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Doesn't the 2016 Election make it clear that the USA is a republic, not a democr

  1. Perspycacious profile image81
    Perspycaciousposted 13 months ago

    Doesn't the 2016 Election make it clear that the USA is a republic, not a democracy?

    Forget the "Popular Vote."  It doesn't apply in a republic, though it would if the USA wasnot a republic but a democracy.  Similarly, the argument could be made that as a group of 50 states, it might be democratic to decide who wins on the basis of which candidate wins the most states.  The system in the USA for all the years of its existence is based on winning the votes of the states' electors, and that legitimized President Trump as the winner of the 2016 Election.

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13457709_f260.jpg

  2. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
    bradmasterOCcalposted 13 months ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12929193_f260.jpg

    Demas, that is exactly correct. The democrats started the election saying the Trump would never get the needed 270 EC votes.
    Then when they thought they won the election, the EC was OK. But in the last hours of the election they lost the EC votes.

    Then, they changed horses, now they claim that Hillary won the election because of the popular vote. But, at the same time they claim that Russia hacked the election causing them to lose the election.

    They want it both ways, and they don't care how illogical it is, they just want the win. Trump also won over 90% of all the US counties. That is a type of popular vote. Hillary won the popular vote from one state CA where Trump got 4 million votes while Hillary got 7 million votes. There is the difference in the popular vote.

    Hillary won all the 55 CA EC votes. And between CA, IL and NY she won 104 EC votes.

    The EC to make it fair should not a any state winner take all. For the most part it worked for HRC better than Trump for the high EC vote states.

    As to your question, people forget or they didn't know that there is a difference between a democracy and a democratic republic.

    "And to the Republic for which it stands". This should have given them a clue.

    Hillary and the democrats should have realized that when they lost congress that it was a sign that it was because of the Trump win for the presidency.

    Hillary and the democrats didn't have a clue that she could come up that short on the EC votes, and that is why then never talked about the popular vote. They were convinced that Trump couldn't make 270.

    What does the popular vote means when it comes from 1 state. CA has been a democrat stronghold for decades. Clinton didn't campaign the states that lost her the EC votes.

  3. MizBejabbers profile image89
    MizBejabbersposted 13 months ago

    Election be damned, our Pledge of Allegiance contains the words "and to the republic for which it stands." The popular vote means very little, if nothing, as proved by the Bush-Gore election and the Trump-Hillary election. Our forefathers made the United States a republic theoretically to keep the more populated states from dominating the ones with the less populace, but now it seems to be backfiring from all the polarization in the two-party system.

    1. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
      bradmasterOCcalposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Miz B - good one, and ironically how many actually Pledge Allegiance to the US anymore?

    2. MizBejabbers profile image89
      MizBejabbersposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      I don't know the answer, Brad, but I do. I belong to the DAR and we say the pledge every month that we meet.

  4. profile image79
    Hxprofposted 13 months ago

    Yes, it does.  There's no problem with the Electoral College.

    1. Perspycacious profile image81
      Perspycaciousposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Watch out though!  Some are trying to get enough states to pledge their electors to the candidate who wins the popular vote!  They are trying to subvert the Constitution, and guess who they are?

 
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