British Parliament debate on Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

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  1. profile image58
    paarsurreyposted 7 years ago

    Ahmadiyya Community — [Annette Brooke in the Chair]
    Westminster Hall debates, 20 October 2010, 2:30 pm

    Siobhain McDonagh:

    "Britain's Ahmadiyya Muslims work hard and contribute greatly to this country. Their belief in peace and religious tolerance is an example to us all, and is to be expected from a community whose motto is, "Love for all and hatred for none." Their fifth spiritual head, Mirza Masroor Ahmad, lives in the United Kingdom, and their headquarters are in south London.
    Indeed, one of the world's biggest Ahmadi mosques is in Morden. It has capacity for 10,000 people, which means that I have many Ahmadi constituents, as do many neighbouring seats. I am pleased to say that we now have the backing of enough parliamentarians to start up an all-party parliamentary group for the Ahmadiyyan community, and we will hold our first ever meeting in the next few weeks.

    http://www.theyworkforyou.com/whall/?id … -20a.284.0

    1. dutchman1951 profile image61
      dutchman1951posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      so much for seperation of church and State

      1. thooghun profile image82
        thooghunposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        You should have read the article big_smile

        "In a similar vein, Ahmadis believe that theirs is the only Islamic organisation to endorse a separation of mosque and state and to champion the empowerment and education of women."

        1. dutchman1951 profile image61
          dutchman1951posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I did read it. they say a lot, but what is actualy practiced?  smile

          you would have to visit, observe and then make judgements after you watched them for a while to see if it is in fact what is advertised.

          I do think they are ok, but church would be a part of their decision making, it is just not seperate in religions, never has been and beliefes are in-grained, so it would be in there. Just like it is for christians also.

          but if it is very peacefull then there is hope. But I would not judge by an article but by their actions and deeds, not words.

          it takes time.

          1. profile image58
            paarsurreyposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            You are welcome to visit an Ahmadiyya mosque near you; meet with the people and have a prolonged association with them. No harm in trying it. Take your own time, please

            1. dutchman1951 profile image61
              dutchman1951posted 7 years agoin reply to this

              where is one around nashville Tenn, USA Paar?  would be an interesting visit

              Jon

              1. profile image58
                paarsurreyposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                Mosques/centers: Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam, USA
                This collection contains mosques and centers of Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam, US


                http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?f=l& … &msa=0

                I think it would help; and you will find one near you.

                Thanks

      2. EmpressFelicity profile image71
        EmpressFelicityposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        This debate took place in Britain.  We don't have separation of Church and State in Britain.  Although bizarrely (with certain exceptions like Northern Ireland) it seems to be much easier to live a religion-free life in Britain than it does in the US, at least if the forum debates on here are anything to go by.

        1. dutchman1951 profile image61
          dutchman1951posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          I agree Empress, I am in US and it is hard to seperate at times.

  2. profile image58
    paarsurreyposted 7 years ago

    Siobhain McDonagh said:

    “The Ahmadiyya Muslim community was founded in 1889 and arose out of the belief that the long-awaited Messiah had come in the person of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian. Ahmad claimed to be the metaphorical second coming whose advent was foretold by Mohammed. Obviously, that contradicts the view of mainstream Muslims who believe that Mohammed is the last prophet. Nevertheless, the Ahmadiyya Muslim community is a very peaceful religion. They believe that there are parallels between Ahmad and Jesus, as God sent both to end religious wars, contend bloodshed and bring peace. For instance, they reject terrorism in any form. Ahmad declared that jihad by the sword had no place in Islam. Instead, he wanted his followers to wage a bloodless, intellectual jihad of the pen to defend Islam.”

    http://www.theyworkforyou.com/whall/?id … -20a.284.0


    Ahmadiyya Community — [Annette Brooke in the Chair]
    Westminster Hall debates, 20 October 2010, 2:30 pm

  3. profile image58
    paarsurreyposted 7 years ago

    Siobhain McDonagh said:

    I am a Catholic and we are as guilty as anyone. A Catholic pope promised heaven to mediaeval thugs who took part in murderous crusades against followers of a prophet whom they believed was false-Mohammed. That period of history continues to haunt us. This country is not immune to using discrimination against religions we have not liked, with Catholics on this occasion often being the victims.

    It is only a few years ago that I helped to change the law to allow former Catholic priests to become MPs. Although that law was a throwback to a much earlier time, there are, even in our more recent history, examples of discrimination of which we should not be proud, particularly in Northern Ireland.

    It is hard therefore to stand here and lecture other countries about their practices, and we need to remain humble. The fact that religions have been persecuting each other for centuries does not make it right, especially in Pakistan where extreme groups such as the Taliban are already very active in creating a lot of volatility.

    We are lucky in this country in that, on the whole, our religions can carry on side by side without conflict, respecting each other's right to worship. In Pakistan, most mainstream Muslims are horrified that anything could happen to their fellow countrymen just because they have a different religion. They are as shocked as we are by attacks such as those in Lahore. However, discrimination is an everyday reality for many Ahmadis living in Pakistan, and it is embedded in the Pakistani constitution.

    http://www.theyworkforyou.com/whall/?id … -20a.284.0

    Ahmadiyya Community — [Annette Brooke in the Chair]
    Westminster Hall debates, 20 October 2010, 2:30 pm

 
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