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Blessed, only if I believe...

  1. mischeviousme profile image60
    mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago

    If I decide to be a christian, they say "bless you". Sometimes they say it when I've done something kind for another. But what happens when I choose not to believe? Is it not then, an empty blessing?

    1. Disappearinghead profile image78
      Disappearingheadposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      "Bless you" today is nothing more than a conversational pleasantry device designed to invoke feelings of inner warmth and gratitude. Believe or don't believe a "Bless you" will not magically invoke God's favour upon you.

      1. mischeviousme profile image60
        mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        But if I don't believe, then I'm damned. So why even say it in the first place? I do understand the value of the pleasantry, though for those that know I'm not religious, why even say it?

  2. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    You are such a busy little beaver. I agree with DH. Just a pleasantry. I don't think the believer is secretly assuming you are damned if you don't believe. It's spiritual bon homie. Don't read too much into it.

    1. mischeviousme profile image60
      mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm always pondering my spiritual mind, it puzzles me that I even have one. I come from a family, that does not promote their religiosity. Perhaps I'm not religious because I was exposed to God in so many forms. My parents didn't try to indoctrinate me with their beliefs, they left it open for me to decide for myself. Which, I must say, is much more appropriate than expecting that level of loyalty.

      1. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Well, and this is simply an observation. You might bring the judgmental nature of your opinions on Christianity down a notch or two. Your assessment of Christianity is not the same as a Christian. There is good in everything. There is also bad in everything. Pointing out the bad serves little purpose if you don't understand the good also. Those who cheerily end a conversation with 'God bless you'  rarely intend to inflict harm with their words.

        1. mischeviousme profile image60
          mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          I never said all christians, though it could be implied. I could say the same for most other, mainstream religious believers and you could always interpret it in the same light. It sounds as if I'm talking about all believers, that was not the intent. I have some respect, where respect is due.

          1. profile image0
            Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            If you only show respect, when you judge it to be due...then you start with the premise of no respect for others? So, you can be disrespectful, until an individual convinces you that it is due them?

            1. mischeviousme profile image60
              mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              Is trust not something to be earned? They don't respect me, not until I accept and internalize whatever it is their selling. This could be said on all sides, unless we agree, there is room for disagreement and bias of various degrees.

              1. profile image0
                Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

                But, by this statement you have already judged and convicted any who you label Christian. How, exactly, is your philosophy different from the philosophy (as you perceive it) of a Christian?

                1. mischeviousme profile image60
                  mischeviousmeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

                  I've never seen a buddhist damn someone... Have you? I'm not a buddhist, but I would never judge them for their belief. I converted a jew to christianity, and when I had decided to leave the faith, I realized that I had created a monster. He became one of the bad examples, judging and damning any who believed different. He is but one of many, though I know they don't account for all. Still the judgement is there, whether spoken or not. This is not to say that we all don't have social prejudices, we all judge others to some degree. The difference is in whether we can judge and still love the person we are judging. Does this sound reasonable?

                  1. profile image0
                    Emile Rposted 5 years agoin reply to this

                    No. Judgement is what it is. You can't know what is in the heart of another. Broad stroke statements prove we don't have faith in the hearts of others.

                    Your experience is not the experience of another. You can't perceive mistakes in your own actions and then condemn others because of wrongs you have done. And that is what you appear to be doing, when reading your post.

                    To say you sit in judgment, yet still love others, is the same spiel I hear from fundamental Christians. The actions are the same. So, I'm compelled to ask again. Exactly, how are you different?

    2. habee profile image96
      habeeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's pretty much what I'm thinking.

 
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