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Is college a prerequisite for being a successful person?

  1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
    Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks ago

    I went to college, but failed. I went to ITT Tech, but failed. I'm asking a simple question: Is college a requirement for success in the modern world?

    1. wilderness profile image99
      wildernessposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      Define "success".  I went to college, and leveraged it into a 22 year job.  Hated the job, hated the location; moved across the country and became an electrician.  Earned nearly as much and was much happier.

      Define "success".

      1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        Success (Living independently and AWAY FROM ANY GROUP HOMES)!!!!! I'm stuck in Season 5 because of this. Because of my failure as a unintelligent autistic man, I'm stuck with a Season that started June 2009 and continues to this day, even and I speak.

        1. sallybea profile image100
          sallybeaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          You don't need college to be a success in life.  Perhaps it is time to start practicing some positive affirmations in your daily life.  If you believe you are stuck in failure and that you are unintelligent then you will be stuck in that thinking.  Success is not measured only by how much you earn.  I am sure you have a lot to contribute in life especially if you focus your energy on making the lives of others around you more pleasant. I believe you reap what you sow.

        2. Sherry Hewins profile image99
          Sherry Hewinsposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          I don't think you need college for those things. You need an income, enough to pay for your basic needs, and the skills to live on your own. Skills like dressing, feeding and cleaning up after yourself and making sure your bills get paid.

          You also need the ability to handle emergencies, like knowing who to call when something goes wrong. Not panicking and making things worse.

          If you don't have those things, and you want to live independently then you can apply yourself to trying to get them.

          We don't know everything about your situation and how your autism affects you. Some very intelligent people are not able to do all of these things for themselves. That does not mean they can't have a happy and meaningful life.

          1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
            Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            Deleted

            1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
              Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              Easy for you to say. My mom is my legal guardian. Because of her, I'm now stuck at permanent failure status.

              1. theraggededge profile image99
                theraggededgeposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                No, your mom is not the cause of your 'permanent failure status'. Only you are in charge of your success, your outlook on life and how you shape your future. You have a choice in every moment how to react or how to think or how to behave. Only you can do it for you.

                {{Hugs}}

                1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                  Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  I don't know how to do that. I'm not responsible for my actions anymore. Thank you for those kind words, though. I'll take those words into consideration.

                  1. sallybea profile image100
                    sallybeaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    We are all responsible for our actions.  I read on your profile that you say that you are the only man in your living place who has an iMac and can operate it correctly.  It does seem to me that you could offer to help teach others how to operate a computer correctly if there is anyone in your living place fortunate enough to own a computer!  This could be part of the mechanism which will eventually prove to those under whose authority you are currently living that you are capable of change.  Clearly, your Mother cares if she wants you to go to college.  Like every mother she wants you to achieve your full potential.   It might be that you have to go along it to gain your independence.  Your own attitude to college, to her and to others in authority might have to change in order for you to gain your independence.

                    1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                      Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      I already said it once, and I'll say it again. I'm not in control of my actions. I can't go to college ever again because I fear failure there. I'm a permanent failure. It doesn't matter how successful I become. Permanent means "for the rest of your life, you're a failure"

                  2. Sherry Hewins profile image99
                    Sherry Hewinsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Being able to handle those emotions is part of being able to live independently.

                2. Kylyssa profile image99
                  Kylyssaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Actually, you might be wrong. In the US a legal guardian can keep a functional adult with autism in a group home until that person overcomes incredible hurdles to get out. Those hurdles include earning enough money to pay for a doctor's evaluation and getting permission from the legal guardian to earn that money and to see that doctor. People in group homes here are generally not assisted in getting out of them.

                  Ivan, your mom will pass away eventually and your opportunity to get out of the group home will surely come then if it doesn't come sooner and you can't get her to change her mind about you. Work toward that day, towards having enough money to buy an evaluation from a doctor with no vested interested in keeping you in a home.

                  Meanwhile, try to convince your mother of your value as a human being, perhaps show her material about people she values who also failed college. It may be that I am wrong, but I am seeing her words in your assertion that you are a failure because you didn't finish college.

                  1. theraggededge profile image99
                    theraggededgeposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    I didn't mention getting out of a group home, Kylyssa. I wouldn't presume to talk about how the system works in the US because I don't know anything about it. Neither do I know that much about Erick's personal circumstances, or his mother's treatment of him. I'm talking about attitude - a good attitude will get someone a long way in life smile

                    1. Kylyssa profile image99
                      Kylyssaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      The op said his definition of not being a failure would be getting out of the group home. People in group homes have very little personal freedom. I can't imagine the super-human attitude change it would take to be happy and fulfilled locked away when you know you can make it as a free person.

              2. galleryofgrace profile image82
                galleryofgraceposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                A college degree does not make you a success in life. It does not even help you make a living. Go to any fast food restaurant or grocery store and you will see that  people have to eat and live. Your bagger or the person who flipped your burger is probably a college graduate. The college degree means nothing. It's just a piece of fancy paper that you had to pay for.

            2. Kylyssa profile image99
              Kylyssaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              It is pretty condescending to assume a person who got into college can't dress themselves or pay the bills. High-functioning autistic people usually can do all that stuff; it's things you take for granted we tend to have problems with. Those things usually involve deception or stress management. For instance, you might feel no stress from fellow students calling you a retard again and again, but one of us might feel upset on a deep level. Or you might be stressed by a job interview, but you could be flattering and produce the right kind of eye contact to get hired. We tend to suck horrendously at the types of body language and lying required in the business world.

              1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                Except that I failed in both college and behavioral management.

                1. Sherry Hewins profile image99
                  Sherry Hewinsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  And I never assumed that Ivan can't do those things, I only said those were things he needs to be able to do to reach his stated goal.

          2. wilderness profile image99
            wildernessposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            No one that can get 26 articles approved for HubPages is unintelligent.  Autistic, maybe, but not unintelligent. 

            As Sally said, success is not how much you earn and you don't need a college education to be successful.  You might consider some kind of apprenticeship program, though - a learning environment with hands on experience built into it.  Just a thought, but one that can give a great career.  A classroom environment is not a suitable learning experience for everyone.

            1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
              Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              I see that you read my profile. I only show featured hubs on my profile, to keep the readers interested. You answered my question. Unfortunately, my mom still wants me in college, and my sister's going to college in 2020. My entire family wants me in college, but I don't. Also, my entire family went to college and succeeded. To them, college is a prerequisite for me to succeed. For me, I'm getting bored after 3 years without college. I've got $12,000 in student debt. I'm a failure not only to myself, but every member of my family, my friends, and society.

              1. theraggededge profile image99
                theraggededgeposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                Erick, it's your life and you don't have to live with someone else's definition of success. Writers don't have to go to college. I didn't go to college until I was in my 30s, and that was just because I wanted an IT qualification in order to teach computers. That has no bearing on the work I do now. Many, many successful authors and writers never went to university. Many more successful businessmen had no more than a basic high school education. My own kids never went to school at all. There is a huge variety of paths that lead to success.

                Not only that, but success means different things to different people. Some measure success in terms of money or job status. Others measure success in terms of life satisfaction.

                1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                  Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Wait, am I hearing this correctly? Writers don't have to go to college?

                  1. theraggededge profile image99
                    theraggededgeposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Of course not. You are writing. You are not in college. I never studied writing - I am self-taught in that regard.

                    https://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lis … llege.html

                  2. Kylyssa profile image99
                    Kylyssaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Yes. Writers don't have to go to college. I didn't finish college, either. I couldn't afford to pay for it anymore. I took biochemistry and physics, anyway. I have a few pieces published in science and technology, but they are completely unrelated to the courses I took in college. The lion's share of (and the highest paying) of the writing I do is educational material on social issues topics, pet care, and crafts. I have zero formal education on those topics.

                  3. wilderness profile image99
                    wildernessposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Like Ragged and Kylyssa, my writing is self taught.  Yes, I went to college; and stayed as far away from the "fuzzy subjects" (as we called them) as possible.  Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics; that's what I studied, not English or Writing. 

                    And beyond that, only one of my hubs is about any subject from college; the rest is about what I learned outside any institution of learning.

                  4. psycheskinner profile image83
                    psycheskinnerposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Of course writers don't have to go to college.  For most fields the work is all that matters.  And many authors find ways to get to a publishable level without college.

                    If you are interested in writing professionally you might be interested in the forums at absolutewrite.com which cover many kinds of writing.

                    1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                      Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      Thanks. I'll go put it in the notes.

                    2. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                      Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      Problem. I can't write 18,000 words in one sitting. It's too much. Publishing a book requires decades of writing. 5-9 decades of writing in my case, and I neither have the skill nor the time to publish a book.

                  5. TessSchlesinger profile image94
                    TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Been published since I was 10 or 11 years old. Won my first nation wide writing competition when I was 18. Have been published on three continents (in print) since then. Nothing to do with college. I went very late in life.

            2. Kylyssa profile image99
              Kylyssaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              You missed the bit where he's in a group home. His mother would have to allow, approve of, and pay for any such vocational training if the group home allows and supports it.

              1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                He also forgot the part where I mentioned that my mom's my legal guardian.

      2. Jeremy Gill profile image97
        Jeremy Gillposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        I'm 24 and still living with my parents. And I honestly don't mind! After all, I'm working hard to get where I want to be.

        I still attend college, and I'm edging pretty close to graduation (I also work part-time). My issue wasn't grades, but rather interest: I switched majors a few times, and it really set me back. Nonetheless, I'm confident I'll be where I need to be within a few years, financially independent and happy.

        The point is that success is found in different ways and at different rates. Keep trying and you'll make it.

        1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
          Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          I asked for a mobile phone at a Wal-Mart, and my mom said, "you have to go to college to get a mobile phone." I cant believe that my mom still thinks I have to go to college. She's taught in the ancient ways, the warrior's way. I need my own destiny.

          1. psycheskinner profile image83
            psycheskinnerposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            The warrior's way would be to figure out some other way to get a cell phone for yourself.  Such as by opening up different ways of making the money for yourself.  That is not an overnight solution but a reasonable goal to work towards.  It would also include researching the cheapest cell phone that would meet your needs, for example a reconditioned older model phone with a very basic pre-paid plan.

            If you are close to graduation you might also consider that it would be easier to meet your mother's terms.  Look at how many credits remain and the most interesting way to complete them, and strategies to make yourself more interested in them.  For example by finding a highly interactive program were you work with other people and help each other.  And connecting the course to your goals will also make them more engaging, like to get a promotion of job change that would improve your life.

            1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
              Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              I said it twice before, and I'll say it again. I'm not going back to college for fear of failing. Even if I did go back, my reputation there is so negative that I would be shunned by my friends.

              1. Jeremy Gill profile image97
                Jeremy Gillposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                We're not saying you need to go to college (many people don't), but there are alternatives that may interest you. Change to a different college, perhaps a 2-year one, switch to an easier major, get a degree in general studies, etc.

                Like psyche said, you could also look for work that interests you and use that to fund your phone.

                1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                  Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  I dont need a phone. All I need is a computer that exceeds the requirements. I wanted a quad-core computer ever since quad-cores came out. Now, I have one, one that exceeds minimum requirements. 32 GB System Memory, a video card at least 16 times more powerful than my previous one, and it's the latest version, 2017.

                  1. psycheskinner profile image83
                    psycheskinnerposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Well you were asking your Mom for a phone.  So it was a reasonable assumption.

                    So perhaps you need to sit down and properly analyse what you need as the first step for deciding how to get it--looking not only at your needs now but your future goals and aspirations so you can work towards them in manageable steps.

                    The computer you have now seems to function adequately.  Do you need a better one, or just want it?

                    1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                      Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      Not right now, but maybe 10 years in the future, when my mac is old. If I save $10/week for 520 weeks, then I'll have $5,200.

              2. psycheskinner profile image83
                psycheskinnerposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                Your other option would be to begin a treatment plan for your fear of failure, because very few worthwhile vocations are free of failure, not just as a risk but as a certainty.  And if you are near to graduation you have already achieved most of the success you need, it would be a pity to let that go to waste.

                All of which is something you should be discussing with an appropriate counselor, face-to-face.

                1. theraggededge profile image99
                  theraggededgeposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  I agree. One can't go along refusing to participate in life because of fear of failure. Fear is debilitating and restricting. On the other hand, refusing to be cowed by it and rising to a challenge despite feeling fearful is life-affirming.  Courageousness in the face of fear is what makes people strong.

                  1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                    Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    I hate group homes. I've always hated them. I really hate group homes.

                  2. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                    Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    But I'm a Permanent failure, and I never get success anywhere.

                    1. sallybea profile image100
                      sallybeaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      If that is your thinking then that is exactly what will happen.  None of us gets everything put on a plate.  We only have to change our thinking pattern and do something about it.   I have never had the privilege of further education after school and I have never allowed myself to be deterred by that.

                    2. theraggededge profile image99
                      theraggededgeposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      The more you say it, the more true it becomes. Do you really want to be a miserable failure? Because it sounds like you enjoy repeating it as often as you can.

                      The thing is, Erick, no one likes a whiner. So go do it somewhere else.

      3. TessSchlesinger profile image94
        TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I am going to define success in the following way.
        1. You have to be sufficiently independent of other influences and powers to be able to make your own decisions for your own life.
        2. You have to have good enough friends to make you feel worthwhile and derive enjoyment from them.
        3. You have to do something that gives you joy. We find ourselves in the things we do, whether it is work or not.

        So, no, you do not need college for those things, depending on how your life comes together. In fact, I would say 80% of the degrees out there are rubbish degrees. If you do an engineering degree or any of the hard science degrees, you are likely to find a job with ease. It doesn't guarantee happiness, because you still won't have your independence. Bosses are not nice people. That is evidenced by the fact that, depending on the country, between 75% and 95% of workers hate their jobs.

        Small business people are the happiest. They have sufficient income to be able to live reasonably well, and they have the independence. Nobody is there to tell them what to do.

        However, 80% of businesses fail. They fail because people had insufficient income to get them off the ground, and, because big business takes 80% of the market. Isn't it curious? Big business (20%) takes 80% of the market, and that leaves 20% of the market for small business (80%).

        This situation is going to get much worse as AI (Artificial Intelligence) takes over. Within ten years, most of humanity will be out of work.

        We face very dark times ahead.

        For what is is worth, I am on the autistic spectrum, but other than that had everything in my favour. I had an IQ measured in the upper echelons, was considered (at one point) one of the most beautiful women in the world, was talented in numerous things (including writing), and was privately educated, and therefore had the right connections.

        I failed in absolutely everything I have ever done, plus had the kind of trolling, bullying, sexual harassment, etc. that virtually destroyed me. Autism on any level is horrendous. I have no answers. I am now 66, and it's only just beginning to make sense.

        What would I do in your position?

        Start a Go-fund-It page, explaining that you are a not-very-bright-autistic person, but that, nevertheless, you are a human being who longs to be financially independent. Ask for enough money to fund a coffee cart, and then go learn how to run it. Be careful, the number of yukky people who will try to take it is not limited. You need to know how to protect what you have.

        Coffee carts make a lot of money, are easy to run, and so long as you have a good spot, will earn you a good living and give you your independence. I might also add that, although there are a lot of really shitty people in the world, for the most part, people are willing to help others.

        Take advantage of that. We were not all born to 'succeed.' But we can learn the ropes and eventually settle.

        One more story.

        Imagine a jigsaw puzzle with the most amazing woman/man/dog/computer/whatever as the centre piece. Then remove one of the pieces in the top right had corner. Regardless of how wonderful that picture is, the fact that one little piece is missing, even though it's out of the way, it makes a difference. Everybody notices.

        As a human being, you have a part to play in our world. It may be small, but you play a part. You are important. Life is precious. Start a funding page. Fund a small easy to run business. And may the force be with you.

        1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
          Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          I am astonished at the very level of wisdom you have given me. Seriously, you are wise beyond your years. However, my mom is my legal guardian, so my battle hasn't even begun yet. If you want to read my articles, go ahead. Read my recent article on how to deal with failure. You be quite amazed.

          1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
            TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Thank you.

      4. profile image61
        Leena91posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        College is not important. But education is important. You can still survive with skills. But education is important for knowledge.

        1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
          Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          That's right. I have a high school diploma...and that's something that my mom can never take away.

          1. gmwilliams profile image87
            gmwilliamsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Sorry, a high school diploma does not cut it anymore, especially in the postmodern 21st century.  One needs AT LEAST a college degree in order to put one's foot in the door.   Even with a college degree,  jobs are difficult to find unless one has a STEM degree or a specialized degree.  In order for one to gain entrance to an entry level professional position, a graduate degree is preferred.   

            In the postmodern 21st century, a high school diploma is equivalent to an elementary school education, a college degree is the same as a high school education, and now having a graduate degree is equivalent to a college degree.  Welcome to the 21st century.   The future will belong to the highly educated i.e. those with a minimum of a college education but graduate degree is strongly preferred.  In addition to that, one must possess an in-demand specialty.   If one is brave, h/she can be enterprising & social media savvy to be highly successful.   It is a minute percentage of non-college educated people who are highly successful.  Most will work in dead end, low paying Mcjobs with no prospects of advancement.

            1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
              Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              You know what. You are banned from my forum. That's it. I can't argue with you anymore.

              1. poppyr profile image100
                poppyrposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                A lot of what gmwilliams is saying is true, although it is a little dark and gloomy. College degrees aren't worth as much as they were 20 years ago. There's no need to block him from a forum. You asked a question and he gave an answer.

            2. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
              Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              theraggededge!!! Ban him from the forum.

      5. promisem profile image89
        promisemposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Quality of character is the most important prerequisite of success.

      6. The Stages Of ME profile image69
        The Stages Of MEposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I would say life experience is essential to success in the modern world. Where college is not the only blueprint for success, it is one option. Military service is another and work force, yet another. The truth is, the more we interact and learn of our World, the better we will be to interact and meet some measure of success.

    2. theraggededge profile image99
      theraggededgeposted 5 weeks ago

      Hey, Erick, stop it. You'll catch another ban. There was no need to 'yell' like that. You asked the question and people are attempting to have a conversation. Delete those shouty posts and go and play a game to bring yourself down.

      1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        I'm sorry. I'm upset. I usually get upset once every 2 weeks.

    3. theraggededge profile image99
      theraggededgeposted 5 weeks ago

      This link may help put things into perspective. There are some great suggestions there but you don't have to do all of them. Just doing a few would set you off in the right direction.

      http://simplewriting.org/writing-skills … t-college/

      1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        Thank you, theraggededge.

    4. blueheron profile image95
      blueheronposted 5 weeks ago

      What exactly IS a successful person, anyway? All any of us really do is survive, pursue some of the things we enjoy, and have some nice meals and good times once in awhile.

      If we are very fortunate, we will have had enough true friends that, at the end of our lives, we will will be able to count them one one hand. We will be among the fortunate few if we are lucky in love, or if we are fortunate in having a couple of good kids.

      As for living in a group home, most of us live most of our lives under somebody's thumb, one way or another.

      Life is very, VERY tough, but it's also very, VERY good. Yours is the same.

      Do what you love, to the extent you can--realizing that all of us are limited in our ability to do that.

    5. Kylyssa profile image99
      Kylyssaposted 5 weeks ago

      Dear Ivan,

      Things are not hopeless and you can be a great success with hard, hard work and careful planning. Use your computer to research your situation and find your way out. Don't think of such research as time wasted but as research for a novel as well. You could write about your journey to freedom at the same time, maybe even create a way out for others like yourself, high-functioning people kept in homes by family with standards far higher than the laws as to what makes them good enough.

    6. Joahn Moriens profile image60
      Joahn Moriensposted 5 weeks ago

      I dont think college is only way to success. I am student , but it does not mean that i am going to  be successful. We should do everything for that.work hard. no matter you learn at university or  no. we are students, live with parents and they think we cant decide anything for our own. but actually we should make them see that we are old enough already to take care, can take responsibilities and others. the only thing you should do ( in my opinion ) is not to give up. show more.  its hard to be in age like us, i know. its even harder here, in my country, believe me. Don t give up , and don t anyone tell you you are a failure or something like that. Just remember You are not, nobody is perfect but everybody can be Someone.

      1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        Your English might be a little hard to understand, but I still understood it well enough to tell you that your right. College isn't the only way. So what if my mom doesn't want me to succeed outside college? So what If I'm a Level 2 Permanent Failure just by the way the group home takes orders from my mom? So what if I'm only allowed to use my only prepaid card for games and nothing else. So what if my Permanent Failure level changes to 100 or 1,000. I'm still valuable.

    7. profile image61
      Nishi poddarposted 4 weeks ago

      I am a college student in first year and I don’t think that I am doing any good in college. I have learnt so much in school that now I think that I should have dropped studies because even when I am in one of the very renowned colleges, I am not happy and I don’t think I will be successful after this. In fact when I was in school, studying was my passion and now I don’t study even 15 minutes a day. College life is taking away all my interests and this will surely not make me successful.

      1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        OK, are you trying to copy me? You're not a failure. Neither am I. Stop worrying about yourself.

        1. patchofearth profile image90
          patchofearthposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          I've been reading down this thread and have a couple of thoughts.
          1. Just read your profile. It looks pretty good.
          2. Is it possible your mom is also on the spectrum? It looks different in women than it does in men. Also, an article I read recently said that autism is an 82% heritable trait which means if you have it, there is a good chance you inherited it from one of your parents. It also means any of your siblings could also have it.
          3. Do you have a way to earn money? It sounds like what you need more than anything right now is an income. I currently work from home as a content writer. If you can write a decent Hub, you can get paid to write content. All you need is a computer and internet connection. I have time tomorrow. I will sit down and write a Hub about it although I'd be willing to bet there are other people on here who have already written on the subject. Anyway, you don't need anybody's permission to earn money and money will give you options.
          4. Your use of the word failure makes me think it is something someone said to you and you believed them. So glad you have finally declared yourself not a failure.
          Best Wishes

          1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
            Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Sorry, but no dice. My Parents are normal. In Fact, there's no family history of autism. In fact, there's no genetic history of autism anywhere in my family.

    8. gmwilliams profile image87
      gmwilliamsposted 4 weeks ago

      In today's postmodern age, one must have at the minimum a college education to be successful.  Sorry but that is REALITY unless one is highly enterprising or talented or a combination therein.  The average person w/o a college degree will be consigned to minimum wage, dead end Mcjobs w/no chance of advancement.   In order to be HIGHLY successful, one must have at least a Master's Degree, preferably a Doctorate Degree.  Also one must have a specialty. The only people w/o college who succeed besides those who are enterprising or talented, are those w/connections through wealthy parents.

      1. Sherry Hewins profile image99
        Sherry Hewinsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I think your definition of success is a bit different from Ivan Hernandez's.

      2. theraggededge profile image99
        theraggededgeposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Total rubbish.

      3. TessSchlesinger profile image94
        TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        I agree. Most people have no idea just how much of a role the wealth of one's parents plays. Forty or fifty years ago, at the height of socialism/progressivism, things were different, but now it's a dog eat dog society.

        1. gmwilliams profile image87
          gmwilliamsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          Wealth is the springboard to success.  That is reality in the postmodern, 21st century.  As I have stated in my forums regarding the subject, children who are upper middle & upper class are the ones who will be highly successful because their parents can afford to supply them with myriad cultural, educational, intellectual, & socioeconomic opportunities.  Even the solidly middle class( which I came from & STILL AM) won't be able to provide their children with myriad cultural, educational, intellectual, & socioeconomic opportunities like my parents did for me in the 1970s.   Children born in the solidly middle class( middle level of the middle class) will have a more difficult time attaining educational & socioeconomic success.

          Children born into the lower socioeconomic echelons( lower middle, working, & lower classes) will have a scant or no chance of attaining educational & socioeconomic success.  Tess, I have stated this ad infinitum & have received arguments on the subject.   If one reads & observes the socioeconomic climate, it is the upper middle & upper class children who will be highly successful as their parents' wealth provided them with superior educational opportunities which enables them to succeed.

          1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
            Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            theraggededge! Do something.

          2. TessSchlesinger profile image94
            TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Yea, I know. From past posts and hubs on the topic, we both appear to agree on that. So does the research.

            Indoctrination makes people believe that anyone can achieve anything. Not true.

            1. gmwilliams profile image87
              gmwilliamsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              Exactly, in the future, there will only be two classes- the wealthy and the poor.  The middle class as we know it is being phased out by automation & downsizing.  Jobs that use to be the province of the solidly middle class are being downsized while jobs belonging to the lower middle class are being phased out & automated.  The solidly middle class is middling while the lower middle class is slipping into the lower class.  The upper middle class by their virtue of being highly educated( graduate & other specialized education, not to mention highly skilled) be remain the same with some becoming upper class. The 21st century is becoming the brave new world of sorts.

              1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                I agree. Now theraggededge, please tell gmwilliams that college is not a perequisite. PLEASE!!!

                1. theraggededge profile image99
                  theraggededgeposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  It isn't. You can be successful without a college education... if you are prepared to work for what you want. And there's no reason you can't go to college at any time in your life. It's up to you. Forge your own path.

                  1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                    Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Thank you! gmwilliams is talking nonsense. he thinks that AI is going to replace lower wealth jobs. AI may have an advantage over us, but they will never have a human heart. that's what makes AI different from us. They can't feel what we're feeling.

                    1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
                      TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                      Artificial intelligence will replace our jobs. Obama thinks so. Bill Gates thinks so. All the top scientists, technologists, businesses, etc. think so. Numerous businesses in the past few years have already replaced people with robots. You are on a computer. Why don't you google that?

                      So you bit your mother and she put you in a home. And sometimes you're violent.

                      My daughter loves children, but after two years of teaching autistic children behaviour modification, she left. It put her off teaching for life. She used to come home with large bruises, bites, etc. from being bitten, kicked, slapped, etc. by autistic children. Some of her injuries were really bad. But the point is that autistic children did, eventually, learn not to bite, not to spit, not to kick, not to hit, etc.

                      Maybe your mother put you in a home because she can't cope anymore, and at a certain level of stress, one just can't cope anymore. Love has nothing to do with it. Just because she loves you doesn't mean she has to put up with you biting her. Sorry.

                      One quarter of Americans are out of full time work. That ties in with the UK (United Kingdom) which also has a quarter of its people without work. This is the result of technology and computers replacing people. For instance, when I was young, there would be up to a hundred switchboard operators operating phones. Now that job doesn't exist anymore. Secretaries are very scarce. Many jobs have disappeared since I was a child. Many trades have disappeared. Half a century ago in the USA, you could just walk into a job. That does not happen anymore. It is very, very difficult for people, even with university degrees to find good jobs.

                      The only people who are absolutely guaranteed good jobs are those with very rare skills with doctorates in them, e.g. computer engineering (to work in robotics and artificial intelligence), genetics (gene manipulation), etc. I wrote a hub somewhere on the five jobs that will be 'easy to find' in the next ten years. But they all require extensive education.

                      So while you might not want to hear it, in your current situation, absolutely, no, you have no possibilitiy whatsoever of 'being successful' without a meaningful, very difficult degree.

                      Here's the reality. You are autistic. You bite, and you lose control sometimes. You don't have a college degree in a meaningful discipline that is desired by business/academia. You fail whatever courses you do.. Your parents don't have buckets of money.  They are going to die at some point. You are going to be alone without an ability to support yourself because you don't have a college degree or any other skill. Aside from that, business is not willing to hire austistic people. So if they do, it's because the autistic person has better skills than ordinary people - not fewer.

                      So, um, no you don't stand any chance whatsoever of being successful. Kick. Scream. Bite. That is the reality.

                      And if you want to get out of the home, you will no longer ook to your parents, but to your own capacity to control your behavour and discipline yourself.

                      Why did you fail college? Nobody is asking that. Because you didn't have the capacity? Because you didn't want to do it.

                      You say it will take you ten years to write a book. It takes me a month to write a book. It takes a ghostwriter 200 hours to write a book. it doesn't take anyone ten years to write a book. When an author says it will take them ten years to write a book, they mean they were out partying, drinking, working their day job, dating, etc. rather than writing their book. It doesn't take ten years to write a book. It takes 200 hours, i.e. five weeks if working at it full time.

                      I've written many books. I know that. But that's also the professional standard.

                      So you either learn a skill (electrician, scientist, writer, etc. ) and learn to behave in civilized society by not biting, or you stay where you are.

                      It's not about failure. It's about having the capacity to do something. And if you don't have the capacity, then you will need to be in care.

      4. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        College is NOT the only definition of success. I can't go to college for fear of failure. Why do I keep saying this? Writing on HubPages is the definition of success.

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
          TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          While 'success' is achievable without college, it requires money, talent, resources, etc. to do so. Education is a resource. The more you have it, the more 'successful' you will be.

          Studies/Research show that there is a strong correlation between success/education and the degree of wealth of one's parents.

          Basically, the children of the upper middle classes (Bill Gates was upper middle class) and the rich are successful (in terms of the traditional meaning of wealth). Poor people virtually never achieve success unless they have some sort of tremendous innate talent (stunning looks, great musical talent, etc.)

          I did read of a 'mighty Christian' who became a mega rich real estate owner. What he forgot to tell in the tale was that he started dealing drugs at a very young age and became mega rich through the drug dealing, whereupon he switcched to property.

          1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
            Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            Neither my mom nor my dad are super rich. In fact, my dad is poorer than my mom. My mom makes about $40.00 an hour. The problem is that she spends so much money on clothes and other stuff. Sometimes, she makes 30 or 60 dollars in one massage section. My mom's got her own problems to worry about. She doesn't have a lot of money, and if she does, she'll spend it on whatever she wants. Sometimes, though, she gives me the money.

            1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
              TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              I am curious why you think your mother can't be autistic.

              1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                For the last time, she's not autistic. She never expected an autistic child. She did teach Kindergarten when she was younger. She had to learn how to manage an autistic child. She loved me so much that on March 14, 2011, she created a song for me as my 18th birthday present. what I don't understand is why would she betray me by destroying my freedom? maybe it's because I've been labeled incapable of behaving perfect, showing that I can live independently, and incapable of everything except waste my time playing games on my computer.

                1. sallybea profile image100
                  sallybeaposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  She did it because she loves you.  You gave her no choice.  I am sure it was a decision made in your best interests.
                  It is up to you now to prove to her and the authorities that you are capable of better behavior.  None of us is perfect but if my freedom depended on my improving my behavior I know what I would do.

                2. Marisa Wright profile image97
                  Marisa Wrightposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                  It sounds as though she "deprived you of your freedom" because she was afraid of what would happen if she didn't.  You said yourself, you bit her, and you have been violent to other people.  I think she was afraid you would hurt someone really badly, and then you might be sent to a real prison, where you'd be treated like a criminal and not a king.  She wasn't able to protect you, so she had to find a place that would protect you.

                  If you want to get out of the group home, you need to prove to her that you are not violent any more. Then she will stop being fearful of what you might do.   It sounds to me as though you have more work to do, to get your behavior under control.

                  Have you thought about doing college study online?  Then you don't have to deal with other students, you can do it privately, and the only person who knows whether you do well or badly is your tutor.

                  1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
                    Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Impossible. I can't do it for fear of failure.

                    1. Marisa Wright profile image97
                      Marisa Wrightposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

                      That's OK.  College is not essential.  You can be a successful writer without college.  Besides, I think you should be focussing on learning to control your behavior first, because that sounds like your biggest challenge.

            2. sallybea profile image100
              sallybeaposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              Parenting is possibly one of the most difficult things a person gets to do in life. It is something we are not trained for and most of us do the best we can. I find it upsetting to see your Mums private life being exposed on the internet.  I think that one should always guard our own and our families reputation.  Any future employer, if they have any sense, would always look to see what they can find out about any future applicant.  What we say on the internet cannot be easily undone.

          2. gmwilliams profile image87
            gmwilliamsposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            +1,000,000,000,000,000.   From the late 20th century on, for young people to be highly successful, they must at least have at the minimum a college degree although a graduate degree is preferred, particularly for entry level professional jobs.  In addition to that, young people must be at least from solidly middle class homes where there are myriad educational and socioeconomic opportunities.  It is extremely rare for young people from lower middle, working, & poor to be highly successful.  Such young people are doomed to repeat the socioeconomic cycle of their parents & grandparents. 

            In some cases, young people from the lower socioeconomic echelons(lower middle, working, & lower classes) will even become poorer as a result of their jobs becoming outmoded & automated.   The only way for young people from the lower socioeconomic echelons to be highly successful is by "luck" & possessing prodigious talents, beyond stunning looks, & other outstanding attributes. Otherwise, they are stuck in their particular socioeconomic strata.  As I have stated in my previous forums, the future belongs to the upper middle & upper classes, even the solidly middle class will have a difficult time in the future.

            1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
              Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

              Stop it. Are you saying that I'll be Upgrading my Permanent Failure status to Omega Status? There are three kinds of "Permanent" Permanent Failure Classes. Alpha, Beta and Omega. Omega is by far the worst.

        2. sallybea profile image100
          sallybeaposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          In reality, your first step to freedom would be to go along with the idea of college as you could then leave the secure home.  The fear of failure is not the same as 'failure'.  Facing that fear is the first step to freedom.  Fortunately, we all have to do things one day at a time in small steps so we have time in our hands.

    9. threekeys profile image84
      threekeysposted 4 weeks ago

      Tess, this explains everything.
      What a inspiring and empowering response you have given. How very kind, practical and supportive. WE need more of this in our daily lives. Ivan couldn't be helped more!

      1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
        TessSchlesingerposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Thank you.

    10. ryanpugs profile image60
      ryanpugsposted 4 weeks ago

      You've got these things available to you:

      1). An iMac
      2). An internet connection
      3). Lots of spare time

      With those three ingredients there are plenty of skills you could learn which you could subsequently trade for money.

      With that money you purchase whatever it is that you deem necessary to consider yourself 'successful'. I'd suggest that being able to go to Walmart yourself and purchase your own phone would be one of those.

      Is there any reason why you couldn't learn a programming language? There are numerous sites which help you to learn how to code for free. I mean really.... a college can't teach you how to code. Half of silicon valley is probably on the autism spectrum.

      That's one example. I think college should be seen as a necessary means to gain entry into a career that you have already decided that you want to do, not something that you do for status just so you can say "I passed college", it doesn't make you employable.

      You've already ascertained that you need a means of making money, now you need to think of the various means available to you and then determine what steps you need to take. College may not be necessary.

      There is a 33 year old man in my hometown who started a business in 2011 with a few thousand dollars, that business is now worth about $500 million, employs 400 people and has offices in 4 continents. He didn't go to college.

      The main ingredient is determination. You have to really want it, and I don't think your mum buying you gadgets on demand is going to help you find some of that - her stance is correct.

      1. poppyr profile image100
        poppyrposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        ^ This is fantastic. Many people wish they had more spare time to pursue their dreams. I know I'd write more books if I didn't have to work full time. As ryanpugs said, you have time and a computer, which opens a whole world of possibilities.

    11. Chriswillman90 profile image98
      Chriswillman90posted 4 weeks ago

      You have a lot of potential Erick, I enjoyed reading your hurricane/climate change articles.

      I hope you can continue to write more soon.

      1. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Thank you. I will write more articles soon

      2. Ivan Hernandez profile image90
        Ivan Hernandezposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

        Did you happen to read my Autism articles or my "how to conquer the fear of failure" article by any chance?

     
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