jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (7 posts)

How do conservative Christians rationalize helping the poor get healthcare?

  1. Kathleen Cochran profile image82
    Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years ago

    How do conservative Christians rationalize helping the poor get healthcare?

    Instructed by Christ to feed the poor, care for widows and orphans, give your cloak to one without one, where is the instruction to stop widespread, affordable care for the sick?

  2. J - R - Fr13m9n profile image77
    J - R - Fr13m9nposted 3 years ago

    This is an irony in our political system and the United States doctrine of beliefs. "We The People" is an exclamation stating our rights as human beings. There is a shortsidedness in some politicians thinking when the subject of "Universal Healthcare" is raised. If people are not treated for illnesses then the circumstances can exacerbate producing an epidemic.

    1. Kathleen Cochran profile image82
      Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe I should have phrased the question, how do they rationalize not helping the poor get health care?

  3. Besarien profile image85
    Besarienposted 3 years ago

    Society pays one way or another. We pay dearly for our apathy if we do nothing. Being a Christian means I am always in favor of helping the poor. I would rather do that in a super smart way that includes preventative medicine that increases quality of life than the dumb way with the costs of their multiple emergency room visits spread around to increase everyone else's health care costs.

  4. Kathleen Cochran profile image82
    Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years ago

    Why aren't there more answers being posted to this question?  People feel strongly that they want The Affordable Health Care Act repealed.  How do they justify their feelings if they are Christians directed to help those in need?  Churches for the most part do not provide medical services.  How are these folks to be taken care of other than a national program like this?

  5. JayeWisdom profile image91
    JayeWisdomposted 3 years ago

    Did you intend to ask, "...rationalize NOT helping the poor....?"

    All of the conservative Christians I personally know are Republicans who spout the party line and loudly complain that taxpayers foot the bill for any government-sponsored social welfare program, such as food stamps and Medicaid--anything that helps the poor, homeless, unemployed, veterans, needy children, elderly, etc., all of whom are presumed to be just lazy layabouts who refuse to pull themselves up out of poverty by their bootstraps.  These people also vociferously protest the Affordable Care Act (derisively referred to as 'Obamacare') and want to have it repealed with the help of the Tea Party bunch.

    (Remember, please, that I live in the poorest state in the U.S., Mississippi, where the R. governor fights anything and everything that might help the state's economy or any of its citizens other than his affluent white male Republican cohorts and their Stepford wives and children. I know I'm cynical, but it's how I manage to live here and maintain my sanity.)

    These are the same people who frequently proclaim their piety and quote biblical scripture on social networks, in casual conversations and on bumper stickers. I fail to understand how they can reconcile their vaunted religious beliefs with a determination to NOT help the poor, especially when the teachings of Jesus focused heavily on caring for those who need help and were demonstrated by example.

    I know I didn't really answer your question. I've been wondering the same thing myself for years. The word 'hypocrisy' springs to mind.

    1. Kathleen Cochran profile image82
      Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      In metro Atlanta I'm surrounded by people of the same mindset.  I know they are sincere in their beliefs.  I know they think their hearts are in the right place.  I don't understand what they tell themselves to justify their opposition.

 
working