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jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (15 posts)

What gives us the right to describe a person as ugly when we have never created

  1. PK2010 profile image79
    PK2010posted 7 years ago

    What gives us the right to describe a person as ugly when we have never created a human being?

  2. DanielBing1 profile image74
    DanielBing1posted 7 years ago

    The same right you have to describe a car as being ugly without having ever built an automobile.

  3. profile image52
    RagnarLodbrokposted 7 years ago

    People create human beings all the time.  It's called procreation otherwise known as "when the guy knocks up his girlfriend."

  4. CarltheCritic1291 profile image73
    CarltheCritic1291posted 7 years ago

    Well, we are free to have our own opinions, but just because we have that freedom doesn't mean we should use it. I am not saying it is right to call someone ugly, because to do that is really mean, and I think that we can not judge a person based on appearances.
    Physical beauty means nothing, but true beauty comes from within. I hope this helps answer your question, it is a good one and I am glad you asked it.

  5. literal profile image56
    literalposted 7 years ago

    Those type of people are too short-sighted and insensitive to consider others.  And they probably think that through 'natural selection' they will create a superior, good-looking race.

  6. Manna in the wild profile image69
    Manna in the wildposted 7 years ago

    There are two kinds of ugly. Those who conform to contemporary ideals of symmetry and beauty and yet have ugly personalities, and those who are physically asymmetrical but have wonderful personalities. Of course you can get physically ugly people who have ugly personalities, and beautiful people who have nice personalities.

    We have a right to describe the world as we see it independently of actually 'creating' a human being.

  7. DannyMaio profile image59
    DannyMaioposted 7 years ago

    It is just an opinion or what we are taught from TV. everyone has beauty.

  8. onegoodwoman profile image75
    onegoodwomanposted 7 years ago

    What a profound observation!!!

    Most of us, will say something to the effect of knowing what we like to look at.........how weak.

  9. ginjill ashberry profile image77
    ginjill ashberryposted 7 years ago

    I was called ugly once, by a guy who was and still is a good friend to me. He may have said i am ugly as in physically ugly (when you are wasted during a night of heavy, 'sorry' drinking; anyone would look ugly). But i too realized that i have acted badly. I accepted what he said with an opened mind. My behavior and drunkenness is rightfully ugly.
    Certain people have a right to tell you, that you are acting in an ugly way. When a parent tells us that, it doesn't take away their love for us. Ugly is a word. I never took it well when i was younger, now, it doesn't bother me. We already know that we are each unique creation of God and he loves us. We are the way we look because he thought we are beautiful. What gives a person a right to say it? Just like all the other bad words that are used in conversation these days. They're just words. it cannot demean you but the person who utters it.

  10. nightwork4 profile image61
    nightwork4posted 7 years ago

    all parents created a human being so i guess i don't even agree with your question .

  11. TimMEy profile image83
    TimMEyposted 7 years ago

    Probably the freedoms of Speech an Thought. You don´t need to create something in order to have an opinion. If you think somebody is ugly then it´s your opinion and nothing won´t change that. What is attracted to one person is not necessarily be beautiful for another person and that is a good thing.

  12. ThunderKeys profile image67
    ThunderKeysposted 7 years ago

    Wow! What a great question! It sure has been a while since I've read one of this quality. To say someone is "ugly" really is to insult the work of the Creator.

    We also limit ourselves from connecting with the another beautiful creation through these kinds dangerous unchallenged assumptions.

    But isn't it worse when others falsely lead us to believe someone is ugly or bad then when we lead ourselves to such statements or conclusions? 

    Again, powerful question!
    - Duddy.

  13. kallini2010 profile image81
    kallini2010posted 7 years ago

    I will be in the minority, as usual. I am blessed with good looks.  But I always thought that I was not - thanks to my mother.  I never fully recovered from believing that I was not good-looking.

    We do create human beings, but unfortunately or maybe fortunately, we are not in control of the manufacturing process.  Otherwise with all our good intentions, we may create sinking Titanics.  "When things go wrong..."

    We don't choose sex, looks, genetic code of our children.  We do have some control (we can smoke or not smoke, drink or not drink, eat healthy, et cetera), but "making human beings" is still a lottery.  You hope for your child to be at least healthy and you hope for him/her to look good.  Not to be beautiful, but to look good (not to be repulsive).  For a reason.

    If you did not know and it is a fact, human babies and babies look cute so parents will experience love and care for them.

    "Ugly" is not just a word.  "Ugly" is antonym of "Beautiful".  We need WORDS to describe things.  Our response to visual stimuli is different - we like to look at beautiful things and we don't like to look at ugly things.

    Being ugly is not a person's fault (it depends on what ugly means in each case), but don't fool yourself - you may never say the word, but you are drawn to beauty.  I studied sociology and there were studies about the different reactions.  Parents differentiate between better looking and not-so-good looking children.  Parents always have favourites regardless of what they say.  I don't understand why people love to deny the obvious.

    I know one young girl - I don't know her, I never talked to her, I see her often enough and maybe she is a good person, but, boy, I cannot look at her.  I simply cannot. What gives me the right?  My own brain tells me there is a difference between pleasing sights and disturbing ones.

    1. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      There IS such a thing as beauty & ugliness.  This is an undeniable fact of life.  There are people who are easy on & comforting to the eyes & psyche as there are THOSE who are UNEASY on & DISCOMFORTING to the eyes!

  14. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/9007815_f260.jpg

    Humans love to invent and create categories and systems for judging and labelling people.  Humans furthermore love to separate people into so-called desirable and undesirable groups.  It is part of the human condition to establish a pecking order as to who is deemed worthy and who is deemed unworthy.

    It is inherent in human nature to establish artificial barriers among people.  It is also human nature to have an inferior caste in order to make the superior caste feel worthy.  In this society, looks are one of the main barometers in judging people.  Looks are one of the initial factors as to how people are considered and judged.   Furthermore, there is a general societal consensus determining as to what looks are deemed positve or negative.

    Humans are highly judgmental in many aspects, especially looks.  To reiterate, there is a general societal consensus as to what is considered to be attractive and unattractive by type of facial structure.  If a person's facial structure is harmonious, he/she is considered to be attractive.  Conversely, a person who has disharmonious facial structure is often deemed unattractive, bad-looking, even ugly. 

    Humans tend to gravitate towards those who are considered to be attractors i.e. people who are beautiful or at least physically attractive while they are repelled by those who are ugly.  The range of looks is determined as to whether the person is easy on the eyes or hard on the eyes.  Humans determine that those who are easy on the eyes or eye candy range from attractive to beautiful/handsome.  On the contrary, humans determine that those who are hard on the eyes range from unattractive to u-g-l-y.

    Each society prescribes and preordains who is beautiful or ugly according the prevailing social consensus of what is considered to be attractive or ugly.  It varies from society to society.  Humans ascribe attractiveness to physical features that are in conference to that particular society while ascribing ugliness to features that DON'T confirm to the prevailing societal construct.  What is considered beautiful or ugly is a man-made societal/social construct and is often done to elevate, include some(the attractive, beautiful) while excluding, marginalizing, even demonizing others(the unattractive, bad-looking, the ugly).

 
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