Jacob Chansey The Shaman Of The Capitol Riot Will Be Sentenced

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  1. Sharlee01 profile image83
    Sharlee01posted 12 months ago

    https://hubstatic.com/15783825.jpg
    Jacob Chansey was one of the most high-profile people who broke into the Capitol as Congress met to certify the vote count of the Electoral College in the 2020 presidential election. Images of him wearing face paint and a furry horned and feathered hat while baring his tattooed chest were widely circulated.

    Charge(s):
    Civil Disorder; Obstruction of an Official Proceeding; Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building; Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building; Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building; Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building.  https://www.justice.gov/usao-dc/defenda … ob-anthony

    Chansley was originally charged with six federal crimes. He pleaded guilty to one of the most serious charges and could face a maximum of 20 years in prison, though his LACK of a CRIMINAL record means he'll likely receive much less. As part of the plea agreement, Chansley agreed to pay $2,000 in restitution for damage to the Capitol. He could also face a fine of up to $250,000.  https://www.aol.com/news/qanon-shaman-s … 55253.html

    Jacob Chansley, the Jan. 6 rioter who became known as the ‘QAnon Shaman’ after he stormed the U.S. Capitol shirtless, wearing horns on his head and bearing a pole with a spear tip, should serve more than four years in prison, according to a sentencing memorandum.

    “The prosecutor’s recommendation supports the proposition that the Government remains willfully delusional about the role in the events of January 6 of a young, gentle man with zero criminal history and long-standing mental health vulnerabilities. It is shameful,” his attorney, Albert Watkins, told NBC News early Wednesday morning.

    Prosecutors submitted the memo Tuesday night, recommending the court hand down a sentence of 51 months, followed by three years of supervised release and $2,000 restitution. Chansey's sentencing is set for Nov. 17.

    The majority of those charged in the Jan,6 riot were charged with misdemeanor charges and were more or less doing the same thing as Jacob. They received very lenient sentences and fines.  Is Jacob being made an example of due to his very flamboyant recognizable costume? --  A costume most American's have been made well aware of and would recognize as a symbol of the Jan, 6, riot.

    So, simply does this man deserve a sentence of 51 months, followed by three years of supervised release and $2,000 restitution?

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      I didn't see a charge of "insurrection" anywhere on that list...will that mean that the ridiculous charges of Trump's "insurrection" are doomed as well?

      4 years seems a bit much, particularly given that the rioters all over the country, burning and destroying buildings and vehicles while attacking police get nothing at all.

      1. Sharlee01 profile image83
        Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        I have not run across anyone charged with "insurrection". I feel that is just a media label thus far, must admit it pulls one in to listen to a news report on the Jan 6th riot.

        Federal prosecutors have so far resisted charging any of the upwards of 500 defendants who allegedly participated in the riot with sedition or treason or insurrection according to the AP.

        The riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, has led to what the DOJ calls the largest criminal investigation in American history. The  FBI has classified the attack as an act of domestic terrorism.

        The government has brought criminal charges against more than 675 individuals, the FBI continues to arrest new suspects as they find them. Meanwhile, some of these cases are reaching their conclusions. More than 120 defendants have pleaded guilty to one or more charges, and the charges against one defendant were dismissed. At least 28 people have been sentenced. No defendants have gone to trial.

        Here is a link to the database of all thus far charged. Not one has been charged with committing an insurrection. https://www.npr.org/2021/02/09/96547204 … s#database

        This Jacob fellow has clearly in my view been made a scapegoat.
        In my view, the "Summer of Love protest/riots" were far worse than the Capitol protest/riot

        1. GA Anderson profile image90
          GA Andersonposted 12 months agoin reply to this

          I think this fellow made himself the "scapegoat."

          I won't guess what an appropriate sentence is, but I will judge that he is guilty as hell of a crime.

          GA

          1. Sharlee01 profile image83
            Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

            Due to his mental problems, I can't agree he should be put in prison. I do agree he committed crimes. However, he was diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety by the federal Bureau of Prisons.

            It just seems the prosecution is asking for a very harsh prison sentence for someone with his mental problems.

            1. GA Anderson profile image90
              GA Andersonposted 12 months agoin reply to this

              Then we agree, he committed a crime.

              GA

              1. Sharlee01 profile image83
                Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

                Very clear he committed a crime.   My OP offered a bit of background on the crimes Jacob was charged with, a statement from his attorney, the steep sentence that the prosecutor suggested, and the fact that the majority of people that were charged for crimes committed at the Capitol received lenient sentences.  I asked one direct question --- "So, simply does this man deserve a sentence of 51 months, followed by three years of supervised release and $2,000 restitution?"

                Just wondered if the fact he was mentally challenged made a difference in one's answer.

                Thank's for sharing your thoughts.

                1. tsmog profile image78
                  tsmogposted 12 months agoin reply to this

                  Chiming in. There was a man sentenced to over three years for his participation of Jan 6. He did punch a cop in the face, though. So, Chensey is not the only receiving a steep sentence.

                  https://www.nj.com/news/2021/11/nj-man- … ction.html

                  1. Sharlee01 profile image83
                    Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

                    Yes, it is clear some that who were violent have received appropriate sentences.  My main point is being missed -- due to Jacob being mentally ill - he was diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety by the federal Bureau of Prisons.

                    Should he be put in prison or receive a sentence that would be suitable for a man that is mentally ill?

                    I certainly have made it clear I feel any and all that broke the law on that day should be punished. After doing some research, it is clear many pleaded guilty and received very light sentences.  I find this fact a problem. However, I just feel this Jacob may have been made a scapegoat.  Here are the charges, none indicate he hit an officer --- Obstruction of an Official Proceeding; Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building; Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building; Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building; Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building.

                    You are not alone in feeling he should be punished and his mental illness should not play a part in his sentence.   

                    Thanks for sharing your view.

                2. GA Anderson profile image90
                  GA Andersonposted 12 months agoin reply to this

                  For me, nothing short of a Down's syndrome mentality gets any slack. I don't see the event as an insurrection or "soft" coup, but I also don't see it as a patriotic, (just misguided?), effort of resisting tyranny. It was a mob acting with a mob mentality. No different than a lynch mob of `good' citizens. (that lynch mob thing was a generalization. I don't think they really intended to hang VP Pence)

                  GA

                  1. Sharlee01 profile image83
                    Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

                    I did not feel the Jan 6 protest/riot was in any respect appropriate once it became an unruly riot.  I think any that broke the law needed to be charged, and punished for their crimes. I am against putting the mentally ill in prison. I would prefer they be institutionalized in a facility where they can be treated.  In any case, the judge decides a sentence, and where it will be carried out.

    2. Credence2 profile image77
      Credence2posted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Imagine a grown man in such a ridiculous outfit?

      Regardless, I think that a hefty fine, and I mean hefty should suffice. If he did not assualt guards or steal anything, I might be willing to see him forego jail time. His stupidity as reflected in his costume should not translate to a greater sentence.

      1. wilderness profile image96
        wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

        I agree...given that the fine doesn't bankrupt him for life.  What is "hefty" for one can cost another everything they have, or will have, for the foreseeable future.  Our justice system has a problem in that regard - one I don't have an answer for.

        1. Credence2 profile image77
          Credence2posted 12 months agoin reply to this

          Hefty is defined as somewhere in between bankrupting and a "slap on the wrist". There needs to be a substantive bite and it needs to hurt.

          This sort assualt must not happen again.

          1. wilderness profile image96
            wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

            But this sort of assault will happen again, and it will do so over and over and over.  It just (probably) won't happen at the Capital building, that's all.  We, as a nation, have made it clear that it's OK to riot, burn and destroy if we feel our "cause is just" and we are, and will continue to, pay the costs of that poor decision.

            The verbiage from left wingers turned the Capital riot into a fight against Trump, but it wasn't.  It was about a group of people using violence to further their goals...just as was done in dozens of cities across the country.  The goal was different, the people from a different political persuasion (for the most part anyway) and the Capital riot frightened our exalted leaders when it happened on their turf rather than that of the little guys on the street, but at the root is was just the same as all the other riots; an attempt to use violence and terrorism to further the goals of the idiots participating.

            1. Credence2 profile image77
              Credence2posted 12 months agoin reply to this

              Wilderness, riots and protests have been with us since the Republic's founding.

              And what were the goals of this unique assualt? To subvert the Constitutionally ordained democratic process, because a handful could not accept the outcome of the last election and wanted an anti-democratic solution.  Like, I said to you before assualt on the Capitol, the very system of our means of government, is a first in the history of this country. So, it is more than just "another" riot.

      2. Sharlee01 profile image83
        Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        Jacob Chansley, was diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety by the federal Bureau of Prisons. And I must agree his outfit was ridiculous.  His charges were Charge(s):
        Civil Disorder; Obstruction of an Official Proceeding; Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building; Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building; Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building; Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building.

        So, he did break several laws. But, so many that broke laws that exhibited violence have pleaded guilty and got very light-type sentences or no sentence at all. 

        Although it might be a good idea to get him some form of institutional help where he can be treated for his mental illnesses.

        I just found it also odd they chose to go after Jacob, and let many that did a whole lot more go.

        I think any that broke the law on that day need to charge and punished for their crimes with an appropriate sentence. But someone that does not have all his faculties may need to be treated diffrently.  Can't imagine this guy in prison.

        1. Credence2 profile image77
          Credence2posted 12 months agoin reply to this

          Those that were involved in assaults, thefts and demonstrative property damage need to be heavily fined and/or jailed. If Chansley's behavior can really be associated with mental illness, I can see my way clear to be lenient. It is funny that his "madness" expresses itself in association with the Trump hoard that attacked the Capitol that day.

          1. Sharlee01 profile image83
            Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

            Many that committed similar crimes as Jacob committed received very lenient sentences. It would seem due to him being very recognizable due to his crazy costume, sort of a poster guy, I think he may have been used as a scapegoat. This man due to his mental problems could very possibly harm others. It's clear he does pose a threat to society. So, what do we do with a guy like Jacob?  Prison or back on the street?  Most likely he will be kicked back to the curb. Hopefully, Jacob does not go on to commit more serious crimes.

 
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