Taking a New Job... and then getting offered a better job

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  1. crankalicious profile image91
    crankaliciousposted 7 months ago

    I'm actually asking for somebody else, but I would love some feedback on this question.

    Let's say you have been out-of-work and you accept a new position, but that new position pays less than you were making and requires a commute that you didn't have before.

    Within a week of taking the job and starting, you are offered a better, more lucrative position with no commute.

    What would you do?

    I have been arguing with my friend that you have to do what's best for you because a company is not paying you for loyalty, they are paying you for your work product. And while some companies are very good to their employees, ultimately a company will act in its own best interest and an employee should too. If that means quitting within a week, then so be it.

    Let me know what you think. I'm very interested.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image91
      MizBejabbersposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      I have to agree that the worker should do what is best for himself and his family. He has no guarantee that the new job will last. I once had applied for a job that I wanted very badly. It  didn't have an opening but the owner promised to hire me the next time a position opened. A new company offered me a job that wasn't quite comparable, but I needed a paycheck. About a month into my new job, the position at the preferred company came through. Out of a feeling of loyalty, I turned it down with regrets. One month later the new company I was working for went belly up and I was out of a job. The position I really wanted was filled, and I gave myself a good swift kick in the pants. That seemed to start several years of career problems. The position that I turned down would have honed my budding skills in a solid career, and I don't think I would have had those problems.
      Tell him to take the position he thinks will benefit his career the most!

      1. crankalicious profile image91
        crankaliciousposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        I'm appreciative of your take on this.

        My friend is very loyal and committed and is feeling really conflicted. This new position is something she needs to do, but feels like there's something better coming along. I would feel conflicted to and would not want to quit on a company that gave me a chance when I needed one. At the same time, if you don't do what's best for you, you usually end up losing somehow.

        Do people believe that employees owe their companies loyalty in addition to good work?

    2. promisem profile image96
      promisemposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      As someone who has hired a lot of people, I say there is more to a job than the pay and commute. You need to consider your boss, co-workers, benefits and opportunity for growth in both positions.

      I worked for a horrible human being and made a great deal of money. It wasn't worth the pain. I also worked with some pretty bad co-workers. They caused even more pain.

      When I reached a high enough level in my career, I hired good people first and skills second. I never regretted it.

      Life is too short to chase after money and come up with excuses for the sacrifices necessary to get that money.

      Loyalty to a company should be equal to loyalty that a company gives.

      1. promisem profile image96
        promisemposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        Telling employees they owe you nothing is a great way to destroy any shred of loyalty, trust or mutual respect.

        Run away fast from any employer who talks that way. He or she has no integrity.

        1. Live to Learn profile image79
          Live to Learnposted 7 months agoin reply to this

          It is more of a matter of carrying enough about your employees to want them to pursue what is best for them.

          1. DrMark1961 profile image96
            DrMark1961posted 7 months agoin reply to this

            You sound like a great human being. I would prefer to be your employee, but would high tail it out of there if that other person were to offer me a job.

            1. Live to Learn profile image79
              Live to Learnposted 7 months agoin reply to this

              If the money and benefits were better, I'd advise you to. And shake your hand on the way out,

              1. gmwilliams profile image87
                gmwilliamsposted 7 months agoin reply to this

                Exactly, go when the money is.

      2. DrMark1961 profile image96
        DrMark1961posted 7 months agoin reply to this

        Life is too short to chase after loyalty to your employer. Find a job closer to your home and spend more time with your family.

    3. Live to Learn profile image79
      Live to Learnposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      As someone who has been an employer and employee, I will tell you I always told my employees they owed me nothing. Employers don't give two weeks notice if they ask you to leave, no notice required if leaving is fair.

      Take the better job.

    4. gmwilliams profile image87
      gmwilliamsposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      Hell, take the better job period.  No ifs, ands, nor buts.  TAKE THE BETTER JOB, MAN!

    5. haidzdhee profile image60
      haidzdheeposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      Always think of the things that will make you happy and will catch your interest. If you think, you like the new job though pay less, then go for it.. What matters most is an environment that will make you enjoy regardless of how small or big salary

  2. DrMark1961 profile image96
    DrMark1961posted 7 months ago

    As an employer, I would have to agree.
    Remind him that the last hired is the first fired. If things turn out rough for the company in a few months they are not going to be loyal and hold on to him no matter the costs. He will be out of there quick.
    Then again, if the other, better position is with a strong company like Enron...

    1. crankalicious profile image91
      crankaliciousposted 7 months agoin reply to this

      So you might be upset if a person who you just hired quit soon after being hired but you would understand?

      1. promisem profile image96
        promisemposted 7 months agoin reply to this

        No. I would be upset because a good hiring process by a good manager requires a lot of time and energy.

        If the hire left just because of money, I would be even more frustrated because anyone who chases after money without other considerations is making a bad decision.

        1. crankalicious profile image91
          crankaliciousposted 7 months agoin reply to this

          Promisem,

          I appreciate your input. There's no bad intent here. She is taking the job because this is the opportunity she has, but she's anticipating that she'll get some other offers and she feels really bad that she might be in a situation where another offer comes along and she is faced with the situation of quitting a job she just started. There's family circumstances to consider here. The commute makes her unable to take her kids to and from school. It adds hours to the day. She can't make dinner for her family.

          The question is: if you have an offer for a job that you want to take and do well at and accept with the intention of doing so, but something comes along that's significantly better in both salary, commuting; etc. is there an obligation by the employee to put the company's needs ahead of her own and decline the new position? Or should the employee act in his or her own self-interest assuming no bad intent whatsoever.

          1. profile image0
            threekeysposted 7 months agoin reply to this

            I think differently now.
            Weigh up what the cultures are like and if the promise is greater with this no commute position, take it.
            Employers are not loyal to their employees, in my experience. You need to take care of you. On that premise I would encourage to take this latter offer.
            Just double check everything is above board. I hope its just not one of those positions that sound too good to be true...

          2. promisem profile image96
            promisemposted 7 months agoin reply to this

            The employee should act in his or her interest. That said, I would give a respectful explanation about the decision to the employer and point out that family was an important factor. It may soften the blow.

            It's a good idea to avoid burning bridges. I have seen situations where an employee exited badly and had that bad behavior come back to haunt him.

            1. profile image0
              threekeysposted 7 months agoin reply to this

              That is a good piece of advice. Leave but soften the blow. You never know as tables could turn.

          3. DrMark1961 profile image96
            DrMark1961posted 7 months agoin reply to this

            Her kids are a lot more important than that job.

          4. MizBejabbers profile image91
            MizBejabbersposted 7 months agoin reply to this

            Crankalicious, I took my last (state government) job with the intention of leaving as soon as a better one came along. The pay was 20% less than I'd been making and the small staff was cranky. However, soon we had a big turnover, and the boss came to me and asked me to stay. He allowed me to use downtime to go back to college and earn two degrees despite the fact that I think he expected to lose me down the road. I loved the work, and he gave me every promotion that he could. I gave him 30 years because I was a happy camper. So we never know how things will turn out, do we?

 
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