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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (9 posts)

What age do you think is appropriate for a boy to clean a toilet (his bathroom)?

  1. breathe2travel profile image80
    breathe2travelposted 5 years ago

    What age do you think is appropriate for a boy to clean a toilet (his bathroom)?

    My boys share a bathroom.  I have them help keep the sink clean.  I look forward to the day when I know they can clean a toilet without harming themselves (head/face location, etc.).  What age do you think is appropriate for a child to clean a toilet?

  2. Patrice M profile image75
    Patrice Mposted 5 years ago

    Personally I think if they can clean the sink they can clean the toilet. Make sure they are properly protected and monitor them the first few times. I assume they are using some type of chemical to clean the sink so the same can be used for the toilet.

  3. jennagleave profile image58
    jennagleaveposted 5 years ago

    Personally, I think it depends on what products you'll be buying for them to use. For example, you can't really expect a child of under 14 to handle bleach or similar products - and even at that age I'd be cautious. But, you can create home made cleaning products which are non-toxic and far safer to handle that a younger child would be OK to use. I'd say if they're using safe chemicals and can behave sensibly enough then probably 10/11 is when I would expect that they're old enough to take some harder chores on.

    I do think this one's entirely personal though and would expect quite a few varied responses.

  4. LouTucci profile image77
    LouTucciposted 5 years ago

    Your kidding right? If they're old enough to use it, they're old enough to clean it. What's the big deal? A toilet bown brush with a little comet takes care of that, with one of those drop it tablets makes things easier as well. A touch of comet in the sink takes care of the sink. While in the shower, some comet on a sponge once a week prevents soap scum build up on the tiles and you're done. Wish the rest of lifes problems can be so easily resolved!

    1. breathe2travel profile image80
      breathe2travelposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not kidding. Serious. They've had other chorres - from cleaning after playing, dishes, making beds, sweeping, dusting, etc. I have no problem with my 13 year old cleaning her bathroom completely alone. Was seriously curious about boys. Thank you. smile

  5. adawnmorrison profile image76
    adawnmorrisonposted 5 years ago

    My youngest son is five, has been cleaning the toilet since he was four, and still thinks it's fun, though I'm sure that will change.  He has used Comet, but also uses just plain soda after I "force-flush" with a bucket of water so it's not so diluted.  He is the most accident-prone kid I have, and there's no way he'll get a toilet cleaning injury.

  6. MomTech profile image74
    MomTechposted 5 years ago

    Start with supervision at and inspection at age 5 but don't let loose with chemicals unsupervised until they have demonstrated some care  which should be around 8 or 9 depending on the kid.  Some longer

  7. teddi6 profile image76
    teddi6posted 5 years ago

    I started my son when he was 7, supervised.  His aim in the porcelain throne was so awful.  I wanted him to know what it felt like to clean that stuff.

    He could manage the sink and the bathtub - no problem.  I think the commode just grossed him out, which was great.  As soon as the job became his, his aim got a lot more precise.  If he missed, he got out the cleaner right away and cleaned. It was his bathroom, all stains belonged solely to him.

    Unfortunately, my cleaning habits didn't take because I went to his apartment and went to the bathroom just to check it out. I swear I thought I was walking into a Texaco station.  It was a scary movie, to say the least.  I made him clean it so I could use it.  Naturally, the roommates are the pigs, not him.

    For Pete's sake....start him young...when he's old enough to squeeze a sponge!

  8. profile image56
    kdawsonposted 5 years ago

    Depends on the boy.  If they can clean a sink I guess they can clean a toilet, but if one or all of them are particularly distressed by "gross things," you might want to take it easy.  I never really forced much of anything on my kids, but eased them into it.  Push too hard and you're liable to run up against their stubborn and then it might turn into a power struggle and turn all kinds of ugly.

 
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