Writing Question, please take a look at this sentence. TIA!

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  1. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 19 months ago

    Hi, the sentence below comes up fine on Hemingway, Grammarly and ProWriting, but I can't find the verb. This type of sentence stumps me every time. Does "thanks to" work as a verb? So, technically is it correct? Or am I overthinking this sentence?

    Not the typical green tea, thanks to the lemongrass and minty leaves.

    1. Misbah786 profile image83
      Misbah786posted 19 months agoin reply to this

      I believe it is grammatically correct, and as thank is used for expressing gratitude or appreciation to someone/something, it is a verb. smile

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image91
        Kenna McHughposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Thank you! I had one of the idiotic writer moments.

  2. Sue Adams profile image94
    Sue Adamsposted 19 months ago

    "Not the typical green tea, thanks to the lemongrass and minty leaves."

    The above sentence is grammatically incorrect because, as you say, Kenna, it lacks a verb. "thanks", in this context is not a verb.

    The sentence should read:

    "Thanks to the lemongrass and minty leaves, this is not a typical green tea."
    ("is"= the missing verb)

    Hemingway, Grammarly, and ProWriting algorithms may think that "not the typical green tea" (subject) thanks (says thank you to = verb) lemongrass and minty leaves. But even in that case, the sentence would be:

    Not the typical green tea thanks lemongrass and minty leaves. (without the comma and the word "to").

    Just goes to show, it's best to follow your gut feeling rather than computer language.

    b.t.w. English is my 5th language, Spanish my 6th.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image91
      Kenna McHughposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Ahh, good choice of words.

    2. SerenityHalo profile image94
      SerenityHaloposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      How many languages do you know and which ones? The last detail there caught my attention.

      1. Sue Adams profile image94
        Sue Adamsposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        1. Hungarian -I was born in Budapest, Hungary.
        2. French - Our family fled to Paris when I was four.
        3. Dutch - When I was eleven, we moved to Amsterdam.
        4. German - At eighteen, I  joined a ballet company in Berlin.
        5. English - Aged 26, I moved to London to study choreology, got married, and raised 3 kids.
        6. Spanish - I now live in  Andalucia.

        1. SerenityHalo profile image94
          SerenityHaloposted 19 months agoin reply to this

          This is incredible. I love where your life has taken you. I would be interested in reading more about your experiences.

          1. Sue Adams profile image94
            Sue Adamsposted 19 months agoin reply to this

            All that is off-topic for this forum thread but if you are really interested, I wrote a book. Just Google: "Magda - Sue Adams".

    3. Kenna McHugh profile image91
      Kenna McHughposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Agree! Nice examples!

    4. bravewarrior profile image87
      bravewarriorposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      I would actually say something like; "With the added lemongrass and mint leaves, this is not your typical green tea."

      "Thanks to" just doesn't sit right with me.

  3. PaulGoodman67 profile image95
    PaulGoodman67posted 19 months ago

    It's not a good sentence. I would certainly add a subject and a verb.

    Native English speakers often talk in incomplete sentences but it's not a suitable approach for formal writing, in my opinion.

    You could write the following sentence and I believe it would be fine:

    "It's not a typical green tea, thanks to the lemongrass and minty leaves."

    "Thanks" means "due" in this context and is not a verb.

    1. Misbah786 profile image83
      Misbah786posted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Yes, I think this makes sense!

    2. Kenna McHugh profile image91
      Kenna McHughposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      That makes sense!

  4. Stephen Tomkinson profile image92
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 19 months ago

    Sue and Paul are quite correct. The sentence is technically incomplete because there is no verb. But the sentence does make sense without a verb. I believe that leaving out a word for stylistic effect is known as ellipsis and is very common.
    I could have said:
    Quite right, Sue and Paul.
    Instead of:
    You are quite right, Sue and Paul.

    1. PaulGoodman67 profile image95
      PaulGoodman67posted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Maximum clarity and punchiness are the things to aim for, I believe, when it comes to a sentence.

      1. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        If I remember my Strunk correctly didnt he say it was okay to use a lot of extra words if you are being paid by the word?

      2. Miebakagh57 profile image68
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        This sentence: 'I kick the ball' has a verb, kick. It's complate correct, and make sense.                               And now 'thanks to' your efforts. 'Your' qualified 'to' as a verb. If we replace 'due' with thanks per GeadHead, we still get the verb form.                                                AI can't be a better English language or grammar teacher. It's dumb or  helpless in certain cases.

  5. Stephen Tomkinson profile image92
    Stephen Tomkinsonposted 19 months ago

    Agreed.

  6. Misbah786 profile image83
    Misbah786posted 19 months ago

    From Mountains peaks
    To the sea and valleys.
    Grammar is being rolled,
    By its allies cool

    1. eugbug profile image97
      eugbugposted 19 months ago

      Does it have to be grammatically correct as long as it scans ok? I'm sure many of us start sentences with "so" and "and" which I don't think is "proper". As long as Google doesn't disapprove. If you've read Ulysses, you'll know Joyce through out the grammar manual early on in the novel.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image68
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        ...And, thanks to your ingenuity. So, this sentence is not proper? Just asking. Thanks.

      2. Kenna McHugh profile image91
        Kenna McHughposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Eugbug, you are correct. Pedantic editing has sometimes brought me to my knees or given me an excruciating headache.

        I do like the offer examples here.

      3. eugbug profile image97
        eugbugposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Apologies "Threw out".

        1. DrMark1961 profile image97
          DrMark1961posted 19 months agoin reply to this

          Hahaha. I thowt you was being Jocian on us.

          1. eugbug profile image97
            eugbugposted 19 months agoin reply to this

            big_smile

    2. Shanzyshiza profile image58
      Shanzyshizaposted 19 months ago

      OK, no worries, we can work through this together.

      1. eugbug profile image97
        eugbugposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        True.

    3. PaulGoodman67 profile image95
      PaulGoodman67posted 19 months ago

      One of my favorite poems about grammar:

      COMMA

      How, great,
      to, be, a, comma,
      and, separate,
      one, word, fromma,

      nother.


      Brian, Bilston

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image91
        Kenna McHughposted 19 months agoin reply to this
     
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