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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (7 posts)

What Are The Best Types Of Self Defense To Learn?

  1. PhoenixV profile image68
    PhoenixVposted 6 years ago

    What Are The Best Types Of Self Defense To Learn?

    What is the best type of Self Defense to study?

  2. lilnassau profile image78
    lilnassauposted 6 years ago

    Which ever suits your body structure. For example a thick strong person may consider Judo, a small thin person may consider Aikido, an energetic generally strong person may consider karate a flexible person may consider kung fu.

    There is no guarantee that any person will be great for any specific martial arts but it may be best that you try different styles to see which you like the best and you are good at.

    I started off in karate but it required to much energy and strength for a small person that i am, I then went to kung fu but found the stances difficult because of my lack of flexibility and then switched to ju-jitsu which was much more to my liking and easy being able to execute the techniques effortlessly.

  3. Rick Lenchus profile image60
    Rick Lenchusposted 6 years ago

    Legend Karate is made up of many styles starting with Shotokai/Kan to Goju and incorporates Aikido, Jujitsu, Tai-Chi, Baqua, Iaido and stick fighting. We have other guest instructors from all around giving seminars on Kung Fu and even sword fighting.

    But in answer to your question, I will ask a question.
    What is it YOU are looking for?
    Discipline?
    Confidence?
    Fighting?
    Exercise?

    Because we at the Legend teach you to fight so you don't have to fight.
    We teach you to resolve conflict non violently.
    We go into the history and philosophy, and have tea ceremonies as well as zen discussions.
    We search within our selves and try to find the root of things and to make good men and women better.

    If you think martial arts is the end all you may be wrong, and bought the Brooklyn Bridge, because no matter how good you become, this is not the movies, and the streets are un predictable.

    The MMA events are guys who work there butt off and stay in great shape, BUT in the street while you are wrestling with your foe, his friends are beating you over the head with pipes.
    They are never alone..

    ALL MARTIAL ARTS are good mentally, physically, and disciplined
    Find a teacher. Investigate their background and abilities. Get references. Then commit your self to at least 6 months to a year to become coordinated and sense if this is in fact for you,
    or should you get Mace?

  4. gramon1 profile image75
    gramon1posted 6 years ago

    There is no better self deffense or martial art. If you find a good instructor that teaches you to adapt the style to your body, you will thrive. Whatever dojo or academy you choose, pay attention to what Rick Lenchus said. A great teacher will teach you to look inward and find the best ways to be peaceful.
    The basics they should teach you are speed, control, and stregth. All of these come from learning to bring your strength from the Chi.
    The other thing that they should teach you is breathing.
    The bad thing is that most academies will wait until you have advanced enough to theach you the most basic knowlege. So, pay attention to what they teach to the advanced students and you will get an idea as to whether you are in the right place.
    Many academies I have visited are very crappy and worth nothing as martial arts. No matter what the style they practice, watch the shoulders of the instructors and advanced students. The shoulders should never hunch, tighten up, or raise. Focusing strength on the sghoulders, rather than the hips is probably the most common mistake in all practices.
    Kicks should be like whips, recoiling with as much power as they hit. Punches should never carry the shoulder, but come from the hip. Even boxers use their hips to support their punches.
    Another thing that a great instructor will require is that you practice stances. How you stand and how you switch from one stand to the next is the key to your fighting skill.

  5. sonnys profile image42
    sonnysposted 6 years ago

    I think a good pair of running shoes still works the best!

  6. wingedcentaur profile image84
    wingedcentaurposted 6 years ago

    I am no authority in this, of course, but assuming you live in a modern urban environment: Its probably best to study some kind of close-quarters fighting techniques. It would seem to me that techniques such as Krav Maga, and the like are best for modern urban life.

    For example: A young woman works late at the office and around ten o'clock at night or later, she goes down to the lower level of her company's carpark......

    Or she could be in a stuck elevator, alone, with someone who might attempt to victimize her....

    Or there might be a break-in of her house or apartment when she is there by herself...

    Here, we're talking about scenarios of attempted rape. But close-quarters techniques are most applicable to modern urban life, generally, I should think. Fighting is generally a sloppy, in-your-face, close contact affair, is it not? Obviously, the scenario does not play out like it does in most movies, with everybody nicely spaced out, where you can do all kinds of long, graceful, elegant punches and kicks, and so forth.

    Jaybird22's suggestion looks good also -- Combat Hapkido not for trophies or the UFC or anything like that.

    I could be wrong about this but a rapist or a mugger is like a predator in the jungle. He watches and waits and plans the best time and place to attack. Particularly in the case of a rapist, he likes to get his victim in a situation in which she cannot run away, which, I should think, involves boxing her in close quarters....

  7. profile image0
    Team Leaderposted 6 years ago

    Hello PhoenixV,

    I have been with the World Tang Soo Do Association for many years. I am training with two Masters. This year Master Carter, 6th Dan, will be honoured for his 30 years within the Association. Master Khan, 7th Dan, has been with the organisation for over 30 years. He is the European Director, is in the Hall of Fame and is world renowned for his ability and spirit. Both of them are truly inspirational. Their skill is just incredible. Have a look at the pictures of Master Khan on huntingdonstivestsd.com, he is awesome!

    Tang Soo Do is a Korean Martial Art. It is based on the philosophy of self-defense but I am telling you I have sparred with people who would be able to take you down permanently in an instant.

    One training sessions is two hours. We start with a warm up, stretch kicks, then all the kicks, punches, blocks and combinations. We then do the weapons, bong - long staff, knives, swords. After this we usually do our forms, then self defense techniques in pairs and free sparring.

    Since I have joined Great Britain Tang Soo Do (this is our region) I have become stronger, leaner and I have become a really good fighter. Mentally I have also grown a lot.

    What is also nice about our club is that we have a strict etiquette but at the same time we are very friendly amongst us students and we are familiy oriented, too.

    Ok, I better stop now. I do not want to clog up all your space.

    Your 'Team Leader'

 
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