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Why do we turn out clocks back in the fall (and ahead in the spring)?

  1. bankscottage profile image94
    bankscottageposted 5 years ago

    Why do we turn out clocks back in the fall (and ahead in the spring)?

  2. Sue Adams profile image98
    Sue Adamsposted 5 years ago

    I believe it originated in Scotland when children had to get up in the dark to go to school in winter. They turned the clock back to give people more daylight in winter.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time

    1. bankscottage profile image94
      bankscottageposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I understand your point, but "winter" would be standard time.  It is "summer' where we turn our clocks ahead to get more daylight (DST) in the PM.  If it was for kids in school, we could stay on "winter" standard time all year.

  3. Insane Mundane profile image61
    Insane Mundaneposted 5 years ago

    I used to think the main goal for this, was to save a little electricity in the evening, but now that seems to be debatable as well. Actually, I wished they would just leave the clocks alone.  Speaking of that, I'd like to see a poll were people could vote either for DST (Daylight Saving Time) or against it.  I'm curious as to how many people are for it...  Hmm, I may look that up later, and see if I can find one...

    1. bankscottage profile image94
      bankscottageposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      George Bush, 43, extended DST (now starts earlier and ends later), to save energy by having more useful hours of sunlight.  I agree.  Why not just pick one or the other for the whole year.

    2. Rufus89 profile image83
      Rufus89posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I thought it was a state law. Doesn't Arizona ignore DST and just use the same clock all year?

    3. bankscottage profile image94
      bankscottageposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Rufus, you are correct. (http://www.abc15.com/dpp/news/state/why-arizonans dont-observe-daylight-saving-time)  Arizona does not follow DST, they requested an exemption because of the heat (but the Indian reservations do follow DST).

  4. Rock_nj profile image92
    Rock_njposted 5 years ago

    It goes back to the days when agriculture was the dominant profession.  The idea was to give farmers more time to work in the fields.  Now it is justified mainly by the suppossed energy savings.  I think we could live without it at this point; although it is nice to have those long summer evenings, and they'd be an hour shorter if we did not set the clocks forward in the spring.

  5. one2get2no profile image83
    one2get2noposted 5 years ago

    I believe it's to do with farmers to give them or the crops more light in the morning. Personally I believe that we should stick to BST all year.

  6. Goody5 profile image74
    Goody5posted 5 years ago

    Day light savings time is the practice of advancing clocks so that the evenings have more daylight and mornings have less. This originally benefited the farmers, but now in the modern age many question it's purpose. The state of Arizona doesn't even recognize day light savings time.

    1. Insane Mundane profile image61
      Insane Mundaneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      A true farmer gets up so early and doesn't need a government to tell them when the sun comes up, so how in the hell would it affect 'em?  That is just plain stupid...  Did Wikipedia start this?
      Saving electricity doesn't relate to growing corn...

    2. bankscottage profile image94
      bankscottageposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The state of Arizona requested and was granted an exemption to DST, but the Indian reservations in Arizona do participate (because the reservations span multiple states).

    3. Insane Mundane profile image61
      Insane Mundaneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I wish every State felt that way...
      Either way, have you ever needed help to decide when the sun came up?

 
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