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With islam as fastest growing jesus wuld become only messenger?

  1. pisean282311 profile image60
    pisean282311posted 5 years ago

    Jesus was considered false messiah by majority among people who had heard about jesus till romans accepted christianity...then he became accepted saviour,god by majority who heard about him etc...then came muhammad who named jesus as mere messenger of allah...so there became six kind of people in the world

    a) Those who believe jesus as god/saviour
    b) Those who believe jesus as messenger of allah
    c) those who believe jesus as false messiah
    d) those who have never heard of jesus and dont care who the hell he was
    e) those who think he is fiction character and never existed
    f) those who think he was normal hippy kind of nice guy who was elevated to something which he never was

    now with islam being fastest growing religion in the world...do u think 100 yrs down the line majority in world would believe jesus to be messenger of allah or associate him with islam...specially d,e,f ,a category ones....

    1. Quilligrapher profile image88
      Quilligrapherposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good evening, Pisean.  How are you today?

      Yes, the Muslim population in the world has indeed been growing. However, the rate of growth over the next twenty years is projected to be slower than the previous two decades. In 1990, Muslims represented about 19.9% of the world’s population. This segment grew by 3.5% by 2010 but it is expected to grow only 3% by 2030.

      While the global Muslim population is expected to grow at a faster rate than the non-Muslim population, the Muslim population nevertheless is expected to grow at a slower pace in the next two decades than it did in the previous two decades. {1}
      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/7262436_f248.jpg
      No one can predict what the world will be like 100 years from now. It is possible Iran will launch a nuclear attack that could destroy large numbers of Muslims. Never the less, based upon the recent growth forecast of 1.5% per year, Islam, as a religion, will still be a large minority religion in 2110. Therefore, I think it safe to say more than half of all the people in the world will be in category (a) and professing they believe Jesus is their God/Savior.

      Thank you, Pisean, for this interesting thread. Peace.
      {1} http://www.pewforum.org/The-Future-of-t … ation.aspx

      1. pisean282311 profile image60
        pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

        @quilling have u counted no of people leaving christianity?....europe is seeing decline ...if we count that and rise of islam , how do u see it?

        1. Quilligrapher profile image88
          Quilligrapherposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Assalamu Alaikum, Pisean.

          Yes, the research has considered net conversions to Islam. While there is ample evidence the Muslim population is growing, net conversions do not seem to be the cause. The study conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life arrived at this conclusion. “What little information is available suggests that there is no substantial net gain or loss in the number of Muslims through conversion globally; the number of people who become Muslims through conversion seems to be roughly equal to the number of Muslims who leave the faith.” {1}

          The same data indicate “In the United States, for example, the population projections show the number of Muslims more than doubling over the next two decades, rising from 2.6 million in 2010 to 6.2 million in 2030, in large part because of immigration and higher-than-average fertility among Muslims.”

          Therefore, Pisean, if we rely on the current data until new studies are conducted, it would appear that the rate of conversions is NOT a major factor in the global projections of Muslim population growth.

          Stay well, Pisean, and always follow your bliss.
          Q.
          {1} http://www.pewforum.org/future-of-the-g … rsion.aspx

          1. pisean282311 profile image60
            pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

            thanks for reply

  2. Xenonlit profile image59
    Xenonlitposted 5 years ago

    My belief is that Jesus had many sheep to tend. He came to many people under many names and with may styles and looks. Why do we always manage to get it so wrong?

    1. pisean282311 profile image60
      pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @Xenonlit who got it wrong?...everyone?

  3. profile image0
    khmohsinposted 5 years ago

    It is no doubt that Islam is the fastest growing religion in the whole world because of its reality. Islam is not  a religion but the way of life so every researcher wants to adopt its rules. So far as the Jesus is concerned he is only the messenger. How it can be a man belongs to Allah almighty. It is just the misconception about the christianity. All is clear in the Luca's Bible that Muhammad is the only saviour to mankind.

    1. Mark Knowles profile image60
      Mark Knowlesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Actually - Islam is not really growing at all. It appears that Muslims  just have a lot of children and then force them to be Muslim.

      Is it true the penalty for children wanting to leave Islam is death?

      No one in their right mind would wish to adopt this religion.

      Is it true you still murder women for adultery?

    2. pisean282311 profile image60
      pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @mohsin reality or natural cycle?...religions grow not because of realities dude.....it is normal cycle...if u think religions grow because of reality then u must admit that christianity is most real religion even today since jesus died...because no religion has grown so much as christianity....but it is always a cycle under which religion grow and decline...

  4. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    I don't know what people will think of Jesus in 100 years, but I can't imagine a psychologically sound and educated person converting to Islam (no offense intended to any Muslims. This is just my opinion). So, any growth trends should reverse as countries become liberated and educated.

    1. pisean282311 profile image60
      pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @emile surprisingly maixmum converts islam gets is from europe and usa....

      1. Quilligrapher profile image88
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Pisean,
        Please tell me where you found this information. Thank you.
        Q.

        1. pisean282311 profile image60
          pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this
          1. A Troubled Man profile image61
            A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Did you read that article? Funny how so many of the reasons people are converting to Islam really has nothing to do with Islam and more to do with their own personal wants, how they view society as being corrupted, or as an accessory to the rest of their fashion sense. It's actually laughable.

            What was interesting is this frightening little gem here...

            "This trend has taken on a very threatening quality toward our security, and while not every convert is a potential terrorist, we are facing a sort of homegrown terrorism that has sprouted in our own backyard," according to Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble.

            Many European coverts to Islam on fact become vastly more pious than Muslims who were born into Islam. Such converts, taking an absolutist approach, are often easily led into extremism."

            1. pisean282311 profile image60
              pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

              ya true...i know it is not about islam but emile's claim was that education and liberated country would have less converts but things are shockingly opposite...

    2. Quilligrapher profile image88
      Quilligrapherposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hello Emile. Thank you for your input. It is thought provoking to say the least.

      Your opinion that Islam would not appeal to a “psychologically sound and educated person” is, despite your “no offense intended,” an insult to Muslims because it is so blatantly untrue. Furthermore, religious conversions in general are actually more common in societies that are better educated and enjoy high levels of religious plurality.

      A paper titled “Religious Conversion in 40 Countries” by Harvard University’s Robert J. Barro and others, uses empirical analysis to gauge the frequency of religious change at the country level by the fraction of the adhering population that undergoes a religious conversion by age 30. “The model predicts that this religious-conversion rate will be higher if:
      * a country has a higher level of religious pluralism,
      * a country shifted recently toward greater religious pluralism,
      * a country lacks legal and religious restrictions on conversion,
      * a country lacks a history of Communism, and
      * a country has higher average educational attainment." {1}

      Therefore, your highly personal prediction that “any growth trends should reverse as countries become liberated and educated” appears to be unsupported by available data. The recent growth rate of the Muslim population is expected to decline, not reverse, and most certainly not due to the reasons you stated. 

      Thank you, Emile, for sharing your opinions with us. I find it valuable to know what others think.
      Q.
      {1} http://www.economics.harvard.edu/facult … %2B_2_.pdf

      1. pisean282311 profile image60
        pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

        wow...thanks for your inputs...

      2. A Troubled Man profile image61
        A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Yes, the paper indicates that conversion amongst the better educated is a higher conversion rate out of religion as opposed to conversion to another religion.

        1. Quilligrapher profile image88
          Quilligrapherposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Hey there, ATM. Nice to chat with you again.

          The paper does make a couple of interesting observations regarding conversion rates related to education but I see nothing correlating national levels of education to conversions to “No Religion.” If you did, please point me to the data. I do not find anything that supports your statement.

          I do find, however, this statement by the authors: “Our present empirical investigation relates not to changes in overall religiosity but rather to shifts of affiliation among persons professing some kind of religious adherence. {5} 

          Table 2 contains the tabulated responses from the three surveys in which 21.1-% to 30.2-% of the respondents, aged 30 and over in all countries, claimed no religious adherence. In all three cases, the data shows more conversions from “None” to another religious group than switching from religions to “None” {6}{7}

          Other observations relating to education include:

          “More educated people likely find it easier to change religions because they are better at learning and adjusting to new ways of thinking. The better educated tend also to have more information about alternative religions and more contact with people of other religions." {1}

          “Education has been argued to raise the benefits of religion through its social-networking role (Glaeser and Sacerdote [2008]). This argument suggests that more education would multiply the benefit received from the social networks offered by all religions.” {2}

          “This coefficient implies that a one-standard-deviation increase in educational attainment (by 1.6 years in the regression sample, see Table 4) raises the estimated religious-conversion rate by about 40%.” {3}

          “Sherkat’s findings (2004, p. 618) accord with Lehrer’s in that higher levels of educational attainment correlate with higher rates of intermarriage, particularly for women. Sherkat (p. 620) also reports that higher levels of educational attainment for women are correlated with distance of intermarriage; that is, better educated women tend to look geographically farther away for a satisfactory mate.” {4}

          Thank you, ATM, for making your point. I am looking forward to your pointing to your supporting data. 
          Q.
          {1} http://www.economics.harvard.edu/facult … 2B_2_.pdf, p.6
          {2} Ibid. p.8.
          {3} Ibid. p.26.
          {4} Ibid. p.7, footnote 3.
          {5} Ibid. p.13.
          {6} Ibid. p.39, Table 1.
          {7} Ibid. p.40, Table 2.

      3. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Thanks for the info. smile As I said, it was only my opinion and if anyone chooses to be offended by my personal opinion I don't suppose it is in my power to stop them.

        I would never take it upon myself to argue with what you might consider to be experts, but anecdotal evidence I have acquired over the years leads me to stand behind my original comment.

        Nice talking to you. smile

  5. ahorseback profile image74
    ahorsebackposted 5 years ago

    Once again the brilliant minds of the godless intelligectuals speak out against Jesus , Oh my look at this though  , they do include muslims in their distaste for spirituality !

  6. ahorseback profile image74
    ahorsebackposted 5 years ago

    And wow !....... They can even use charts and  alphabetical lists to " prove " It all , oh thank you for enlightening us mere  lowly believers in faith .

    1. Mark Knowles profile image60
      Mark Knowlesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Guess you were too busy hating spirituality to notice the guy with the charts is a fully paid-up member of your irrational belief system (sorry - faith lol)..........

    2. pisean282311 profile image60
      pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @ahorseback u didnt answer the question....please read question and answer...

  7. LeanMan profile image88
    LeanManposted 5 years ago

    Most Christians are so in name only and really could not give a fig about religion as they are chasing their true religion everyday which is MONEY! Most people in the west are not religious, it is a tiny minority that have strong views most people are too busy to care!

    Before money became so important in the west many people went to church every week (even daily) and you still see this in every poor country in the world.

    What will happen in all of these Muslim counties as they start to spend more time working and chasing after material things? They will start to spend their Fridays in front of their 50 inch TV going through their household accounts rather than going to the mosque is what!

    Religion only grows truly in poor countries, elsewhere the majority of the people just get on with their lives and struggling to make ends meet each month.

    1. Mark Knowles profile image60
      Mark Knowlesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Money always was important. It was just the Church that collected it and provided the entertainment. Just go to Naples and see the poor giving their last centimes to the Church. The only difference is who collects the money - now it is MSNBC.

      The entertainment seems much the same. wink

      1. pisean282311 profile image60
        pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

        lol

    2. pisean282311 profile image60
      pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      trend?

  8. profile image0
    khmohsinposted 5 years ago

    I believe Jesus as messenger of Allah. And the muslims' also believe as a messenger of Allah just like the Muhammad. God sent him for the well being of mankind

    1. pisean282311 profile image60
      pisean282311posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @khmohsin so 100 yrs down the line , do u think majority would consider him messenger like majority consider him god today?

 
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