Slap on the Wrist, I Say

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  1. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12436643.jpg
    Although Amber Guyger was found guilty of murder, she got a LIGHT sentence of 10 years.  Do you believe that Ms. Guyger's sentence was too light?  Do you maintain that Ms. Guyger should have gotten a much stiffer sentence of least 20 years or maybe life?

    1. GA Anderson profile image90
      GA Andersonposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      No, I think 10 years was a fair sentence.

      GA

    2. The0NatureBoy profile image57
      The0NatureBoyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      By my interpretation of scripture suggesting Civilization only have 9 years of life left, if she serves the 10 it will be life, so yes, it is sufficient, and even if she only serves the minimum of 5 it is because the saved will be in Armageddon awaiting the last trumpet to reveal they can begin replenishing earth.

    3. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Because it was not premeditated on her part, she received a reduced sentence. It was a case of gross negligence and poor judgement. But, I confess from our row of bleachers, we thought that she would have been "slapped on the wrist" and released from serious charges in what Texas would have excused as just another tragic accident.

      Well, she will have to do "some time". And while she is there some of the "Sisters" might educate her a bit about the "black experience", that should prove most enlightening for her. What ever lessons that she has yet to learn from this tragic affair will be taught.

      So, I find the sentence satisfactory under the circumstances.

      1. gmwilliams profile image84
        gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Oh yes, the SISTERS will educate her.  YES THEY WILL- they will give her some of that street justice.

      2. GA Anderson profile image90
        GA Andersonposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        I like your perspective Cred.

        GA

  2. hard sun profile image80
    hard sunposted 3 years ago

    I agree ten years was fair considering the circumstances. We should also keep in mind that a sentence doesn't end when you are no longer incarcerated. Her life will never be the same, and she will always face barriers to everything from getting a job and an apartment to traveling outside the country.

  3. profile image0
    PrettyPantherposted 3 years ago

    I think  in this case and generally speaking, police officers get off too easy, too often. I think about what I would do if I entered what I thought was my apartment to find a strange man sitting on my couch. I certainly would not automatically shoot him, and a police officer should be more courageous and level-headed than me, shouldn't she?

    1. wilderness profile image97
      wildernessposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I pretty much agree with this, with some further thoughts.

      I probably wouldn't shoot either, but I don't carry a gun, I haven't been trained to shoot upon threat and I can't imagine entering an apartment and not instantly recognizing that that isn't my furniture.

      I don't know that a cop is automatically more courageous, but (s)he should be far more able to act on something other than fear.  Or maybe that's the definition of courage.

    2. The0NatureBoy profile image57
      The0NatureBoyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I also agree with you concerning police getting off easy.

    3. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      AGREED, she took a life.  She INTENDED to take a life.  She should have gotten AT LEAST 20 years.  In my assessment, she should either gotten life or the death penalty.

      1. hard sun profile image80
        hard sunposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        I certainly understand the argument. I also think some of the difference in agreement may be due to differences in how we see the purpose of incarceration. Revenge, punishment, rehabilitation, protecting society? To what degree do we think each of these should be considered?

        Could this lady come out of prison and make a positive difference in our society, or any individual's life? What is the risk she would do something like this again?

        1. hard sun profile image80
          hard sunposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          I think America is not ready for this discussion.

    4. GA Anderson profile image90
      GA Andersonposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Everyone should be more level-headed than you!

      Okay, okay, it was a joke, but you know you can't leave the door open like that and not expect somebody to walk through it. ;-)

      However, I do agree with your point. It does seem to me that, in recent times, the gun is the reflective choice of action. But, it must be said that we everyday citizens don't have to live our daily lives facing the dangers that police do every minute they are on the beat. Just think of recent routine traffic stops that turned into police ambushes. Or domestic calls that escalate to shots through the door before the police even know what they are facing.

      We see the optics one way and I bet a policeman sees another picture.

      GA

      1. profile image0
        PrettyPantherposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Lol, I'm quite level-headed except when it comes to my morning coffee or Denzel Washington. :-)

        I understand that police officers might have a skewed view of situations due to the nature of their day-to-day work. However, I don't think that is a legitimate justification for unnecessarily  shooting people as often as seems to occur in the states. I don't think police officer even ranks in the top ten most dangerous occupations.

        Anyway, shouldn't they be better trained and more level-headed than the average citizen? If you're so fearful that you feel threatened by a man sitting on a couch  maybe you're not fit to carry a gun much less be a cop.

        1. GA Anderson profile image90
          GA Andersonposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          "Anyway, shouldn't they be better trained and more level-headed than the average citizen? If you're so fearful that you feel threatened by a man sitting on a couch  maybe you're not fit to carry a gun much less be a cop."

          Yep.

          GA

 
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