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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (12 posts)

Are sexless marriages considered a sin & do factors matter?

  1. strkngfang profile image78
    strkngfangposted 4 years ago

    Are sexless marriages considered a sin & do factors matter?

    Most agree that sex outside of marriage is wrong, but what about the opposite, no sex inside of a marriage?

  2. lupine profile image73
    lupineposted 4 years ago

    It depends on the reasons for this type of marriage. Is it because of health reasons, or a marriage of convenience? I don't consider it a sin, but if there's no sex, the marriage has not been consummated.

    1. strkngfang profile image78
      strkngfangposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Most don't start out this way, so I'm sure in the beginning they were consummated. Desire, sex drive diminishes if the couple begin to grow apart. The majority aren't done maliciously.

    2. lupine profile image73
      lupineposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      If it didn't start out this way, and diminished with time... it could be considered normal. The desire may not be there due to many factors, but if there is still love in a respectable marriage, it can happen again. "It takes two"...

  3. lostdogrwd profile image59
    lostdogrwdposted 4 years ago

    I been here and being married and lonely and sexually frustrated  is insane. I still love my wife at that time but she did not feel the same until now nine years later but she still haven't fix her selfishness and as I move on but still love her and a child, thing change and unless the person have some type of life mental problem. if there no intimacy in the marriage than it outside with someone else

    1. lupine profile image73
      lupineposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Ideally, a sexual relationship would be with your wife. If it's been years and years...you still love her, and your child, and nothing...then I guess she knows you have to find it elsewhere.

  4. peeples profile image94
    peeplesposted 4 years ago

    There are very few excuses for a sexless marriage. It is also very rare that both parties become suddenly not interested in sex. It happens for many reasons, but really the whole problem is communication. Sex should be discussed often. Expectations, needs, wants, requirements all need to be discussed. Even someone who has suddenly lost the ability to move half of their body has the ability to sexually satisfy their partner if they really want to. Denying sex because you aren't able or willing to communicate is the equivalent of going outside the marriage for sex in my opinion.

    1. lostdogrwd profile image59
      lostdogrwdposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      like your word, but I see many people have been down this road and I do pray that communication will help fro relationship with someone you love is better than mindless I'm get her sex for that kind just don't satisfy you for long .

  5. dashingscorpio profile image86
    dashingscorpioposted 4 years ago

    It's highly doubtful anyone would say NOT having sex is a "sin".
    The bottom line is whatever takes place or does not take place in a marriage is completely acceptable as long as BOTH people are happy with it.
    Naturally if one person is suffering in silence that is not to be mistaken for being "happy". However each of us entitled to have our own "deal breakers". Personally speaking I would file for divorce and find a mate who is much more sexually compatible.

  6. wychic profile image89
    wychicposted 4 years ago

    I'd say it's not a sin, but it is darn frustrating for the partner who DOES want sex. Unfortunately, it seems to be a fairly common issue at some point in most marriages, yet it's not talked about. I've tried looking online for resources on the subject, and it's mostly sites of people in sexless marriages looking to "satisfy themselves" with other people. Of course, sex outside of marriage even in this case is something I'd personally still consider immoral.

    That all said, I'm still deciding how I feel about a partner who doesn't participate in sex. In my own case, my husband cites feeling too tired and drug-out because of the kids, and therefore doesn't even put out the effort. Understandably (I think), I spent months trying to figure out what's wrong with me and how I could get his attention. He promises that "eventually," when the kids get older, he will have more energy and effort to give in this regard. Though I know he has a lot going on in his mind, I still can't reconcile that with completely shutting out sexual intimacy of any kind. I'd say it's at least important to talk about it, because it is very damaging to the self-esteem and confidence of the shut-out partner. I don't consider it a sin, but it's terrible on the marriage if both people aren't on board with it.

    1. strkngfang profile image78
      strkngfangposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I believe if a couple can go long periods of time without sex, for whatever reason, they aren't very close.  Intimacy should be something you want & not something you "pencil" in when you have time or energy. If you don't "want" it something is w

    2. wychic profile image89
      wychicposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'd even settle for penciling in smile. It'd be easy to dismiss the marriage if it were that lacking in everything, but sex is really the only thing that isn't there. We talk all the time, snuggle, etc. Harder to reconcile that way, unfortunately.

 
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