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How do you befriend a crow?

  1. Lee Tea profile image92
    Lee Teaposted 4 years ago

    How do you befriend a crow?

    They love the walnuts in my used this time of year...take them to the lightpost and drop them in front of passing cars to crack them open! So cool, and so amazingly intelligent.  Anything I can do to begin interacting with them? (my kids like getting them to respond to our crow calls)

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 4 years ago

    To befriend a crow it is easiest to start in the winter. Scavangers like crows will have less food then. when some are in tree near your house go out and quietly lay some food such as nuts ,seeds, eggs, wet dog food or corn out. Then return inside. after a while they will start to know that you bring them food. They will learn to trust you. Also they enjoy shiny things so leaving bits of tin foil or garland out might be nice for them. Be sure to leave ur gifts to the crows in the same spot. My crow knows my voice. so i can call him. If you would like this, before u leave food talk out loud for a few seconds then leave the food.

    1. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Nice to meet you on some common ground JT.  I heard popcorn's good too.  Like the idea of something shiny, same spot, and using voice - watched a show on how they recognize faces, maybe special hat/feathers? This'll be fun - I can hear them now! Thx!

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      You are very welcome Lee. You may even have them eating out of your hand. smile

    3. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      That'd be wild, but I don't go into this naively...I already have two parakeets that want next to nothing to do with me.  They were given to my kids as gifts...they've taught me I'm not really a bird person sad  or rather that birds belong outside!

    4. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      LOL smile

  3. CraftytotheCore profile image81
    CraftytotheCoreposted 4 years ago

    I used to have a pet crow when I was really young.  My grandfather rescued it when it was injured and kept it in a bird cage.  From what I'm told, it was very smart.  It learned to do tricks.  Then one day when it healed, they let it go and it flew away.

    1. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'm about to let my kids give the 'keets a ceremonial send-off. They'll think they're doing a beautiful thing, and I'll just let that be that lol...

    2. Borsia profile image43
      Borsiaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      When you say Keets are you talking about parakeets?
      Are they native to your area?
      I not then you are introducing a foreign and possibly invasive species. This is where we got starlings not a good, or legal, idea.

    3. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      *Do not release parakeets in the Pennsylvania woodlands* ... got it.

  4. aviannovice profile image89
    aviannoviceposted 4 years ago

    All the corvids, ravens, crows, magpies, jays, etc., are remarkably intelligent.  The raven is the most intelligent of them all.  The crows will likely bond with your children(if they are slower moving and quiet--as loud noises and rapid movement will frighten them).

    Give them things.  They like brightly colored, small items, and as you know, enjoy the nuts that they can crack and gain the nut themselves.  They will play with you, and hide pebbles, pieces of wood, and other things in PVC piping.

    Crows need and deserve their freedom.  Groups of juveniles(immatures that often hang together), will be as curious about you and your family as you are about them.  Provide water and food on a perch, and they will come together.  They may even bring others affiliated with their social group.  Once they know that you are not out to harm them or capture them, you will all begin to share the wonderful knowledge of what bonding with a bird truly means.

    1. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      **blinks twice, squints** you don't look like a novice... lol smile
      Thanks for the great info, I really appreciate it.  This'll be so fun to work on with my scientifically-minded daughters through the fall and winter!  We'll take pics and do a journal!

    2. aviannovice profile image89
      aviannoviceposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      How's the research coming?

    3. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Slow Deb, really slow lol smile
      Back when we were first discussing this I did try some foil and walnuts. I think one crow came up one time. But, they are everywhere now. Blue Jays too. We'll try again! But we do have an outdoor cat... and they know it.

  5. Borsia profile image43
    Borsiaposted 4 years ago

    Begin by setting up a feeding place where they can get food and water.
    Once they start coming start sitting quietly at a distance and just watching.
    Over time move closer until they are very close. Then start dropping the food only a few feet away. Finally placing it right at your feet and eventually handing it to them.
    I've done this with blue jays, tree squirrels, ravens and even with coyotes, although never attempting to hand it to them.
    Once they loose their fear of you they will become quite brave and friendly.
    *NOTE I do NOT recommend that you or your children attempt this with something like a coyote, badger or any other potentially dangerous animal.

    1. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      *Do not befriend badger* ... got it.  You're a regular Snow White...
      In our small city lot we have tons of chipmunk and squirrels, blue jays and a regular family of cardinals I feed from the feeder (well, until the squirrels chew it down..)

    2. Borsia profile image43
      Borsiaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Jays are unbelievably intelligent and can be befriended easier than most other birds. Its fun to set up obstacle courses for squirrels they are master puzzle solvers.

  6. bluesradio profile image75
    bluesradioposted 2 years ago

    Crows are like just about any creature, including us humans...Feed them and they will probably be your best friends for life......

    1. Lee Tea profile image92
      Lee Teaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Keep it simple... makes sense smile You know, I posted this a while ago and it's again that time of year when they're around for the walnuts. Nice timing calling our attention back to this thread - winter will be here soon...now's my chance!

  7. bluesradio profile image75
    bluesradioposted 2 years ago

    We see them all the time at the Hayti..... read more

 
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