jump to last post 1-25 of 25 discussions (67 posts)

What catch phrases do you hate or love?

  1. Ciel Clark profile image74
    Ciel Clarkposted 5 years ago

    What catch phrases do you hate or love?

    I like the positive message, but "It's all good," really bugs me for some reason!   On the other hand (another catch phrase...) I don't hate, "C'est la vie..."
    Anyone else?

  2. Laura Schneider profile image91
    Laura Schneiderposted 5 years ago

    Fun question!

    One of my favorites is "A stitch in time saves nine". It's advice I should follow WAY more often. I think Ben Franklin said that. Then there's "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush." And then a pretty serious one, "You can never go back."

    What do I hate? Well, I hate when people abbreviate "Thx" or "K?" for "thanks" or "okay"--is it that big of a deal to spell it out? I mean really, "Thx"--how thankful could they really be if they didn't have time to type a couple more characters to thank you properly?

    The other thing I hate is when people call me "Laurie" instead of "Laura". "Laurie" is a perfectly beautiful name--it's just not mine and they know it, and they say it in a diminutive way, making you feel 4 years old. Anybody else have that problem od having their names being "youth-enized"? Or with being called "Dear" or "Deary" by your older relatives/coworkers?

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image97
      DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm not crazy about goofy abbreviations, either, but, in this day of character-delimited forums such as Twitter, I understand THERE the need to shorten & use as few characters as possible: " 2 B able 2 fit all U need 2 say? K?  Thx."  ;-)

    2. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Somehow proverbs are less irritating (to me)-- "A stitch in time.." is like "Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar.."  One of my foreign adult students was very upset at being called "Ma-am"  --she thought she was being addressed as "Man"  !!

    3. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I forgot to add this one--when people are calling someone else and they say "Hi, it's me". ("me" providing no additional information about the caller.)

  3. SportsBetter profile image77
    SportsBetterposted 5 years ago

    I love "Make it so" which is from Star Trek the Next Generation, Captain Bicard says it all the time. 

    I hate "Were not in Kansas anymore" from Wizard of Oz.  I think it is just played out, even though it was a classic movie.

    The catch phrase I have to say which you might not have heard of is, "Dialing for dollars". Which I have to say to motivate me at work when I am make hundreds of sales calls everyday. 

    But there are so many more catch phrases I enjoy, I wish I had the time to list them all.

    1. profile image0
      Chris Hughposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Haha, I used "We're not in Kansas anymore" in the Hub I wrote.

  4. tsadjatko profile image61
    tsadjatkoposted 5 years ago

    'Let me be clear'  -  I have grown to hate it since I've heard it time and again from President Obama

    Whether President Obama's upcoming State of the Union address focuses on jobs, health care, foreign policy or something else entirely, there is one thing we can count on: Obama will make himself absolutely clear.

    All politicians have their verbal tics -- say, John McCain's "my friends" -- but few resort to their crutches as often as Obama relies on his "let me be clear" set-up. He deploys it in formal speeches as well as in impromptu remarks, meaning that the White House speechmakers have keyed in on the boss's security blanket.

    When Obama says "Let me be clear" he means "for you stooges who are too stupid to understand..."

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co … 72_pf.html

    1. profile image0
      Chris Hughposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for letting me know about this one. I used it too. I should link to you in my Hub.

    2. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with this one. "Let me be clear" leaves no room for conversation, but then again, the President must sometimes be unpopular in order to get something done. Hopefully something good.

    3. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have only heard him say it when it seemed that the audience or media inquisitor was dismissing President Obama's comments or making contrary gestures or misinterpreting what he was saying and he was giving them a verbal cue to pay attention.

  5. Kaili Bisson profile image99
    Kaili Bissonposted 5 years ago

    Great question Ciel,
    I hate "just sayin'" and the overused "thinking outside the box".
    I'll "get back to you" if I come up with any I love  :-)

    1. yaswanthk profile image71
      yaswanthkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Funny.... ;-)

  6. yaswanthk profile image71
    yaswanthkposted 5 years ago

    I love  "Don't go the way life takes you..Take the lift the way you go" ...

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hahahaha I love that one.

  7. Karmallama profile image75
    Karmallamaposted 5 years ago

    I know I sound "uncool" by saying this, but I don't really like the phrase "my bad." Why can't people just apologize instead?
    I do love the phrase "another day in a paradise." I love to say it when people ask how I am doing

    1. profile image0
      Chris Hughposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I used "my bad" too. It's so "five minutes ago." Still, "it is what it is." smile

    2. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ha!  That reminds me-- my mother used to try to say "My bad"  but she would say, "Bad me"

    3. ndaffinee profile image60
      ndaffineeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You do NOT sound uncool. "My bad" does LOL

  8. ytsenoh profile image85
    ytsenohposted 5 years ago

    The phrase, "it is what it is," annoys me to no end because it's over used.  Imagination could lend itself to a new phrase.

    1. profile image0
      Chris Hughposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! That's the one I hate most, I should add it to my Hub.

    2. readwriteteach profile image60
      readwriteteachposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I just knew someone was going to mention this one, but I have to agree. This is so overused that it's just plain irritating.

    3. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, what exactly does that mean? Nothing to me. I hear it in business meetings a lot.

    4. DzyMsLizzy profile image97
      DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @ Patty--as far as I can tell (and I've been guilty of using it myself now & then), it means, "go with the flow;" "don't worry about it;" "there's nothing that can be done about it, so deal with it and move on."

    5. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ug, I agree.  It is what it is.  At the end of the day.  So to say.  It's all good.

  9. carlarmes profile image74
    carlarmesposted 5 years ago

    I hate it when politicians say, "It's the right thing to do".

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm just glad to hear they know what's right and wrong, so they know when they're doing wrong.

    2. SportsBetter profile image77
      SportsBetterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      99% of the time it isn't the right thing to do.  Maybe it is the right thing for their financial position and power grab.

  10. DzyMsLizzy profile image97
    DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years ago

    (I thought I answered this, but it seems my answer didn't post.  So, if this is duplicated, my apologies.)

    I am sick and tired of hearing "green" everything.  Green packaging; green solutions; green energy; green cars;  going green!

    Enough, already. How about something more original?  How about just speaking of being responsible and mindful of our environment?

    Why not save all the  'green' for jealousy, seasickness, trees, grass and Kermit the Frog?

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm with you--just be environmentally a good person. You don't have to be "green" or, worse yet, worry about your "carbon footprint". You have to worry about the planet and other people's need to use it, too, not and in the future.

    2. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Funny!  At our nearest store they sell blue cloth grocery bags printed with the message "This bag is green."

  11. profile image0
    Chris Hughposted 5 years ago

    I made a Hub about it. I hope it's okay to post the link here.

    http://chrishugh.hubpages.com/hub/Writing-Tips-1

    I used some of the suggestions here in my Hub. I should link to you guys. Please let me know if there's a specific page you'd like me to link to.

    1. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Cool!  I will go read it now.  Link to this question page if you want-- we may get more good hate/love catch phrases.  (Hm, now I'm wondering about the word "Cool"  -- but I think I must keep it:  also it is understood in so many countries...)

  12. Melis Ann profile image91
    Melis Annposted 5 years ago

    Phrases like step up to the plate or open-up - pretty much any cliche they say on the show The Bachelor!

  13. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago

    I tuned off from the trite phrase "keep in mind..." while reading content-spun work over three years ago, because it often shows the work of one turning out many 500-word articles for $1.00 each, "keep in mind" being a standard phrase in low-pay freelance work of a kind. The overused phrase can leak into more serious writing and daily speech and be abrasive and phoney.

    "Keep in mind" does not make one sound smart or qualified. It makes one sound too busy to find facts, a superficial filler statement to add to word count or to boost thoughts unable to stand alone with authority. I hope I have broken myself from ever using that phrase again in my lifetime.

    In lighter news, it took me a long while to get used to "Wazzup?" What happened to "Hello, it's great to see you"?

    1. Karmallama profile image75
      Karmallamaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I had never thought of the phrase "keep in mind" that is interesting and I can see it now that you mention it. Thank you for bringing that to my attention

    2. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, a real pet peeve it is.

    3. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Oh yes, "keep in mind"  --that's a good one.  Similar maybe to "as you know,"  -- Oh dear, I think I will have to go reread some of my writings and see which of these phrases have slipped into my writing!

    4. pstraubie48 profile image87
      pstraubie48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sometimes people have said that to me and it was a good thing..they pointed out to me a fact or point that I may have overlooked. If the words are used repeatedly in an article or in every article the writer publishes, then I agree with what you say.

  14. profile image0
    TrinityCatposted 5 years ago

    "No offense". It's ridiculous. If we are to criticize in a constructive manner then there is no need to say it. No offense to anyone. Hehe wink

    1. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes!  Or when someone says,  "It's nothing personal, but..."  Of course it's personal.

    2. Karmallama profile image75
      Karmallamaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have noticed that when a sentence is started or ending in "no offense" the sentence surrounding it is usually pretty offensive.. Or, is that just me who noticed that?

    3. profile image0
      Chris Hughposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Haha. When I'm writing in my cat Twitch's voice, he says that pretty often. And it's always right before he says something very offensive.

    4. profile image0
      TrinityCatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hahahaha! It happens every time.

  15. Victoria Anne profile image97
    Victoria Anneposted 5 years ago

    I hate it when people say "I could care less". That means you care at least a little if you're capable of caring less. "I couldn't care less" makes sense.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image97
      DzyMsLizzyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! "I couldn't care less" is the proper form.  The folks that say "...could..." instead are demonstrating both carelessness and a failure to understand word meanings.

    2. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This type of sentence is always tricky to explain to students studying the English language.

    3. ndaffinee profile image60
      ndaffineeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I totally agree! I've been saying that for years and thought I was alone on that. My husband drives me nuts with it and also says "You better be lucky I..." ugh! You mean "you're lucky I...?" His phrases are wrong all the time. Good grief...

    4. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I actually use both  "I could care less"  and "I couldn't care less"  -- For me the first is more sarcastic, as in "I could care less (but I don't)"  -emphasizing the 'could' to imply the negative.  Hadn't thought about that before!  Good comment.

  16. Mritzert1 profile image78
    Mritzert1posted 5 years ago

    Recently, and especially on social networking sites like facebook and Twitter, everyone seems to be posting YOLO (You only live once). While I never had a problem with this phrase before, people are just using it for everything. For example, "I made toast #YOLO." Because of this, I'd have to say that I've come to dislike this saying.

  17. Kevo1986 profile image58
    Kevo1986posted 5 years ago

    I hate the phrase "it's not rocket science!"  I think because it is often used when I am struggling with something.

    1. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have a friend who is married to a rocket scientist-- I will have to ask what they think of this comment!  (I am guessing they have heard it too often...)

    2. Kevo1986 profile image58
      Kevo1986posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It just annoys me. lol

  18. CyberShelley profile image78
    CyberShelleyposted 5 years ago

    Quite a few have already been mentioned, but a big peeve of mine is "at this point in time" or "let's do lunch"  instead "let's have lunch".

    1. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      How about "Call me!" while wiggling hand near ear with thumb and pinky out.  Hm, that one might be 'old school.'.

  19. Cobrafan profile image80
    Cobrafanposted 5 years ago

    I hate "YOLO." If you're out of  the loop, it means "you only live once." It might be a great saying for anyone who's out there trying to live their life to the max, but it's mostly used by teenagers as an excuse to do dumb things while expecting little to no consequences.

    1. ndaffinee profile image60
      ndaffineeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah I recently discovered this one. I kept seeing it everywhere and had no idea what it was and then I heard it in a song and was like "REALLY???" LOL I'd rather hear or see "you only live once" than YOLO. It just sounds/looks silly to me.

    2. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In the past year or two I have been hearing people say "LOL!"  (not as l.o.l, but as a word rhyming with "doll"  --have you been hearing this?  ndaffinee, what do you think?

  20. Djaak profile image38
    Djaakposted 5 years ago

    I don't know why and I don't even know if it counts but I love to say : "That's what she said." I just cannot stop.

    1. ndaffinee profile image60
      ndaffineeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      LOL. I have an issue with repeating what someone says when I think its hilarious. I'm always saying "she said..." or "he said..." and repeating what someone literally just said LOL. I don't know why but I can't seem to stop either

    2. profile image57
      osa agbonlahorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think Djaak is referring to the gag where saying "that's what she said!" can turn anything into a sexual innuendo.

      You're talking about two different things.

  21. howlermunkey profile image91
    howlermunkeyposted 5 years ago

    I love "It makes sense if you don't think about it"..

    I hate when I'm having a conversation with someone and their replies are "True, True" (even worse True Dat or True Dawg)

    Being a recent transplant to New England from Orlando, it cracks me up the way the word "Wicked" is used up here.. "Wicked Smart", "'Wicked low prices", "Wicked Deals"...

    I heard the best use of the word "Wicked" driving to work the other day. I heard a Bank Commercial touting the fact that they had "Wicked Low Rates!"... A bank....
    (It makes sense if You don't think about it)...

    1. Ciel Clark profile image74
      Ciel Clarkposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ahh,  I have cousins in New England, and the "wicked" thing has stayed with me.  I like it!  It seems to be one of those words that can be positive or negative (like "dude" in California) depending on how you say it.

  22. IDONO profile image81
    IDONOposted 5 years ago

    " Make no mistake about it" Thanks Geo. W.   World's most annoying. " In a perfect world". Every time I hear someone say that, I want to kill someone.
    And what devalues life more than, " Time is money."

  23. shimlahillstation profile image54
    shimlahillstationposted 5 years ago

    I hate "you know" and "I told you so".
    I love "See I was right".

  24. profile image57
    osa agbonlahorposted 5 years ago

    "Good times to be had/were had by all" is one of my favorites even though I only use it mostly out of habit.
    It comes in handy when someone asks me how an event went and I don't feel like describing each detail.
    It also works to sum up what activities will be offered at a get-together I plan/attend.

    My second favorite "Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt" from "Slaughterhouse-5" by Kurt Vonnegut. But it loses its charm each time I see someone misuse it...
    It gets misused a LOT.

  25. thisiknow profile image59
    thisiknowposted 5 years ago

    Hearing someone say “It’s not my job” absolutely drives me crazy especially when it is something simple that would literally take two seconds!

 
working