Today I Am Ashamed To Be Scottish

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  1. jimmythejock profile image87
    jimmythejockposted 9 years ago

    The Scottish Government today freed the lockerbie bomber,Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi on compasionate grounds because he has cancer and only a few months to live.

    As part of the statement made by The Scottish minister for justice it was said that the people of Scotland supported the decision.
    This is totaly untrue everyone I know including Myself are totaly against this decision this man showed no compassion for the victims in the air or in the town of Lockerbie why should we show compassion for him?

    The victims and the families of the victims have been totally let down by the Scottish Government and this is the first time in my life that I have ever said that I am ashamed of my country.......JIMMY

    1. tantrum profile image60
      tantrumposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      1-he's going 2 dye anyway... are't u happy?
      2-who do you think is paying for him ? You of course ,among all the scottish people.! So Won't you prefer stop paying and leave him to dye all by himself ?

      1. profile image0
        ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        A more suitable alternative would be to chop his head off. That way the Scottish/British would save their money, and that evil bastard would not get a single second of undeserved freedom.

        Im not an advocate of the death penalty.... I think that people should suffer for as long as possible. But if the decision was to let him die in prison, or let him die having a jolly up with his family (how many people lost members of their families?) then Im sorry but letting him die in prison is the only option.

        Were not talking about Ronnie Biggs the train robber that comically escaped to live the high life in Brazil, were talking about somebody that killed hundreds of people.

      2. relache profile image85
        relacheposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        Really?  What color?

        1. Ultimate Hubber profile image63
          Ultimate Hubberposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          lol lol

          1. tantrum profile image60
            tantrumposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              lol yeah ! I was in a hurry ! lol not the only mistake I made lol

  2. profile image0
    ryankettposted 9 years ago

    He should have died in prison Jimmy, most definitely. Compassion is not compulsory, I can't see why anybody should have compassion for him.

    100 years ago they would have chopped off his head, 'compassion' wouldn't have come into it.

    1. Kadmiels profile image56
      Kadmielsposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      agreed off with his head the yokel

  3. Mark Knowles profile image60
    Mark Knowlesposted 9 years ago

    Look at it this way - at least they held on to him long enough to make sure it was untreatable. wink

    1. frogdropping profile image83
      frogdroppingposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      That is a good point Mark. It's not the same as the man serving his sentence but ...

  4. Zsuzsy Bee profile image86
    Zsuzsy Beeposted 9 years ago

    Jimmy that sucks...People like that scum do not deserve any more compassion then they showed themselves in their lives. I say they should let him rot somewhere with out any medication. I know I sound callous but...

    zs

  5. frogdropping profile image83
    frogdroppingposted 9 years ago

    I'm genuinely sorry to hear this Jimmy. I remember the horror that befell Lockerbie with clarity.

    That man chose to take lives, he chose his path.

    And I know someone may happen along and you remind you, or I, that his punishment was his loss of freedom (which it was) but that does not justify releasing him because he's ill.

    I'm assuming he's terminal?

    Even so, I know the prison system well-ish and they're more than capable of treating his illness - without setting him free. He chose his path. End of story. In the same way that his choice became end of story for those he helped murder and their families who continue to suffer.

  6. Ultimate Hubber profile image63
    Ultimate Hubberposted 9 years ago

    Did the government even bother to get permission from families of the victims before releasing him? I am sure they didn't.

    1. profile image0
      ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      They claim that the families were "divided", but I bet that divide was nowhere near the middle!

      1. Ultimate Hubber profile image63
        Ultimate Hubberposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        As long as a single family is not willing on his release the government can't do that. I wonder what was the need to such a thing. Think there was a hidden pressure or something.

        1. profile image0
          ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          Well they did do it! They can do what they want, but I suspect that it has something to do with a backhander or favour - they always do.

          For all we know Liberia might be letting some British diplomat off of a speeding ticket big_smile

          1. Ultimate Hubber profile image63
            Ultimate Hubberposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            Now it make some sense. You can forgive the government for this now.

            1. profile image0
              ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              It was supposed to be humorous.

              Governments trade prisoners behind closed doors all the time. If you were to be arrested in Thailand for possession of a small amount cannabis and sentenced to 10 years in a rat infested jail.... you would be hoping that the American Embassy could help you out. Thailand will let you go 9 times out of 10, but why bother to put you there in the first place? They call in the favours.... thats how politics (unfortunately) works.

              There will be British prisoners in Liberia that are serving stupid sentences for mild crimes, such as defacing a picture of Gabbadi or something petty. If (and I am not suggesting that there is) there is pressure from Liberia for his release, (and you should note that many people in Liberia believe that he is innocent) then Scotland would without a doubt have negotiated a compromise situation. Expect Scottish cocaine dealers to be on the next plane to Britain.

              That was my point about the speeding tickets.

              1. Ultimate Hubber profile image63
                Ultimate Hubberposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                I was trying to find a reason why would a government make such infamous decision. This decision would take a lot of votes away from them. So this trade of prisoners sounded a good reason to me.

                1. profile image0
                  ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                  Fair enough! does happen a lot though.... obviously not for speeding tickets.... but expect a few North Koreans heading home after Bill Clinton's visit too! They say that nothing is free, and that is certainly true!

          2. Silver Rose profile image67
            Silver Roseposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            What's Liberia got to do with it? The prisoner concerned was Libyan.

            Libya: country on the mediterranean coast of Africa with a ton of oil and who has recently come "out from the cold" with lots of contracts with western oil companies to develop that oil (including Shell and BP of the UK). Libya also paid $1.8 bn in settlement for the families of the Lockerbie terrorist attack.

            Liberia: country on the western Atlantic coast of Africa, founded by the USA (they dumped a lot of slaves there), hence their flag looks a little American. Very unstable country - they had a civil war in 2001, and it spilled over into neighbouring Sierra Leone and Cote D'Ivoire, who called for help to remove Liberian forces. The UK sent troops to Sierra Leone (it's a commonwealth country), and the French sent troops to Cote D'Ivoire (it's a former French colony) - both succeeded in stabalising Sierra Leone and Cote D'Ivoire and kicking out the Liberian troops. No-one has bothered to stabalise Liberia though - I guess it is a US responsibility as former US colony, but they have no oil, only mangrove swamps, so are ignored.

            1. profile image0
              ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              Ooops, my bad....

              1. Silver Rose profile image67
                Silver Roseposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                Hey, easy mistake to make. Two dodgy African countries both beginning with Lib...  It's a bit like the way Bush used to confuse Iran and Iraq. Not that I would dream of comparing you to Bush of course! :-)

                1. profile image48
                  badcompany99posted 9 years agoin reply to this

                  Maybe thats why Ryan has his head turned, hes Bush smile

                  1. profile image0
                    ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                    Its also the reason that I have written a hubs about 'the most powerful nuclear nations' and 'the best hotels in afghanisatan'...

                    I've been rumbled wink

                2. profile image0
                  ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

                  I can see a few comparisons between Iran and Iraq, both 4 letter words beginning with 'Ira', and both places that westerners really shouldnt be thinking of going, the major difference between the two being that 'Iraq' is worth more points on a scrabble board big_smile

  7. profile image0
    Nelle Hoxieposted 9 years ago

    Thank you for the sentiment Jimmy. When I read that, I didn't in any way believe that the people of Scotland were responsible for it. I was surprised at the decision, but many things surprise me these days.

  8. Lisa HW profile image65
    Lisa HWposted 9 years ago

    Is there any chance he's really just too inconvenient to deal with at this point in his illness, and people are calling it "compassionate" because it sounds better?

    1. profile image0
      ryankettposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      Could be true. I suppose it may be a choice between paying lots of money for his treatment, or letting him go.

      In order to beat the so called 'human rights' lawyers, they would have to treat him... chemo and the works probably....

      Maybe sending him somewhere where he wont get treatment is in fact a better punishment in some respects....

  9. profile image48
    badcompany99posted 9 years ago

    Could be worse Jimmy you could live in Northern Ireland where the British Government released I.R.A murderers and made them our Government Ministers !

  10. profile image0
    Crazdwriterposted 9 years ago

    I am really sorry to hear about that Jimmy. I doubt he'll get a chance to live much longer. I wouldn't be surpirsed if the families of the victims took things into their own hands if you know what I mean.

    1. Mark Knowles profile image60
      Mark Knowlesposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      He is on a private plane to Libya, so I doubt it. wink

      1. profile image0
        Crazdwriterposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        aaa damn...well then maybe the pilot? somebody?

  11. profile image0
    ralwusposted 9 years ago

    Jimmy, don't be ashamed. It is all politics and oil methinks. Not surprising really.

  12. Plants and Oils profile image86
    Plants and Oilsposted 9 years ago

    I think it's probably the right thing to do.

  13. Dame Scribe profile image60
    Dame Scribeposted 9 years ago

    I support your thoughts Jimmythejock sad cancer leaves no room for a pleasant or easy death. He may not get to leave this world resting happily. hmm

  14. Plants and Oils profile image86
    Plants and Oilsposted 9 years ago

    The Rev Ian Galloway from the Church of Scotland said this, today:

    "We are defined as a nation by how we treat those who have chosen to hurt us. Do we choose mercy even when they did not chose mercy?

    "This was not about whether one man was guilty or innocent. Nor is it about whether he had a right to mercy but whether we as a nation, despite the continuing pain of many, are willing to be merciful.

    "I understand the deep anger and grief that still grips the souls of the victims' families and I respect their views, but to them, I would say justice is not lost in acting in mercy.

    Instead our deepest humanity is expressed for the better. To choose mercy is the tough choice and today our nation met that challenge."

 
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