Over 60% of Registered Voters Want All Illegal Immigrants Deported

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  1. Readmikenow profile image94
    Readmikenowposted 4 weeks ago

    CBS host shocked by poll showing 62% of registered voters support deporting all illegal immigrants

    A CBS News/YouGov poll found that 62% of registered voters said they would support a government program that would deport all migrants living in the U.S. illegally. The poll, conducted between June 5-7, also found that a majority of registered voters supported Biden's latest executive action at the southern border.

    Anthony Salvanto, CBS' director of elections and surveys, said that while the support for a deportation effort was mostly among supporters of former President Trump, some Democrats supported it as well.

    "When you measure public sentiment on this or really just about any policy, you're getting a sense of direction. You're getting broad brushstrokes," Salvanto said.

    Salvanto also said the poll asked if respondents felt local authorities should be involved in deporting the migrants.

    "A lot of folks do say yes. Again, the details of that, the specifics, you're not going to pick that up in an aggregate public opinion," he said.

    "We are in a different era in which a lot of folks say the system as a whole is not working. And all of these, if you connect the dots through them, are part of that reaction against it, which explains some of that general sentiment for some of these policies," Salvanto continued.

    https://www.foxnews.com/media/cbs-host- … immigrants

    1. Willowarbor profile image60
      Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Do these people have any idea what Trump's plan of deporting 10 million people would do to our economy?  They'll really be crying about their bread prices along with a lot of other things

      Estimates suggest that even the cost of detaining, processing, and physically removing  10 million  immigrants would be astronomical. The country’s immigration system isn’t capable of such punitive expediency.   The idea is actually ludicrous.

      Since Trump likes to deal in fantasy, let’s indulge him: What if Trump could  make America’s undocumented community instantly disappear? The consequences for the country’s economy would be dire and immediate.

      According to a study by New American Economy, a bipartisan research group, businesses owned by immigrants in general employ more than 8 million Americans and add $1 trillion to the economy.

      Numerous specific industries would be affected by the disappearance or severe reduction of the immigrant workforce. The restaurant and hospitality industry would be in serious trouble: a fifth of the country’s cooks and 24 percent of maids and housecleaners are undocumented. So are 22 percent of construction workers, so building across the country would likely grind to a halt.

      The U.S. pork industry?   At the labor level, the people who actually perform the work,  At least 80 percent of them are immigrants. I suppose we could do without pork, those who want it will can pay a premium. The same holds true for meat packing, working crops and the dairy industry. A declining immigrant labor would be disaster for those industries. And of course it would be the American people who would pay the price for Trump's ridiculous idea.

      I think those folks need to remember that these people are doing the very tough, demanding jobs in harsh circumstances that Americans, for the most part, prefer not to do. 

      Who will fill the jobs of the deported?

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        "The U.S. pork industry?   At the labor level, the people who actually perform the work,"

        Do you mean that for some reason, immigrants tend to work the pork industry, or are you saying that 80% of the people that that industry hires are illegal aliens, working illegally in their businesses?  I would find that pretty hard to believe, but if true is a VERY sad comment on our legal system.

        How about if we deport those 30 million or so people over the span of 10 or 20 years rather that the obviously impossible overnight?

        1. Willowarbor profile image60
          Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          No, I am saying that immigrants do jobs that Americans have not wanted to do for a very long time. They are demanding and dangerous.  If we deport the people who make crucial industries run, where do their replacements come from?  How do we coerce Americans to take these jobs? Pay them more?  We all know who will bear the brunt of that extra cost.

          And no, I have no interest in deporting people who are working, paying taxes and  contributing to society.  It is a ridiculous idea.   Are there any credible economists that support this plan?

          1. Readmikenow profile image94
            Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Legal or illegal immigrants?

            There is a BIG difference.

            1. Willowarbor profile image60
              Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              Undocumented immigrants make up the following...

              Construction trade workers, 23%
              Meat packing, 20%
              Agriculture/farm workers, 41%
              Dairy, 51%
              Restaurant, 16%

              It’s essential that we ensure that people who come here do so legally. But the reality, however, is that there are currently an estimated 11 million individuals living here for decades without legal status.

              Undocumented immigrants make up 5.5 million of the workers in essential industries in the United States, (according to a source in 2020, it's likely higher now) Yet they lack access to the same protections as their coworkers. They do not qualify for unemployment benefits and cannot access Medicaid.

              The vast majority  are working, paying taxes.  They play a crucial role in agriculture, construction, hospitality, and other industries that are essential to our economy.  We need these people to do jobs our own people will not do.  These people need paths to citizenship, not deportation.

              From an interview with the restaurant owner in Missouri..  When asked how many eating establishments have undocumented workers in the kitchen in her Midwestern city, Lynn states flatly: "A hundred percent. You cannot hire American here."

              She maintains that her staff, all of whom come from Central Mexico, are key to her restaurant's success. She says they're dependable, loyal and incredibly hard working. Without them she would have to close her doors.

              The issue is the same, whether it is a family restaurant or a large chicken processing plant, there are not Americans willing to do these jobs.  That's a reality we have to deal with.

              Again, are there any economists who are backing Trump's plan?

              https://www.npr.org/2019/08/21/75233613 … erican-her

              1. Readmikenow profile image94
                Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                "Undocumented immigrants"

                NO, they are illegal immigrants who are breaking the law by being here.

                Somebody please explain to me why these people shouldn't have to go the same process of legally immigrating to the United States like my relatives.

                What makes them so special?

                When illegal immigrants are given jobs and benefits I consider it a slap in the face to my family and the thousands of people who follow the laws and come here legally.

                These businesses should be fined for hiring illegal immigrants.  If they want to hire American citizens, they're going to have to change their business model to accommodate the requirement to follow the law.

              2. wilderness profile image95
                wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                And we look the other way from people like the restaurant owner...and her employees.

                Why can't we look the other way on my taxes?  Or my speeding ticket?  I have paid more taxes in my life than any 3 illegal alien families will.

                1. Willowarbor profile image60
                  Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  So instead of changing policy and adding more expedient pathways to citizenship we should just let small businesses  close because they cannot employ enough American citizens to keep their doors open?  When the big industries lose a large percentage of their undocumented workers, those costs will just be passed on to us. This is a situation we can change with immigration reform.

                  In terms of what these people pay...Unauthorized immigrants pay sales taxes, as does everybody else, and very significant numbers of them also have federal and state tax withholding in their paychecks

                  Likewise,undocumented immigrants pay taxes, amounting to tens of billions of dollars in local, state, and federal taxes per year,  even though they can’t access most benefits that U.S. citizens are entitled to receive.

                  The Social Security Administration estimated in 2010, for example, that such immigrants contribute $12 billion per year more to the Social Security system than they take out.

                  Maybe you could provide a credible source that supports Trump's Mass deportation plan.

                  https://apnews.com/article/fact-check-i … 3035929946

                  1. wilderness profile image95
                    wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Should we let businesses be forced to close because they can't pay their taxes?  Because they can't properly control their hazmat emissions?  Because they can't follow any of a hundred different laws and remain in business?

                    What makes that one - you cannot hire illegal aliens to work in the US - so special that we must give them a "bye" on the law?  If we do, how about a "bye" on my taxes?

                    There isn't a chance in the world that the illegal aliens in this country give to the country more than they take from it.  All your "arguments" that they pay taxes, contribute to SS, make products, etc...ALL of them are dwarfed by the sums we pay to support them.  From free school lunches to bilingual courts, we pay and we pay and we pay.

          2. Miebakagh57 profile image69
            Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            No, not in the least.

          3. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Immigrant A foreign born person that is in the US legally, and either has or intends to become a US citizen and is working towards that goal.

            No one is even thinking about deporting immigrants - the only question is why you insinuate they are.

            (If you "contribute" $1 to society and take $5 from it, society has a net loss.  Which is exactly what illegal aliens are doing.)

  2. Valeant profile image84
    Valeantposted 4 weeks ago

    I don't see an issue in enforcing the laws.  Count me among the 62%.

    1. GA Anderson profile image87
      GA Andersonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Is there a 'time-in-country' component to your agreement? There is with mine.

      I also agree with the 62%ers. However, there is a time factor involved for me. I would go with a 10-year statute of limitations. If an illegal immigrant has been here for 10 years, has integrated into their communities, and built a law-abiding life, I would give them a green card and a path to citizenship.

      GA

      1. Valeant profile image84
        Valeantposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        If there was a statute of limitations written into the law, I would go with that.  But saying to those that evade the legal pathways to citizenship that you can eventually get permission to stay if you hide away long enough, isn't the right message.

        1. Willowarbor profile image60
          Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          Val, the problem can be solved at least in part by creating more expedient pathways to work and citizenship that will allow these folks to come legally and fill much need positions. But at this point, expelling workers who power crucial industries is cutting off our nose to spite our face.  We need to do better going forward.

          1. Valeant profile image84
            Valeantposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            I would be in favor of Congress allowing businesses to be able to protect vital workers, if those businesses felt that was necessary.  But I would also like to see stipulations that those workers could not send any earnings out of country.  If you make it here, spend it here.

            1. Readmikenow profile image94
              Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              "I would also like to see stipulations that those workers could not send any earnings out of country"

              That won't happen.  That is the reason many of them come here.  A good portion of Cuba's economy comes from people sending money from the United States to their families in Cuba. 

              Same in Mexico.

              There are illegal immigrants who work in the United States, send a good portion of their money home.  You can live pretty good in some places in Mexico with only a few hundred dollars a month.

              This was told to me by a legal Mexican immigrant.

              1. Valeant profile image84
                Valeantposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                Which is much of the motivation for them to come here.  Take away that motivation and you help to solve the problem.

          2. Readmikenow profile image94
            Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Hey, I know, all you people who want these illegal immigrants here sponsor them.

            That's proactive.

            Easy to come onto the forum and talk, where's the action?

            1. Willowarbor profile image60
              Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              I'm not sure if people who are working need a sponsor. I'm still wondering who will fill the jobs of the deported? And am also waiting to see the reports from economists that give any sort of credence to this plan.

              1. Readmikenow profile image94
                Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                "I'm not sure if people who are working need a sponsor."

                You really need to look up the immigrations laws.

                They ALL need a sponsor.  There are companies who will sponsor their workers, but they will need a sponsor.

                That's the first step toward the coveted green card.

                1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
                  Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Then America is welcoming the immigrants to some  extend. Better to limit they contract and stay.

            2. Valeant profile image84
              Valeantposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              Sure, and all you people that want to deport them all, go get in your car, drive to I.C.E. and apply for a job, and help round them up.

              That's proactive.

              Easy to come onto the forum and talk, where's the action?

              1. Readmikenow profile image94
                Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                Tax dollars are paid to ICE to uphold the immigration laws of the United States.

                It is those on the left who want to harbor those who are breaking the law.  So, there is an avenue you can make them here legally.  Sponsor an illegal alien.

                It's just that simple.

                1. Valeant profile image84
                  Valeantposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Yes, tax dollars are paid to ICE, but if that was working, there wouldn't be any illegal immigrants in the country.  Seems there's a need for added boots on the ground, but only people who want to criticize the other side behind the safety of their keyboard, without taking action of their own.  So put up, or shut up.

                  Your claim that the left wants to harbor those who are breaking the law is a distortion.  Many on the left, for some odd reason, just seem to believe that if they've managed to evade being caught crossing the border, and managed to assimilate into society peacefully and productively, that they have earned the chance to remain.  I disagree with that stance. 

                  Doesn't mean they personally want to help make them citizens, as the right claims.  It just means that they think they should be allowed to remain being peaceful and productive.  Those people also think that after a long enough period of time of being peaceful and productive, they would like our laws to allow them a pathway to citizenship.  I also disagree.  If you came here illegally, I think that should void any future chance of becoming a citizen.

        2. GA Anderson profile image87
          GA Andersonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          I get your point about enticement. My perspective isn't rationally defensible, but I think it is equitable. If we haven't caught them in 10 years, and they did as I mentioned, then it's an earned olly-olly home free as I see it.

          I think the number of 'bad cases' that might fit the loophole would be insignificant compared to the benefits—already received and to come, we get from honest (I know, I know, they have already been dishonest—once) hard-working folks outweigh the danger of it being seen as an enticement factor. Bad guys aren't going to last 10 years without getting into some trouble.

          Other serious crimes have statutes of limitations. *shrug*

          GA

          1. Valeant profile image84
            Valeantposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Both options have their rationality, no doubt.

        3. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          But it is a message we have sent over and over,  This time is just long overdue.

          While I agree with you in principle, I also think that it is 100% our own fault that they have been here so long.  Given that I side with GA.

      2. Ken Burgess profile image73
        Ken Burgessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I think there is a rational middle ground.

        #1 when they break the law... theft, assault, possession of a firearm, driving without a license... a significant crime... hold them, deport them... or create a nice miserable jail... one promoted to the world... this jail is where criminals who come from foreign lands uninvited end up.

        #2 stop inviting them to come, which Biden HAS done.  We can start by taking America OUT of the Global Compact on Migration.  We can stop flying them in from foreign nations, we can stop giving them free phones, free plane tickets, and social services.

        #3 stop funding NGOs with federal funds, funds that are trafficked through the UN, like Money Laundering (similar to how the Democrats use the Ukraine war to funnel billions to their interests and campaigns).

        #4 Use the Border Patrol, ICE, and other government agencies created to stop illegal immigration to STOP illegal immigration, rather than processing illegal immigrants and acting as a taxi service.

        #5 Pay Mexico to shut its Southern Border down, they have a much smaller border, get them to enforce it, let them deal with the negative PR.

        Very simple... enforce the laws on the books... rather than releasing illegal migrants that commit crimes in our cities, without bail.

        Get help from neighboring Mexico to stop the migrations, rather than joining the Global Compact on Migration and trying to do away with Nation states all together.

        1. GA Anderson profile image87
          GA Andersonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          Yep, most of that works for me.

          1, 2, and 4 seem straightforward. 3 and 5 need some work. The NGO thing needs some nuance. The Mexico thought is logical, but . . .

          A few look-arounds prompted by their new president leave the impression that Mexico's law enforcement and military 'control' abilities are realistically not dependable due to cartel influence. If they can't buy what they want they kill for it. Some say their hands are full just policing their major cities and regions.  We can't give them enough money to beat the cartels. *shrug*

          GA

      3. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I could live with that.  I don't like it - we would once again reward illegal activities - but I could live with it.  That would, I believe, also capture the "dreamers" - people who I would absolutely give help to gain citizenship.

        1. GA Anderson profile image87
          GA Andersonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          Yep, I think the 'Dreamers' exemption is the right choice. They didn't bring themselves here. (as I understand the "Dreamers" category)

          GA

          1. Ken Burgess profile image73
            Ken Burgessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Its a bit early to be worrying about the matter...

            Only if we get to a November election that includes Trump...

            Then Trump wins that election...

            Then Trump is allowed to take the Office...

            Then if the Government actually functions and executes the orders of a Trump Presidency... rather than create a more serious coup to Trump's efforts than last time...

            Then perhaps we can look to some rational plan-making for "closing" the borders to free flowing immigrants and removing the majority of the ten+ million that have arrived during the last 3.5 years.

            The 20+ million illegal migrants that were in the country from prior to Biden  they are likely going to be given a pass so long as they haven't/don't commit severe crimes.

            Have to be realistic after all... ;-)

  3. Miebakagh57 profile image69
    Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks ago

    Let Americans decide.

  4. Readmikenow profile image94
    Readmikenowposted 4 weeks ago

    The cost of the government for the illegal immigrants is incredible.

    Money that should be spent on US citizens.

    "Illegal immigrants are offered an array of taxpayer funded benefits, enticing more to come: 'Pull factor'

    There have been more than 7 million migrant crossings during the Biden administration
    "Another benefit to add is legal services for civil deportation hearings, a benefit that U.S. citizens do not receive. Given the millions coming to the U.S. under the Biden administration, American taxpayers will see significant tax increases to pay for all these services given to people who aren’t supposed to be here. That means Americans will have even less money to spend on gas, groceries, and rent," she said.

    While services and assistance are being provided by NGOs, in many cases this is being done with the assistance of federal dollars. In addition to caring for migrants at CBP stations, the federal government is providing hundreds of millions of dollars in funding to NGOs and communities who are receiving migrants. According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), it is providing $640.9 million in FY 2024 via its Shelter and Services Program to allow "non-federal entities," including city governments and NGOs, to off-set costs incurred by the migrant arrivals they are seeing. Recently, DHS expanded the cap for both hotels and airfare to 10 percent of the total funding requested, and allowed NGOs to apply for a waiver of that cap due to an operational need.

    "SSP grants have provided critical support to communities receiving migrants and the need for this support is ongoing," DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said in a statement in September.

    NGOs will help migrants with hotel rooms and travel, which typically involves bus and train tickets, but can in some instances involve flights. Some migrants will book their own flights, while others will use bus travel coordinated by the office of Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, who has set up buses to take migrants to "sanctuary" cities across the U.S. free of charge.

    A 2023 Government Accountability Office report found that the Federal Emergency Management Agency had provided more than $282 million in humanitarian relief grant funding to NGOs in fiscal years 2019, 2021 and 2022.

    According to that report, services provided to migrants included food, clothing, transport to airports or bus stations, medical care, legal aid, translation assistance and assistance with booking travel. Those nonprofits said that typically the migrants pay for their own travel. The majority of the more than $10 million the report looked at was spent on food and shelter (about 58%). The next two categories were per capita spending (on individual food, shelter, health care) and transportation.

    Meanwhile, another DHS pilot program — the Case Management Pilot Program — provides case management and other services to those in immigration removal proceedings. Services include mental health services, school enrollment, legal aid, "cultural orientation programs" and connections to social services — as well as human trafficking screening and departure planning for those being deported.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/explai … ted-states

  5. Willowarbor profile image60
    Willowarborposted 4 weeks ago

    Let's take a realistic look at who these people are.

    More than 60 percent of the 10 million undocumented immigrants, have lived in the United States for at least a decade. That’s a long time.

    We are talking about immigrants who, apart from their immigration status, live normal, decent lives. They have families and jobs here and for 10 years, have been contributing to America through their work and taxes. Roughly 50 percent are Mexicans, many with close family or social and cultural ties to America. Some four million of them are parents of children born here.

    These are the cold, hard facts about them. Do all such immigrants merit wholesale deportations?

    Again, let's turn to the practical reality of such a situation. 

    John Rosenow owns Rosenholm dairy  in western Wisconsin.  He’s certain that a potential shortage of immigrant farm workers would cripple the state’s economy. “Our industry doesn’t exist without immigrant labor,”

    "Eighty percent of the milk in Wisconsin is harvested by immigrants. If you took the immigrants away, way over half of the farms would go out of business.”

    When  asked  what would happen if Trump’s allegedly massive raids reached Wisconsin and swept away many of the immigrants who work in the state’s dairy industry, Rosenow didn’t hesitate. “Within days there wouldn’t be any milk on the shelves. “There would be no people to milk the cows. A lot of the cows would go to slaughter and the industry would downsize by at least 50 percent. There would be a shortage of milk, cheese, and butter within maybe a week.”. Similar comments have been made by those working in the meat and agriculture industry as well.

    Looking at the fiscal level, undocumented workers contribute as much as $6 billion tax dollars to the federal government each year, which would be lost under Trump’s plan. They also pay $12 billion into the Social Security system each year.  Acceptable losses?   And what of the housing market?  The mortgages held by these people?  1.3 million mortgages held by households with undocumented immigrants would be in peril. 

    It is clear that Trump’s plan would go against the interests of the United States on so many levels. Instead of launching a plan to deport the undocumented, we should provide them a path to citizenship and allow the majority to remain and continue to contribute to our economy. In addition, resources should be directed toward modernizing our legal immigration system and toward apprehending immigrants who are a threat, criminals.

    Can anyone cite reputable economists that support Trump's plan in terms of the impact on our economy?  I mean he's promising lower prices on everything, can anyone speak to how we will achieve lower prices under this plan?

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/trump … s-d804979b


    https://cmsny.org/how-trump-mass-deport … -hurt-usa/

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
      Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Like any clear-headed reasonable person, I can see your point well.                                       A foreigner came to live in my country, and had stay for 10 years. That qualified him for a citizenship. Unless they fall short of the host country's culture.                                       Seriously, and critically, those migrants that had stay for a decade, and had contributed much to build the American economy should be moved up to the status of citizenship. It's only the pimps and miscrants that should be deport. Let America decide.

  6. Valeant profile image84
    Valeantposted 4 weeks ago

    'There have been more than 7 million migrant crossings during the Biden administration.'

    This is how they gaslight the right.  They call them crossings, but then do not give the deportation stats that accompany the amount of crossings.  So, people like Mike think all 7 million have been settled here.

  7. Willowarbor profile image60
    Willowarborposted 4 weeks ago

    Why is no one addressing the economic impact of deporting 10 million people?  Many say that removing them from the workforce will bring a recession and exacerbate inflation. 
    Also where are the economists evaluations that support this plan?  I've yet to see one that supports it. Where is the data that this is a sound idea?

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
      Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Sounds great. Where's Nathanville? He's an Englishman, and a Glasgonian. He loves  the Economics and is apt to discuss the matter better in economics terms as it relates to the USA, than  I can do here.

  8. Willowarbor profile image60
    Willowarborposted 4 weeks ago

    An analysis by nonpartisan congressional economists shows how much the U.S. economy and Social Security, depend on a growing immigrant workforce.

    Here are some of the CBO’s predictions for the next decade:

    The U.S. labor force will grow by an extra 5.2 million workers, mostly because of increased immigration. They will boost the country’s Gross Domestic Product by a total of 2%.


    Immigrant workers will add an extra $7 trillion to the U.S. economy within the next decade and an extra $1 trillion in federal tax revenue.


    New immigrants will prevent the U.S. population from shrinking. They will be the source of all U.S. population growth by 2042.

    The CBO’s 96-page report showed how much the U.S. economy and the national budget depend on immigrant workers. Their estimates include people who enter the country illegally and those who enter lawfully.

    Research shows, older workers decided to retire during the pandemic and the U.S.-born population is getting older, it also shows that arriving immigrants are overwhelmingly younger and seeking work opportunities.

    As more Americans retire, new immigrant workers will be largely responsible for expanding the labor force and funding Social Security.

    Trump's plan flies in the face of this data and a multitude of other economists calculations. 

    https://publicintegrity.org/inequality- … mmigrants/

  9. Readmikenow profile image94
    Readmikenowposted 4 weeks ago

    The cost of illegal immigration far exceeds any revenue provided by them.

    From the House Budget Committee

    Key Points
    • The current surge of illegal immigration is unprecedented. Some 2.7 million inadmissible
    aliens have been released into the country by the administration since January 2021.
    There have also been 1.5 million “got-aways” — individuals observed entering illegally
    but not stopped. Visa overstays also seem to have hit a record in FY 2022.
    • We preliminarily estimate that the illegal immigrant population grew to 12.8 million by
    October of 2023, up 2.6 million since January 2021, when the president took office. This
    is the net increase in the illegal population based on monthly Census Bureau data, not the
    number of new arrivals.
    • Illegal immigrants have a negative fiscal impact -- taxes paid minus benefits received --
    primarily because a large share have modest levels of education, resulting in relatively
    low average incomes and tax payments, along with significant use of means-tested
    programs and other government services.
    • Prior research indicates that 69 percent of adult illegal immigrants have no education
    beyond high school, compared to 35 percent of the U.S.-born.
    • Using the National Academies’ estimate of immigrants’ net fiscal impact by education
    level, we estimate that the lifetime fiscal drain (taxes paid minus costs) for each illegal
    immigrant is about $68,000, although this estimate comes with some caveats.
    • Illegal immigrants make extensive use of welfare. Based on government data, we
    estimate that 59 percent of households headed by illegal immigrants use one or more
    major welfare programs, compared to 39 percent of households headed by the U.S.-born.
    • Based on their use rate of major welfare programs, we estimate that illegal immigrants
    receive $42 billion in benefits, or about 4 percent of the total cost of the cash, Medicaid,
    food and housing programs examined in our study. However, this is only a rough
    approximation due to limitations in the data.
    • Illegal immigrants can receive welfare on behalf of U.S.-born children. Also, illegal
    immigrant children can receive school lunch/breakfast and WIC directly. A number of
    states provide Medicaid to some illegal immigrants, and a few provide SNAP. Several
    million illegal immigrants also have work authorization (e.g. DACA, TPS and some
    asylum applicants), allowing receipt of the EITC.
    • The high welfare use of illegal immigrant households is not explained by an
    unwillingness to work. In fact, 94 percent of illegal immigrant households have at least
    one worker, compared to only 73 percent of U.S.-born households. But the nation’s
    welfare system is design to help low-wage workers with children, which describes a very
    large share of illegal immigrant households.
    • In addition to consuming welfare, illegal immigration makes significant use of public
    education. Based on average costs per student, the estimated 4 million children of illegal
    immigrants in public schools created $68.1 billion in costs in 2019. The vast majority of
    these children are U.S.-born.
    • Use of emergency medical services is another area in which illegal immigrants create
    significant fiscal costs. Prior research indicates that there are 5.8 million uninsured illegal
    immigrants in the country in 2019, accounting for a little over one-fifth of the total
    population without health insurance. The costs of providing care to them likely totals
    some $7 billion annually.
    • Illegal immigrants do pay some taxes. We estimate that illegal immigrants in 2019 paid
    roughly $5.9 billion in federal income tax, $16.2 billion in Social Security tax and $3.8
    billion in Medicaid taxes. However, as the net fiscal drain of $68,000 per person cited
    above indicates, these taxes are not nearly enough to cover the cost of the services they
    receive.
    • Illegal immigrants do add perhaps $321 billion to the nation’s GDP, but this is not a
    measure of their tax contributions or the benefits they create for the U.S.-born. Almost all
    the increase in economic activity goes to the illegal immigrants themselves in the form of
    wages.

    https://budget.house.gov/imo/media/doc/ … payers.pdf

    1. Willowarbor profile image60
      Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      I appreciate  this report.  But It does not address the impact to the economy if 10 million people were deported.  Who would fill the jobs?  It does not address the consequences of a large number of unfilled positions in crucial industries.

      Basic supply and demand theory tells us that in the short run, employers would be scrambling to fill those jobs and would have to increase wages to attract native workers. Given the relatively tight labor market in the U.S., with unemployment under 4 percent, it would be difficult to fill so many jobs all at once. In addition, it’s not clear that native workers would be willing to take those jobs without a significant hike in wages, particularly in jobs in agriculture, construction, and janitorial services where employers can pay undocumented immigrants lower wages.


      The measured economic hit from losing those roughly 10 million workers: a reduction of $1.6 trillion in America’s GDP.


      It also doesn't take into account the massive costs to taxpayers for a large scale deportation. Some estimate that it would cost half a trillion dollars in new spending.

      The report also does not address our aging population, lower birth rates and shrinking labor force.

      "America’s falling birthrate and the retirement of Baby Boomers. U.S. elected officials must decide whether to change immigration laws and policies to bolster America’s labor force and prevent decline. Without continued net inflows of immigrants, the U.S. working-age population will shrink over the next two decades and by 2040, the United States will have over 6 million fewer working-age people than in 2022,”

      Pathways to citizenship for these people or deportation?  The choice is clear for me.

      https://www.forbes.com/sites/stuartande … mmigrants/

      1. Readmikenow profile image94
        Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I think they should all become citizens.

        They need to go through the process just like my relatives and thousands of people do each year.

        I'm not too worried about businesses.  Many companies are authorized to process thousands of worker visas.  Those people are here legally and there is no problem.

        Companies who want to break the law that others follow should be prosecuted.

        1. Willowarbor profile image60
          Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          The great thing about immigration policy... It doesn't have to remain the same as times change.  Congress can choose to get together and make needed changes.  Common sense changes. We are currently in a labor shortage.  9.5 million job openings but only 6.5 million unemployed workers.  It makes no sense to exacerbate that fact.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            What is the message sent out if we simply grant amnesty to all 30,000,000 or so illegals?  Does it shout out that we are a nation of laws, or that convenience overrides our laws?  Does it say we will protect ourselves from invasion or invite another (actually a continuation) one?

            It makes absolutely no sense to exacerbate the idiocy we have already shown for the past few decades, OR to once more repeat the stupid actions that produced what we are seeing today.

            Perhaps a compromise is in order?

          2. Ken Burgess profile image73
            Ken Burgessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            We aren't in a labor shortage.

            We are in a CHEAP labor shortage... why pay an American $20 hour, pay insurance, pay workers compensation, give vacations... when we can hire illegal migrants $10 hour and leave it to the government to supply social care services.

      2. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Losing 5 million illegal workers will result in a loss of 1.6T in our GDP?  That's $320,000 per worker.  I find it quite difficult to accept that illegal aliens working in the US average $320,000 per worker.

        Acknowledging, however, that every dollar earned has a "life" far more than its value, we might figure that each illegal only has to earn one hundred thousand to produce that lofty figure.  I don't believe that, either - do you?

        1. Readmikenow profile image94
          Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          We need to take into consideration the amount of money spent on their benefits.

          "Based on their use rate of major welfare programs, we estimate that illegal immigrants receive $42 billion in benefits, or about 4 percent of the total cost of the cash, Medicaid, food and housing programs examined in our study."

        2. Willowarbor profile image60
          Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          "Removing all undocumented immigrants would cause the labor force to shrink by 6.4 percent, which translates to a loss of 11 million workers. As a result, 20 years from now the economy would be nearly 6 percent or $1.6 trillion smaller than it would be if the government did not remove all undocumented immigrants."

          I don't think it's a great long-term strategy for our country especially with all the unfilled jobs we currently have. Anecdotally, I feel the lack of staffing in numerous businesses I frequent.

          Undocumented immigrants comprise a significant portion of our labor force. Deporting all of these individuals will have huge negative effects on the economy as a whole. Industries that rely on undocumented labor will be devastated. Our population and workforce is aging, putting more pressure on Social Security and Medicare as these older workers retire.  Additionally, our younger generations are having fewer children. We are going to have a smaller working age population in the future. Bottom line, we need these people.


          https://www.americanactionforum.org/res … z8cxvQFfnR

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Simply put, I disagree.  Yes, illegal aliens are a significant portion of our labor force and yes, companies that violate our laws, and have for years, in hiring them will suffer.  Boo hoo - if you cannot follow the law in your business we don't need it.

            Best guess is that there are around 20M illegals in the country.  That does NOT equate with 11 million workers, not when illegal aliens average larger families than citizens.  As usual these "estimates" seem overstated by whichever bias is seen in the speaker (get rid of them, keep them).

            Bottom line remains the same, though - we have historically given amnesty to illegal alien workers (and their families) over and over.  If that's all we're going to do, why have the laws at all?  For political purposes?  To satisfy the rest of the world? 

            I'm pretty much sick of watching as we ignore the laws of our nation in favor of political posturing.  We allow massive rioting every year disguised as "demonstrating".  Theft is rampant and getting worse.  Vandalism is accepted as "boys will be boys".  While more violent crime (rape, murder, etc) rises and falls it is far greater than it used to be.

            We're either a nation of law and order or we are a nation of anarchy.  I know which I want, and ignoring our law in political expediency is not it.

          2. Readmikenow profile image94
            Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            The deportation of illegal immigrants would also save money.

            "Based on their use rate of major welfare programs, we estimate that illegal immigrants receive $42 billion in benefits, or about 4 percent of the total cost of the cash

            Prior research indicates that there are 5.8 million uninsured illegal
            immigrants in the country in 2019, accounting for a little over one-fifth of the total population without health insurance. The costs of providing care to them likely totals some $7 billion annually.

            Those two things alone could save the United States almost $50 Billion annually.  The deportations will pay for themselves.

            1. Willowarbor profile image60
              Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              Yeah but who will fill the jobs they've been yanked from?   The loss of 11 million workers when we are already experiencing a labor shortage.  How will we get the natives interested in food processing, agriculture and the like?  And if those jobs go unfilled, which they undoubtedly would because they are jobs Americans don't want to do, what will be the impact on the rest of us?  If the meat packing plant can't staff the killing floor, what happens to the price of meat?   
              Address the loss of jobs in crucial industries. If Trump plans to deport 10 or 11 million people, what is the plan to fill their jobs?  Also, what happens to the mortgages that these people hold?  Where are the rest of the details in this grand scheme? Folks seem to be under the impression that you can take 10 million working people out of our economy and there will be no repercussions.
              As if businesses can lose a large number of workers and continue on like nothing happened.  This whole deportation plan is nothing more than red meat for an unwitting base.

              1. Readmikenow profile image94
                Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                I think those businesses will then have to start following the law.  They'll have to get guest worker visas like other companies and keep records.  IF a company is getting by with illegal immigrants as a workforce, they are not following the law.  I see only good things come from such deportations.

                President Eisenhower deported hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants in 1954.

                The left doesn't seem to comprehend the importance of a secure border or American citizenship.

              2. Miebakagh57 profile image69
                Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                I've said it that the USA is not a third world country.                                    It advanced industrially with immigrant labour, and reach it's zenith in the 60's.                                 Who are going to take over or handle the depotee jobs is still the question.                                That said, let me illustrate. Nigeria, my country is a great countrx, but still in the third world category.                                 Three  decades ago, late Ex-President Shehu Shangari, depoted all Ghana citizens living and working illegally in Nigeria. They jobs being mostly manual were take over by locals till todate.

                1. Readmikenow profile image94
                  Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Thankyou for your input.

                  That example does help make a powerful point on the topic.

                  It is fascinating that Nigeria is still considered a third-world country.

                  It is one of the wealthiest countries in Africa.  Its GDP is greater than Egypt and South Africa.

                  What do you think would need to happen for Nigeria to leave the status of a third world country?

                  1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
                    Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Mike, you said my example don't make a significant 'point' on the topic?                                         OMG that's your America or 'advance' industrialization thinking. Heads up anyway.                                   And you heard me ask 'where's Nathanville' that fine Englishman, who can be very versed with the American Industrian Revolution, right?                                 And I know that I know how the USA become a top 'first' industrial nation by 1900. You copy English technology and innovations, or it was stolen and sold to you. And you later improved and innovated on that, right?                                             Again, and if Nigeria,has to leave a third world status, with borrowed or transfered, or bought technology, then she become one of the Big Boys. So those who will be willing to transfer they ropes had to stay in my country for decades before leaving. Otherwise,it'll be a doom.

            2. Ken Burgess profile image73
              Ken Burgessposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              The influx of immigration is not a mistake or happenstance.

              This is deliberate effort made by parties funded and directed by the UN as well as NGOs... it is supported indirectly by the Biden Administration and always has been, that they are taking measures to slow the flow right now is only because of the coming election, they will reverse course after November.

              Its all part of a greater Open Society - Open Borders, Agenda 2030 effort.

              You know, the whole no more National Sovereignty issue I mention from time to time:

              Humanity Must Act Urgently to Avert Total Global Catastrophe, Secretary-General Warns General Assembly, Outlining 2023 Priorities for United Nations
              https://press.un.org/en/2023/ga12489.doc.htm

              The U.N.’s Latest Proposals Would Undermine U.S. Sovereignty
              https://www.heritage.org/global-politic … overeignty

              Responding to Global Shocks: UNSG’s Emergency Platform
              https://www.stimson.org/2023/the-un-eme … ultiplier/

              The whole, get around the Constitution thing by creating an International Agency that has even 'more' authority... pretty smart... and totalitarian.

              The links are a progressive read, in the last (I quote):

              "the United Nations in 1945 in San Francisco and how the world body is actually structured. With the ultimate goal of “sav[ing] succeeding generations from the scourge of war."

              They haven't done a smash up job of it, have they?

              1. Willowarbor profile image60
                Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                Do you believe that there will be no repercussions from deporting 10 or 11 million people who will leave behind jobs? Mortgages? Just in terms of the jobs that will be vacated, who will fill them?   We are currently in a labor market shortage, I can provide a multitude of data that supports that.  If there is disagreement on that fact, what data backs that up?

                Current  the United States has 9.5 million job openings but only 6.5 million unemployed.  How will Mass deportations impact that reality?

                No one here has addressed the jobs that will be left open and the consequences that all of us will feel if the majority of them are not filled.

                After this data is years old and I assume the numbers have risen..

                "More than 3.4 million undocumented immigrants are homeowners, according to the Migration Policy Institute analysis of the 2014 U.S. census data. That’s about 31 percent of the undocumented population."

                What impact would Mass deportation have in the housing arena? What happens to all those mortgages? Mass default?

                https://www.uschamber.com/workforce/und … r-shortage

  10. Kathleen Cochran profile image75
    Kathleen Cochranposted 4 weeks ago

    The question is not what percent of Americans want the problem of immigration addressed. The question is what percent of republicans in congress want the problem addressed. Progress was on the table. They walked away. If they think they can now campaign on the issue, they must thing Americans have the shortest memories ever.

  11. Kathleen Cochran profile image75
    Kathleen Cochranposted 4 weeks ago

    think

    1. Readmikenow profile image94
      Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      If the democrats want to make an issue of the horrible bill that was turned down by both democrats and Republicans, I welcome it.

      I hope the democrats bring that up often.

      It will provide an opportunity to show where the minds of the democrats are when it comes to immigration.

      I encourage it.

      1. abwilliams profile image62
        abwilliamsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Amen Mike. I second that, "I encourage it".

      2. Willowarbor profile image60
        Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        How many Democrats voted against the bill?

        1. Willowarbor profile image60
          Willowarborposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          "It will provide an opportunity to show where the minds of the democrats are when it comes to immigration.'

          The majority of Democrats voted for the bill though?  I'm beginning to think that a lot of factual news is not getting through to a segment of our population.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
            Miebakagh57posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Why then was not the  Mahattam Court case, in which Ex-President Donalt Trump, was tried in the infamous  actress  Daniels hush money trial televised?                                          Is that not denying the public the factual information or good news they need, though?

  12. Kathleen Cochran profile image75
    Kathleen Cochranposted 4 weeks ago

    It was heavily favored by republicans until Trump said it would help Biden. Shameless. Pay attention America.

    1. Readmikenow profile image94
      Readmikenowposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Then democrats were influenced by President Donald Trump as many also didn't want the bill put up for a vote.

      Is that possible?  Why wouldn't democrats want the bill put up for a vote?

  13. Kathleen Cochran profile image75
    Kathleen Cochranposted 4 weeks ago

    The Associated Press "most Senate Democrats again supported the procedural vote to begin debate on the border bill, but it failed to advance 43-50 after all but one Republican, Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, voted against it."

  14. Valeant profile image84
    Valeantposted 4 weeks ago

    Just the latest example of Trump supporters not understanding state laws.

     
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