How long do you need to be in a new country to feel at home?

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  1. emilynemchick profile image96
    emilynemchickposted 5 years ago

    How long do you need to be in a new country to feel at home?

    I always adapt very quickly - I can feel at home in as little as a week or two, but it takes much longer to get a really deep knowledge of a place.

  2. edhan profile image60
    edhanposted 5 years ago

    It depends on the area where you are living as some make you feel welcomed while others may not hostile. Anyway, my family and I are very adaptive in places we go to stay in different areas though I have not move to a new country. My young brother is now staying in New Zealand and settle in quickly.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It does depend on how welcome people make you feel - great point! Thanks for your comment.

  3. Family Fun Faith profile image60
    Family Fun Faithposted 5 years ago

    It seems to me that one of the key variables regarding to your question has to do with language. If you speak and read the language of a new place, assimilation should be much quicker than in a place where you do not know the language.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I absolutely agree. I didn't have that problem moving to America, but in the Czech Republic it took a while to feel comfortable speaking Czech (and I only ever had a basic grasp of the language). Still, Prague felt like my home. Thanks for commenting

  4. Billrrrr profile image81
    Billrrrrposted 5 years ago

    It took my grandparents about five seconds to feel at home in the United States after spending what seemed like an eternity in an overcrowded leaky boat, coming over from the old country.

    They spoke not a word of English, but learned it very quickly and made it a rule in their household that we could speak only English -  we were not allowed to speak the tongue of the old country.   Sounds perhaps like a harsh rule, but it made us real Americans in just one generation!

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's amazing Billrrrr! I can't imagine how difficult that must be, and I'm glad your grandparents found a good home in America.

  5. travmaj profile image80
    travmajposted 5 years ago

    Depends if the new country is to be long or short term.
    As a long time ex pat I still miss home. Perhaps because I left my immediate family behind. Admittedly, travel wasn't so easy in those days either. Today, many years later I'm still torn.
    Also much depends on language, finances, work, relationships, status - they often are a part of moving permanently to a new country.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you on all points - getting my visa and work permit in America helped me to feel more at home and independent. I still miss home sometimes too - leaving family behind is hard. Thanks for your answer.

  6. THINKINDIA profile image72
    THINKINDIAposted 5 years ago

    Purely depends on the country......nothing else

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That can be true. I've felt more at home in some countries than others. Thanks for your comment.

  7. marwan asmar profile image79
    marwan asmarposted 5 years ago

    I like to think I quickly adapt. I don't think it troubled me in the past to stay in other cultures and I'd like to think it won't trouble me now to be marooned in a place that I completely know nothing about. The potential thrill of the place is always exciting.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, marwan asmar. I always feel a thrill when I am in a new place, and that does help you to adapt. Thanks for your comment.

  8. Aussieteacher profile image78
    Aussieteacherposted 5 years ago

    It depends.  If you have to learn a new language and learn to comprehend a very different culture it can take months or year.s  Perhaps the learning never ends....

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's very wise, Aussieteacher. I think you are always learning new things when you live abroad. I also agree that some places do have very different cultures and it may be harder to adjust to living there. Thanks for your comment.

  9. shahbharti76 profile image61
    shahbharti76posted 5 years ago

    A person starts feeling at home in a new country only when he/she can start earning his/her bread and butter in that country.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is an excellent point and I truly agree. Part of why I felt at home so fast in Prague was that I began as a teacher almost immediately and I felt that I had a place there. Thanks for your comment!

  10. Globetrekkermel profile image75
    Globetrekkermelposted 5 years ago

    I have only lived in 2 countries but i have travelled quite a bit. I adjust easily to a place I go to, even with the language barrier.I love exploring places so I think If I move to onother country, it will be easy for me to adjust.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I love exploring too! It's easier to adjust if you have a love of new places.

  11. Abhaque Supanjang profile image80
    Abhaque Supanjangposted 5 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7996907_f260.jpg

    Usually around three months, Emily....! I need to observe more on everything in the new country where I live in -- especially the people who live around me, this is the first priority for me that I have to adapt before the other...!

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The people around you can make all the difference. I was lucky to be around great people in Iceland, the Czech Republic and America and that really helped out. Thanks for your comment.

  12. Ingenira profile image84
    Ingeniraposted 5 years ago

    Depends on the person's adaptability. For me, I need a year.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's true. It is certainly different for every person. Thanks for commenting.

  13. X-Con profile image77
    X-Conposted 5 years ago

    I would say, maybe about 2 years. I've been in Poland now for over 2 years (after my deportation from the US, which I lived in ever since I was 3 years old, for drug related charges, which I deal with in my hubs) and I'm starting to get the hang of it. The most difficult aspect of it all is the language barrier. But after overcoming that, it gets much easier. They say it takes about 2 years to learn how to speak a language conversationally and 5 years to speak it fluently.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The language barrier certainly makes a huge difference, I agree. Thanks for your comment.

  14. KawikaChann profile image83
    KawikaChannposted 5 years ago

    Wow, that's a good one... I think it depends on what you do in that country, and how you impact those that are around you and visa-versa.  When you have spent enough time in the trenches/offices/businesses etc to feel as if you have earned your keep in the presence of your peers, and when you have stopped saying you, you guys, you people, and have replaced it with, I, we, and us... I think that would be a good indication of feeling at home where ever you are.  Peace.  Kawi.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Very insightful comment, KawikaChaan. I still say 'you guys' to my husband when talking about America sometimes, but at other times I identify myself as a part of this country and city too.

  15. Kevin Peter profile image69
    Kevin Peterposted 5 years ago

    I depends upon the character of each person. Those who are friendly and bold will require only a few days to feel at home in a new country. But for those who are shy and quiet, it may take a lot of time. I.e, adaptability of a person has great importance in such cases.
    People who quickly adapt to a new atmosphere can be good friends too. We never feel bored when we are along with such people.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      True - some people are simply more adaptable. I'm very shy, though. I think I was just lucky to meet many other people who were not. Thanks for your comment.

  16. liesl5858 profile image88
    liesl5858posted 5 years ago

    Maybe a month or two but I always feel homesick, even here after 23 years in England I still miss my family in the Philippines especially my father, step-mother and brothers & families & sister. I can adapt easily to other places and people but I still miss my country home. As the saying goes "There is no place like Home".

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There is no place like home. Even though I feel at home in the US, I still miss my family and occasionally get homesick. I hope you get to visit plenty! Thanks for commenting.

  17. Onesimus profile image60
    Onesimusposted 5 years ago

    In my opinion, this has less to do with time spent abroad and more to do with your ability to grasp the language and etiquette's necessary to live and function on a day-to-day basis.

    Once these are grasped you can start to be more independent and make progress with the things that are important to you. 

    It also depends on your ability to cope with change.  I lived abroad for 3 years without returning home (in fact, as of the writing of this, I'm going to be returning back to the US for a while now).  Avoiding "complaining" and the other expats that complained about everything was absolutely essential to living abroad like that for me.

    1. emilynemchick profile image96
      emilynemchickposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Unfortunately many people love to complain about the place they are in because it is not the same as the one they left. It's great that you are able to avoid that. Thanks for your answer.

  18. profile image0
    Justsilvieposted 5 years ago

    when one has the ability to make a living, speak the language well enough to understand politics and a developed close circle of friends to share your life with. That pretty much makes you sigh and think "there is no place like home". But I don't think the feeling of homesickness for your native country ever goes totally away.

 
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