Is it whereever or wherever?

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  1. darkside profile image79
    darksideposted 10 years ago

    ¯\(º_o)/¯

  2. Peter M. Lopez profile image86
    Peter M. Lopezposted 10 years ago

    One "E"

    wherever.

  3. charlemont profile image79
    charlemontposted 10 years ago

    LOL
    Then is it 'traveller' or 'traveler'? wink I come across both variations. Same is with jewellery roll

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
      Uninvited Writerposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      I think that is the difference between British English and American English. As far as I know, both are correct.

  4. Mark Knowles profile image60
    Mark Knowlesposted 10 years ago

    American English, LOL

  5. mroconnell profile image72
    mroconnellposted 10 years ago

    I think uninvited writer is right.  Traveller is traditional British spelling.  Do they also do labelled and other verbs like that?

    I've never seen jewellery.  That's a ton of extra letters.

  6. darkside profile image79
    darksideposted 10 years ago

    Wherever it is!

  7. William F. Torpey profile image76
    William F. Torpeyposted 10 years ago

    I always had one guide to spelling: The Associated Press Style Book, which I would advise all writers to follow because most newspapers do so -- or create their own style book. Aside from that, most Americans, I think, prefer not to use British spellings. My teachers at school always recommended using the first referenced spelling in the better dlictionaries. Personally, if there's a choice I always choose single consonants over double consonants, i.e., traveler over traveller. I may be the last of the old school,  but I still believe spelling is important. Anytime I'm not sure, I look it up -- nowadays in dictionary.com

    1. Carolina Crete profile image83
      Carolina Creteposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      William I may be part of the old school too (but not really that old wink ), however personally I always chose double consonants over single - because that's the British spelling which I grew up with, and is 'proper' English wink wink

      Edit; Have just realised / realized that I was searching for hubs on search optimisation earlier.. and the search brought up 0 results. Of course I used the Brit spelling with an 's' instead of a 'z'. Thanks to this thread I realis/zed I should have tried optimiZation hmm

  8. waynet profile image71
    waynetposted 10 years ago

    I'm not sure where the river is..but it'll soon turn up!

    ?I've been at the drink again!

  9. Paraglider profile image94
    Paragliderposted 10 years ago

    British and American spellings are both 'correct', but I sometimes wonder if British web-sites are penalised by search engines that aren't smart enough to know both spellings. Anyone have any insight into this?

    1. Carolina Crete profile image83
      Carolina Creteposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      If the title or main keywords of a site have a different US / English spelling then I think most webmasters are smart enough to use both... but..

      I just put "search engine optimisation" and "search engine optimization" into google.com and google.co.uk and strangely enough the Brit spelling with an 's' returns more results at
      40,500.000 than the American spelling with a 'z', 36,500.000 on both domains.

      So I can only conclude that the American webmasters are smarter wink and use both spellings - i.e. both Americans and Brits are spelling it with 's', while the Brits don't think to also spell it with a 'z' so only Americans are using 'z', and therefore it has less results.

  10. topstuff profile image58
    topstuffposted 10 years ago

    British english is more pure without any futile changes.

  11. charlemont profile image79
    charlemontposted 10 years ago

    Somebody placed this ad on Adwords:
    http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f379/Attentex/GoogleAdJewellery.jpg
    Jewellery!
    Is it American, British, or what? wink

  12. jboland profile image60
    jbolandposted 10 years ago

    ===========
    From Wikipedia:
    Jewellery (also spelled jewelry, see spelling differences) is a personal ornament, such as a necklace, ring, or bracelet, made from gemstones, precious metals or other materials.

    The word jewellery is derived from the word jewel, which was anglicised from the Old French "jouel" around the 13th century. Further tracing leads back to the Latin word "jocale", meaning plaything. Jewellery is one of the oldest forms of body adornment; recently found 100,000 year-old beads made from Nassarius shells are thought to be the oldest known jewellery.
    ==========

    1. JYOTI KOTHARI profile image59
      JYOTI KOTHARIposted 10 years agoin reply to this

      A very informative one. Today, Most of the jewelers in the western world are Jews. Does it link to Jewel or jewelry/ Jewellery?
      jyoti Kothari

      The word jewellery is derived from the word jewel, which was anglicised from the Old French "jouel" around the 13th century. Further tracing leads back to the Latin word "jocale", meaning plaything. Jewellery is one of the oldest forms of body adornment; recently found 100,000 year-old beads made from Nassarius shells are thought to be the oldest known jewellery.
      ==========

  • The Indexer profile image82
    The Indexerposted 10 years ago

    I spend much of my time correcting English, because that is what I do as a proofreader, and I naturally veer towards English spelling and word usage, being a Brit. The dictionary I use 100 times a day (the Encarta World English Dictionary) makes it clear when a spelling is UK or US, and whether an alternative is permissable. However, for "jewellery" it allows no alternatives - "jewellery" is the only spelling it contemplates, although it recognises "jeweler" as the US spelling of "jeweller". (Incidentally, it prefers "recognize" to "recognise"!)

  • charlemont profile image79
    charlemontposted 10 years ago

    That's where the Web has brought us to.
    Type 'jewelry' in Google and see the number of results wink
    I tend to stick to British spelling, too, since this is what I was taught.

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