I'm At The End of My Rope Due to My Neighbors Cats

Jump to Last Post 1-1 of 1 discussions (39 posts)
  1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
    RJ Schwartzposted 21 months ago

    I have a very inconsiderate neighbor who owns at least 5 cats, which run roughshod over my property.  They use my gardens and beds as a litter box and I wake up every day with at least one of two sleeping on my driveway or worse, on the hood of my truck.  I'm looking for ideas on how to "correct" this situation.  I do have a sprinkler system so anything that's powdered would likely wash away quickly.

    1. Randy Godwin profile image92
      Randy Godwinposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Borrow a cat hating dog for a few days. Or get a pig and allow it on their property for awhile. smile A few days of cleaning up pig sh*t should send a message complaining cannot.

      1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
        RJ Schwartzposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        That was the same thing my wife said Randy....the dog at least.  I think I'd find it difficult to have a hog in the area without a neighborhood panic occurring..ha ha ha

      2. Live to Learn profile image80
        Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        A pig? that's got to be coming from someone who has never owned a pig. The damage a pig does with its nose is ten times worse than cleaning up a little poop. One of ours got out and it looked as if someone had disced the yard. Thank god it didn't go off the property. That would have been thousands of dollars in landscaping costs to correct the problems created on other people's property.

        A dog is a great idea. Or, if you don't mind spending a little money there are products that send out ultrasonic waves to repel cats.

        1. Randy Godwin profile image92
          Randy Godwinposted 21 months agoin reply to this

          Just as wrong as usual! I'm a retired farmer, L2L. I know pigs cause lots of damage, but then, cats are a pain in the ass in other ways. Ever had a male cat intentionally seek out an open vehicle to spray the floor with his urine? Yes, a pig will get their attention quickly, and they'll surely make some sort of deal rather than having "your pet" on their premises. Sometimes people aren't considerate until they encounter those of a like mind.

          1. Live to Learn profile image80
            Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

            LOL. Have you ever been to court to see who is responsible for damage done to a lawn by loose livestock? Even if the pig is a pet I'd like to see how you think such a court case would go. On the one hand, a cat is pooping in the flower bed. On the other, the pig has rooted it up, entirely. Killing all the plants involved and then going on to ruining an entire lawn. Both owners seeking compensation.

            Yes, I agree some people are inconsiderate. If I had a neighbor with an attitude that a cat pooping and a pig rooting were comparable I'd hope I was the pig owner and he was the cat owner. The other way around would be a disaster waiting to happen.

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 21 months agoin reply to this

              Not for me.  I like bacon.

              1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
                RJ Schwartzposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                I agree - bacon beats just about anything

            2. Randy Godwin profile image92
              Randy Godwinposted 21 months agoin reply to this

              I did not suggest letting the pig completely ruin the landscape, simply allowing the pig to send a message to a reluctant neighbor. A small pig does minor damage especially if its not there long.  Anyway, I'm sure you've owned lots of pigs in your lifetime so I'll bow to your obviously superior swine knowledge.  tongue

              1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
                RJ Schwartzposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                What did you farm Randy?  I'm in the potato business myself - don't know much about livestock

                1. Randy Godwin profile image92
                  Randy Godwinposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                  We grew tobacco and peanuts for our main crops, Ralph. We also had around 60 head of cattle and 30 or 40 pigs we grew for the market and for eating. Both were free range in their own wooded and pasture areas. We still rent our farm out to my cousins and the pasture land as well.

                  Just can't beat homegrown meats and vegetables. Thinking about getting a few chickens for eggs and meat, and perhaps a few goats to clean up the underbrush as well. And barbecued goat is so fine...

                  Do you only grow potatoes?

                  1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
                    RJ Schwartzposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                    We do onions as well as spuds.  I do small plots of herbs - mainly lavender, comfrey, and melissa which we sell locally.to folks who make natural bath products and skin care concoctions.  And of course I have several vegetable gardens for canning and pickling.  Me & my boy are planning on starting some bee colonies this summer if we get the time - we know  local honey producer who said he'd help, but it seems like there are never enough hours in the day.

              2. Live to Learn profile image80
                Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                Actually, a small pig can do a lot. Whether you consider it damage or not, is a personal choice. We had a litter get out and attack my beds one day. what I ended up with was actually nice. They loosened the soil and did a lot of weeding in the process and separated a few plants. After putting everything back in the ground I had about 10 sedum plants where initially I had had three. I made the most of it and thanked the little buggers for their effort (just prior to warning my husband to ensure it never happened again. He didn't).

                1. Randy Godwin profile image92
                  Randy Godwinposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                  After hunting wild hogs one night, we killed a sow with a litter of six or eight small pigs. My friend raised one little female he named "Little Pig" who was really smart. While the dogs were lying around in the backyard, Little Pig would be in an old recliner under the carport. She'd also chase cars along with the other dogs. He eventually gave her away to a petting zoo she was so tame. They are smarter than a dog in many cases.

                  1. wilderness profile image94
                    wildernessposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                    There used to be a pig in our subdivision.  Saw it one day, chasing a dog down the street and though "What an ugly dog!" until it got closer.  Next thing the dog was chasing the pig.  They would go back and for for hours some days.

                    Pigs are noted for being one of the smarter animals.  Don't know they are up with dolphins or chimps, but they are high on the list.  (Higher, I think, than liberals are big_smile)

    2. Carolyn M Fields profile image92
      Carolyn M Fieldsposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Enough with the pigs . . . here is what I found online . . .

      If the homeowner allows the cat into your yard and the cat relieves himself on your plants, either killing the plants or causing such a stink that in interferes with your enjoyment of your property, you have a civil lawsuit. In theory, even if the cat causes no damage, you have a suit for trespass that would allow you to go to court seeking a restraining order (not against the cat since most of them can’t read), but against the owner.

      1. Live to Learn profile image80
        Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        It will honestly depend on where you live and local ordinances, to determine whether you have a valid complaint or not.  I know the small town I am from would not give you the time of day, in court.

      2. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 21 months agoin reply to this

        You can sue anyone for anything. What matters though is if you are able to win. To do this the OP would have to find a lawyer that is willing to take on this case. How easy do you think that is going to be?

    3. Carolyn M Fields profile image92
      Carolyn M Fieldsposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Have you considered wolf pee?

      You can get hanging vials if you are worried about your sprinklers.
      https://www.predatorpeestore.com/cat-repellent.html

      A ten-pack of easy-fill hanging vials to WEATHER PROOF the "pee." Attach dispensing vial to ground stake with included twist ties, place stake into the ground every 10-12 ft and fill the dispensers about half way with PredatorPee to create a "pee-rimeter." Each 10pk will create about a 120' perimeter.

      1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
        RJ Schwartzposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        I'm going to look into that - thanks Carolyn

      2. MizBejabbers profile image89
        MizBejabbersposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        Carolyn, would wolf pee repel or scare chickens? We've been trying to raise a flock of chickens and keep them in our greenhouse when they are small, but a possum and maybe rats have gotten most of them. We have one left from our first flock and she's now laying eggs. We bought six more, and despite plugging all holes, something got in and killed one small hen and took our little rooster. We now put them all in a dog kennel at night and will do so until we can get a fence and coop built.

    4. Melissa A Smith profile image98
      Melissa A Smithposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      It should be illegal to let cats out. People who do this are despicable.

      1. MizBejabbers profile image89
        MizBejabbersposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        My two cats are house cats. I don't let them out because most cats don't live very long outdoors. Where I live in a housing division in the county, we have speeding traffic and coyotes. Most of my neighbors who have cats let them roam, and I notice that the cat population changes out every four or five years here. They've never caused us any problems, and they keep the rat population down.

    5. MizBejabbers profile image89
      MizBejabbersposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Ralph, look on the bright side. Animal poop is great fertilizer. We are collecting the chicken litter and putting it on the rose bushes. Believe it or not, I learned that from a gardener at the State Capitol when I worked there. Every year they haul in chicken litter and put it on the rose beds. And yes, it stinks for about two weeks then the odor goes away. The roses are gorgeous.

      1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
        Melissa A Smithposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        Carnivore poop is NOT healthy for gardens and it contains dangerous bacteria. Cat poop in particular can have T.gondii.

        1. DrMark1961 profile image97
          DrMark1961posted 21 months agoin reply to this

          "Dangerous bacteria?"
          It does have to be composted, and is not as nearly as easy to use, or as useful, as chicken manure. It is not good fertilizer.

          I agree with your comment on this despicable behavior. If his neighbors cared about their cats they would keep them confined.

          1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
            Melissa A Smithposted 21 months agoin reply to this

            Huh, what do we disagree on?

            1. DrMark1961 profile image97
              DrMark1961posted 21 months agoin reply to this

              Not much. You are one of the few levelheaded people around. So many that write on the internet rant about "wild animals".
              I just was not sure about your comment about "dangerous bacteria".

              1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
                Melissa A Smithposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                It was my understanding that the bacteria from carnivores can cause illness easier than herbivore poop, which is why it needs to be composted (and this wouldn't be the case with someone's  cat pooping in your yard) and why composting it is more involved. I use my mara's poop without composting.

                1. DrMark1961 profile image97
                  DrMark1961posted 21 months agoin reply to this

                  The main concern that most people have with it is parasite eggs. If your dog or cat does not have parasites, there is nothing wrong with using it fresh.
                  I compost my dogs fecal material even though I am reasonably sure they do not have parasites. I mix it with wood shavings, grass trimmings, and old compost to provide a bacterial culture. I flip it to keep the whole pile hot, but it is really good only after about 6 months.

      2. Live to Learn profile image80
        Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        I've smelled chicken poop. Horrendous stuff. I always said if I were evil and hated a neighbor, I'd spread it on the property and immediately take a 2 week vacation.

        I'd rather have a neighbor with a few wandering cats than one who used chicken poop in excess.

        1. MizBejabbers profile image89
          MizBejabbersposted 21 months agoin reply to this

          Well, if you'd worked my position as a legal editor at the State Capitol, you'd have smelled it every spring or found another job. Apparently they have no pity on tourists and visitors. They plant the experimental roses from the state university experiment station. Each year they choose the best ones and market them. The Capitol keeps the best ones planted from year to year. I don't know if the litter is composted or not, but it smells bad for a couple of weeks.

          1. Randy Godwin profile image92
            Randy Godwinposted 21 months agoin reply to this

            The farmers around here use chicken manure to fertilize field crops such as cotton. Among the chicken manure are dead chickens who didn't make the cut. They spread this on the land before the crops are planted with the first heavy dew activating the aroma.  Needless to say, the buzzards have a field buffet day until the fert is harrowed in.  I suppose it's the smell of money to some....

          2. Live to Learn profile image80
            Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

            They use it where I live also. Could be worse. When I was at the Air Force academy they used (what we were told to be) composted human waste as fertilizer. It smelled horrendous and definitely kept me off the grass.

            1. RJ Schwartz profile image91
              RJ Schwartzposted 21 months agoin reply to this

              sometimes we'll get a potato storage which has gone south to the point we can't even sell it to a processor - the mess is scooped out and then dumped on the far edge of the desert - a few days of sun makes it unapproachable for miles

              1. Live to Learn profile image80
                Live to Learnposted 21 months agoin reply to this

                One of the many joys of desert life I may never get to experience. Darn.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://maven.io/company/pages/privacy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)