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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (13 posts)

How long does it take to earn a black belt (shodan) in Kyokushin Karate?

  1. bernard.sinai profile image83
    bernard.sinaiposted 5 years ago

    How long does it take to earn a black belt (shodan) in Kyokushin Karate?

    I've been training Kyokushin Karate since 2007 and I'm still at 5th Kyu (senior yellow). How long is the average time training to be qualified for a 1st Dan black belt?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6935655_f260.jpg

  2. mothsong profile image79
    mothsongposted 5 years ago

    Hi

    I've just looked on a website for you and found this "Achieving a 1st dan black belt, or shodan, can take anywhere from four but often six to ten years of training."

    The site looks pretty interesting and can be found here: http://kyokushinwla.com/index.php?optio … d=27〈=en

    1. mothsong profile image79
      mothsongposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It takes about 3-4 years on average in Shotokan, but like endless sea said, it depends on how often you train and how often you grade (usually limited to 4 times a year in most styles, with longer periods between for more senior grades).

    2. bernard.sinai profile image83
      bernard.sinaiposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Osu!  Thanks for the link. It was very informative. :-)

  3. endless sea profile image71
    endless seaposted 5 years ago

    It depends on how fast you train and how often you give belt test, like when I was doing Tae-kuan-do I reached blue belt in 2 years after that I stopped giving test's but basically if you give it often and routinely you can earn black-belt 1 dan in 3-4 years expanding till as long as you want.

    1. bernard.sinai profile image83
      bernard.sinaiposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Osu! I guess it might take me longer because I train on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays for two hours.

    2. endless sea profile image71
      endless seaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah sure!! as I was regular student everyday for 3-4 hrs it took me 2years for blue belt-1..A ll the best with your martial arts

  4. TCaro profile image85
    TCaroposted 5 years ago

    The answer to that question depends on the individual ranking requirements of your instructor. One thing to understand about Kyokushin Karate is that it remains one of the most serious schools of traditional karate with a heavy emphasis on tough training. So, you won't see very many easily earned black belt rankings.

    1. bernard.sinai profile image83
      bernard.sinaiposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Osu! My Sensei sets very high standards for the students which is why we only have 4 black belts in the country with only one receiving Sandan and Sensei status. Thanks.

  5. NateB11 profile image93
    NateB11posted 5 years ago

    I don't know how it is done in Kyokushin specifically, but as stated earlier, it is one of the styles that emphasizes real training and doesn't just pass out black belts like some of the commercialized schools do. For a style that requires real work, it is a minimum of five years to get a black belt, and that is if you train consistently and know the material. In such a style it depends to a large extent on the student and how much time he or she puts into it. In any style, I can't imagine anyone getting 1st Dan without it taking at least five years; it takes at least that long to have a decent understanding of material and be able to perform it well; after that there is constant refining. I realize you say you've been at 5th Kyu after 5 years training, so it might be your instructor has certain requirements which he sees fit is necessary for someone to move on beyond that level. If I remember correctly, Kyokushin emphasizes fighting; some systems require some fighting to be done to get rank. Maybe he's looking at fighting in class, at tournaments, etc. I don't know. I think the important part is that a student enjoys the art, loves what he's doing and loves learning and the training, and gets better at it for him or herself. Edit: I just Googled it; yes, that's Oyama's style; that's a tough one; they're going to be having some tough requirements; Oyama was a tough guy. I think they also have the tough tournaments, some of the first to allow full contact. It came back to me.

    1. bernard.sinai profile image83
      bernard.sinaiposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks. I'm currently preparing to participate in our national games in full contact karate in November. I also have a grading coming up in September.

      Osu!

  6. KBEvolve profile image75
    KBEvolveposted 5 years ago

    That's not the right question, The time it will take it relative to the thought and effort you devote to developing the skill set.

    1. bernard.sinai profile image83
      bernard.sinaiposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Osu! Thanks for your comment.

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