Melaleuca?

Jump to Last Post 1-14 of 14 discussions (39 posts)
  1. Fluffymetal profile image78
    Fluffymetalposted 8 years ago

    Have you heard of it?  If so what have you heard?  I want to know peoples opinions?  If you haven't heard of it say so.

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      DONT SELL IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Its ok, the stuff works, but its way overpriced no one will buy it and besides that, the whole scheme is to get more people under you to sell, there isnt much money in the actual sellgin of product. Oh, but I the make up is pretty fun..I mean... its a bad bad bad idea!! my Mom lost hundreds of dollars...

      dont do it !!!

      1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image92
        Patty Inglish, MSposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I purchase a larger bottle of tea oil at a department store for under $6.00; the Melaluca brand is three times the cost, same size.  Melaluca may be better quality, though; I'm not sure.

        1. profile image0
          Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I have no problem with the products, they are good. its the whole MLM scheme.

    2. Specialk3749 profile image59
      Specialk3749posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I love their products, especially the laundry system.  It last sooooo long and with a family of 9 it helps.  They do require that you buy a monthly number of points, and that can be hard to fulfill at times, but if you have other people to help you buy them it can be easy.  If you are a good sales person you may be able to do it as a business, but I am not a sales person so the business didn't go well for me....I still buy their products!  My advice is to try it.  You can always cancel!

      1. Fluffymetal profile image78
        Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Thanks for the encouragement

  2. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    The plant or the store?

    1. Fluffymetal profile image78
      Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      the store... "business"

      1. profile image0
        pburgerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I bought some of their products - with half-an-idea of joining them. The products were create! 2 litres of clothes washing liquid lasted me 2 years! But I couldn't come to the grips with their business structure...

  3. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    I just know they sell supplements and vitamins...right?

  4. darkside profile image81
    darksideposted 8 years ago

    MLM is a terrible way to make money.

    Because they tell you "it's easy, it sells itself".

    It doesn't.

    They'll also say "do it part time, just a few hours a week".

    And when that doesn't work for you, they'll tell you you need to invest more time and to get serious with it.

    If you're thinking of joining an MLM, first do a Google search for mlm deception.

    1. Fluffymetal profile image78
      Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I'm going to try it.   i just wanted some feedback.  I'm not trying to get richI But I do want honest opinions. Thanks

    2. profile image0
      Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      This!!!! Its such a bad idea!!! Its so sneaky in its wording, they try to make it all..oh no, this istn MLM..but it really is.

  5. salt profile image70
    saltposted 8 years ago

    i thought it was or is a type of australian eucalyt tree.

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      it is, but there is also a company that sells products made with it and its not a good company.

  6. profile image0
    Audreveaposted 8 years ago

    Never heard of the company/store. We can buy it in the supermarket in Australia. Great for stings and respiratory issues etc.

  7. Misha profile image71
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    Stay away. Seriously. smile

  8. Veronica Allen profile image67
    Veronica Allenposted 8 years ago

    I have used their products - and love them. However, since we are a family of four on one budget, they were a little too pricey for me. I have never sold any of their products however.

    1. Fluffymetal profile image78
      Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      What I'm learning is f you are a preferred customer, you can buy the products at wholesale prices.  They are actually cheaper. 

      I don't see a bad thing about trying to get people to want to switch to a brand of products that are safer for them and the earth. It kind of makes me feel good.  Is that wrong?

      Thanks for being honest you guys.

      1. Sally's Trove profile image80
        Sally's Troveposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I love their products, and am always happy to be gifted with anything from Melaleuca by my cousin who has been in the business for a very long time. As for the MLM structure, learn all you can before making a commitment.

      2. rebekahELLE profile image84
        rebekahELLEposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        that's the lure these mlm companies use. and they go to great expense to try to bring people in, the wholesale price is one way, health, wealth... I looked into a mlm company out of CA that seemed like it had the cure to everything. when my brother-in-law started telling me more how it works, I said, forget it. it sounded like brainwashing to me how the mlm structure operates.

        I wouldn't waste my time if I were you, especially if they're asking for a financial investment, which many of them require.
        you may find yourself stuck with a lot of product!

      3. darkside profile image81
        darksideposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Bookmark this thread and a year from now come back and tell us how you still feel about it.

        1. figment profile image80
          figmentposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I'm keeping a blog about the experience and linked to my hub

  9. figment profile image80
    figmentposted 8 years ago

    I wrote a hub recently about it which explains a lot

  10. Sally's Trove profile image80
    Sally's Troveposted 8 years ago

    Fluffymetal, I'd like to add another thought here for you.

    Many years ago, a friend of mine became involved in a nutritional supplement company (not Melaleuca) and asked if I'd use some of the protein products in my baked goods. I agreed...it seemed like such a good idea. I modified my recipes, incorporating the protein products, and the results were quite good and probably nutritious. He liked them and bought them.

    Then one day, he asked if I'd like to host a party to show off these baked goods, and I agreed. I invited mutual friends and people from a list my friend provided, and we had a lovely evening. At the end of the evening, my friend said to me, "So, what's your interest here? Do you want to get on the bandwagon with these products or not?"

    I was stunned...what he was looking for was someone to join his MLM team, but he had never told me that. I'd been baking these treats, in a business agreement with him, he the buyer and I the supplier. And that was fine. But now, he was wanting to change the agreement between us.

    I had to wonder what lack of honesty an MLM structure demands in order to succeed. Clearly, he had something on his mind, something different from what was on my mind, from the beginning.

    1. darkside profile image81
      darksideposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Sadly that is a recurring theme.

  11. ngureco profile image81
    ngurecoposted 8 years ago

    35% of what you pay goes to the cost of the products. 65% of what you pay goes to a pyramid scheme.

    1. Fluffymetal profile image78
      Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I by no means am a deceiving person or a sales person.  I should have confided on the forums before I jumped to this, but what I will say is this... take the money aside and pretend I wouldn't be earning any money for recommending these products ( I didn't get in this to get rich - just a little extra cash)... is it wrong that I do want to recommend these products because they are healthier and safer.

      1. profile image0
        Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        not at all. the products are good.

        but you do need to consider the business.

        suppose you dont earn a penny, in fact. like my mother who said all you are saying now, you loose hundreds. BUT your ok with that, because they are healthy products.

        conisder the fact that you are now helping, supporting, and promoting a company that will swindle more mothers out of hundreds of dollars.

        You can find good healthy products elsewhere.

        1. figment profile image80
          figmentposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          good point, but the more I read the more it seems to be like purchasing a Sam's membership with a commitment to buy at least $50 dollars a month of their variety of products.  BUT that was the part I didn't catch when I signed up.

          1. profile image0
            Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I hate sams club, and walmart. so I may not be the right person to be asking.

            1. Fluffymetal profile image78
              Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Amen sister

              1. profile image0
                Justine76posted 8 years agoin reply to this

                big_smile  whatever you do, I hope it works well. Just pelase read the fine print.

      2. ngureco profile image81
        ngurecoposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        If the programme is fairly new – products have not saturated the market, you don’t just make a little cash but a lot of cash. In fact there is so much cash in it that you may soon start wondering why we have poor people in this world. The bad thing is that it’s only about 1% of those who join that make that kind of money. The other 99% will live to curse that programme.

        When you sell (recommend) the products, you do it to your friends and associates. Then the question is: are you willing to recommend some vitamins tablets to your friends for $100 dollars when they can buy the same for $30 in the local stores? If you are comfortable with that, then go ahead and join the programme.

        I know of very many people who are successful in this whilst at the same time I know of even a bigger number of people who joined such programmes and are very unhappy because they wasted their money and time.

        If I am your friend, I do not expect you to put me in trouble when at the back of your mind you know very well that what you are recommending to me is sugar coated poison.

        Surprisingly, you will find your local doctors and nurses in it.

        1. Fluffymetal profile image78
          Fluffymetalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Thank you for your great input!

        2. darkside profile image81
          darksideposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I brought up the same comparison in hub/agel_vs_pills which I published 3 years ago.

          Nothing has changed. Except for the price of these MLM products going up.

  12. Fluffymetal profile image78
    Fluffymetalposted 8 years ago

    There products are really cheaper than brand names at stores like walmart, but I'm going to stop talking about it b/c I don't want to sound like I'm using this thread to sell anything.  I just wanted to know what people have heard.

  13. Robz105 profile image69
    Robz105posted 8 years ago

    I was interested in it for a while until I realized that you have to be a paying customer in order to sell the products. To change all your products at once (you have to buy a minimum amount, don't remember what it is) is just not feesible if you can't afford it.

  14. MikeNV profile image78
    MikeNVposted 8 years ago

    Just another MLM.  Products typically of good quality but high priced.  I've used their Laundry Soap... it's okay. But I didn't buy it.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)