that be?

          2. Jewels profile image83
            Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            Often people write with a bias however, doesn't stop a viewpoint from being published.  These states have a high level of obesity and something is causing it.  So there is an underlying issue here.  This writer sees a discord going on and perhaps he's onto something.

            Voters are usually swayed by emotion, would you agree tk?  Candidates certainly like stirring it.  No doubt people are p*ssed off. Why are these states eating so much?

            1. tksensei profile image61
              tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              They sure do.

    2. Capable Woman profile image60
      Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      That reminds me of the gubernatorial race in GA. a few years back wherein Georgians elected their first republican governor since The Reconstruction (Sonny Purdue). The big wedge issue was the state flag... the ol' "stars and bars" of the Confederacy or something new and less offensive to certain groups.

      The state legislature had already made the decision to go with a new flag and the "southern heritage" crowd was losing their minds...Purdue ran on a platform of "let Georgians vote on it"...and he got elected for, essentially, that reason.

      Guess what happened the minute he got in office... That's right, he said "eff that, we ain't voting" (or words to that effect).

      Meanwhile screw education, unemployment, taxation, civil rights for everyone and all those other issues that are way less important than keeping the confederate battle flag flying over a state that is more than 58% African-American.

      My last name is Lithuanian so what do I care (other than having to live here)? ...I couldn't help but laugh.

      1. tksensei profile image61
        tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        Did anyone say those exact words? If any other issue on the left or right is raised that falls outside those specific areas does that mean anyone addressing said issue is basically saying "screw education, unemployment, taxation, civil rights"?

        1. Jewels profile image83
          Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          Is it moral?

          1. tksensei profile image61
            tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            Is what moral? And, you didn't answer my questions.

            1. Capable Woman profile image60
              Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              No to my knowledge, no one had the courage to say those exact words, however the fact that we elected the first republican governor since the reconstruction speaks to SOMETHING. And the flag issue was super hot. It was all Candidate Purdue talked about.

              You should have seen all the "No votes for turncoats" bumper stickers when he went up for re-election. Too late and too bad for the sons of the confederacy...the repub's have their toe hold here now.

              1. tksensei profile image61
                tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                Ah, they 'didn't have the courage' but YOU know what they were REALLY thinking and feeling, right? More mind reading?

                And of course if someone were to raise an issue about, say, public health or traffic safety they would REALLY be saying "screw education, unemployment, taxation, civil rights"? You've set up a rather narrow band of acceptable topics for state government.

                1. Capable Woman profile image60
                  Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                  No, just more living in the state, observing my environment, watching the news, reading the paper (both news items, editorials and letters to the editor), talking to my associates, friends and neighbors, paying attention and using basic critical thinking to arrive at reasonable hypotheses.

                  What criteria do you use to evaluate your reality?

                  1. girly_girl09 profile image75
                    girly_girl09posted 9 years agoin reply to this

                    I've g2g to bed (omg it's so late now lol), but if so many people were discontent with Republicans in GA, how come there was such a HUGE turnout for the last run-off election for Saxby? It was only so close on November 4th because of Obama's GOTV efforts (incredible, might I add). But, in December, the Obama camp wasn't around and the democrats didn't get out to vote for Saxby's opponent, thus not getting rid of a GOP Senator when they had a chance.

                  2. tksensei profile image61
                    tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                    Many of the same, but I try to recognize my OPINIONS for what they are.

            2. Jewels profile image83
              Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              Sorry, I didn't think you asked me a question.  And I should have said morale.

              I'm really at the mercy of the US citizens here.  I asked the question to learn.  Am not judging or taking sides here.  I thought it was an interesting statistic and would be good to be addressed.  I wonder if the governors of those states are seeing this as an issue.  Is it an issue of the Governor of the state?  Who helps the people change the pandemic (obesity could be put in that category in my opinion.)

              I'm hoping to learn something from the discussion.

      2. profile image0
        Leta Sposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        Must have taken that little number right out of Karl Rove's play book.  And I don't think there is really a question that these kind of tactics have dominated the Republican party since at least the late 80's.  That isn't hypocritical or false, either, just because it isn't giving 'equal play' to the other side...just an evaluation of the trends.  Which is why the Repubs are in the position they are in right now.

  10. meetbrandon profile image78
    meetbrandonposted 9 years ago

    While I cannot give you any solid information, I can also tell you unfortunately that the faith-based community also suffers from battle with the bulge.

    I think, on behalf of the church folks, it has to do with "religion" rather than "relationship" being the focus of churches, and as a result, people feel pressure they aren't "Christian" enough and as a result, turn to the comfort foods.

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, and every other community in a country where lifestyles have become more sedentary and many have poor dietary habits. It's not a political or religious thing (I can't believe this needs to be said).

      1. Jewels profile image83
        Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        So it's just plain coincidence that the large majority of these states are Republican?

        1. meetbrandon profile image78
          meetbrandonposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          Coincidence? I think not.

        2. tksensei profile image61
          tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          *sigh*

          Do you have a breakdown of the obese in each state according to declared political affiliation?



          roll

          1. Jewels profile image83
            Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            lol *sigh*  We humans!

    2. Jewels profile image83
      Jewelsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      That's interesting.  Are these States synonomous with the Bible belt Brandon?  So what you say here equals low self esteem - not stacking up.

  11. meetbrandon profile image78
    meetbrandonposted 9 years ago

    Um, meow.
    God bless you, TK.

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Did you just "meow"?

      1. meetbrandon profile image78
        meetbrandonposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        Yes. Thanks for asking.

        1. tksensei profile image61
          tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          Um, ok then...

  12. meetbrandon profile image78
    meetbrandonposted 9 years ago

    TK, what's the deal? Don't treat people like they are stupid; you don't even know me.

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      You just 'meowed.' How would you expect to be treated?

  13. meetbrandon profile image78
    meetbrandonposted 9 years ago

    Like a human being. But, I guess that's too much to ask.

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      But, but humans don't 'meow.'

  14. nicomp profile image65
    nicompposted 9 years ago

    Government at the state level of Mississippi has been overwhelmingly Democrat for over 100 years. I believe the governor has been a Democrat since about 1850, until a Republican was elected in 2000 and again in 2008.

    You also need to look at the number of eligible voters compared to the number who turned out for the election. I suggest the voters represent a minority of the total number of over-18 citizens that live in the state.

  15. profile image0
    DarwinsLaureateposted 9 years ago

    I think a lot of Republicans view that obesity is like throwing on a Star of David patch.

    The other things many I've spoken to fear is what role it would play on nationalized health care..

    ..would you want to pay money to someone who in all likelihood could see a dramatic health difference if they ate less?

    These aren't my thoughts, but they are incites to republican friends of mine.

 
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Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)