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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (13 posts)

Why migrated communities are more hard working?

  1. jainismus profile image68
    jainismusposted 6 years ago

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/6303087.png
    Why migrated communities are more hard working? Why local people are comparatively slow workers or lazy? Why most of nations are ruled by those who were once outsiders?

    1. CyclingFitness profile image93
      CyclingFitnessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Very interesting question

      Migrant workers seem to be more inclined in the UK to take more menial jobs and then use them as a stepping stone from my experience whereas our current system seems more associated with putting over-qualified candidates into mid level positions due to the rise and rise of the recruitment consultant who is in effect a job applicant salesperson.

    2. kerryg profile image87
      kerrygposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      They have to be. The people already here have support networks and connections and such to help them succeed. Immigrants don't, so they have to work that much harder to catch up. Plus, depending on your visa status you have the ever-present threat of getting kicked out of the country if you don't work or study hard and you may be ineligible for many of the various forms of social assistance available to locals, such as academic scholarships.

    3. Joelipoo profile image82
      Joelipooposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Generally, migrant workers don't have much of an option. When they go somewhere new, they are at the bottom of the totem pole and have to work their way up. A lot of people who are already settled in an area believe certain jobs are beneath them.

    4. prettydarkhorse profile image64
      prettydarkhorseposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      They also need to familiarize themselves with the new culture - i.e, foods, weather, style of clothing conducive to the new environment. The feel of being part of the new social environment is important for them. For some it is easier to adapt to the new environment while others struggle. The support system, legal, social are very important. Family, friends and relatives help a lot.

    5. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The average immigrant who comes to the United States wants to create a better life for himself/herself and his/her family.   Even those who are highly educated often have to perform jobs which are below their educational levels until they pass a proficiency examination e.g. doctors, nurses, and/or other professions.   

      Those who are not highly educated, often take jobs which many Americans would deride.   Let me not digress.   The average immigrant views the United States as the land of opportunity and believe that no job is beneath him/her as long as that job helps him/her achieve a desired dream.   The average immigrant often have a phenomenal and prodigious work ethic.   He/she is of the belief that one makes his/her own destiny and that one should be the contributor to, not the recipient of society.

  2. dzephaniah profile image61
    dzephaniahposted 6 years ago

    They are not hard working people. If they were, they would work hard in their own country. They are known as people of "maniana", never in the rush finishing anything. However they are motivated by money! You still need someone to supervise them all the time.

  3. dzephaniah profile image61
    dzephaniahposted 6 years ago

    They are not hard working people. If they were, they would work hard in their own country. They are known as people of "maniana", never in the rush finishing anything. However they are motivated by money! You still need someone to supervise them all the time.

    1. prettydarkhorse profile image64
      prettydarkhorseposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Here in the US, there is a strong correlation between race and affluence. The top household earners across all races are Asian Americans. That includes educational achievement. There is variation across all other migrant races. You could say most are hardworking, but not all.

    2. profile image0
      Peelander Gallyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      If you've ever been to a developing nation you'd understand that acquiring a position higher than something like a bank teller in a nicer downtown area is extremely difficult without becoming a corrupt political or criminal lackey.

  4. prettydarkhorse profile image64
    prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago

    I want to add my assumption that working hard is always correlated with more earnings and higher educational attainment. Income and educational attainment are some indicators of social status. Sometimes you strike luck and you become rich by being lucky, gambling, speculating, business or trading - rare cases.

  5. Xenonlit profile image60
    Xenonlitposted 6 years ago

    They are not more hard working. Some have not learned how to work in their new country, and have to fight against the learning curve. Others are so uneducated and unqualified that they have to work more hours at menial jobs to make a decent living.

    This is not a diss. The first generation of immigrants is often the generation that needs the most support. They will work the most menial and time consuming jobs. The second generation, if they have not been sequestered from their new culture, is expected to be more fluent in the language, trained to the new nation's education and credentialing standards and thus more successful.

    Many immigrants to the U.S. bring excellent skills and trades, but do not have the credentials or investment seed money that qualifies them for work or owning a business in the U.S.

    Medical professionals, journeymen trades and others have had to to work in lesser and lower paying jobs because they may have trouble with getting their educations tuned up to meet US or other nation's standards.

    It is not a one-size-fits all situation in the U.S. We have migrants from every point in the world. Many have had generational failure, others have been successful in the first generation, most have made it and ensured that their children have done much better.

    This is still not an endorsement of unlimited and uncontrolled immigration. The U.S. needs to shut it down until the economy and opportunities for existing immigrants and citizens are restored. There is no longer any such thing as "unlimited room" for everyone who wants opportunity here.

    1. dzephaniah profile image61
      dzephaniahposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. I couldn't say it better. There is much kind of immigrants. Unfortunately the open border with Mexico, also invites lots of criminals that came here to hide and bring a crime. They totally corrupt this society.

 
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