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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (14 posts)

Challenges of raising teenagers

  1. sassysexybossy profile image59
    sassysexybossyposted 6 years ago

    I have one teen and one about to be a teen. I love my kids but it is a challege when they become a teenager.

    1. SimeyC profile image97
      SimeyCposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Mine are 20, turning 21 - it doesn't stop once they become non-teens!!!!

    2. Pascale1973 profile image76
      Pascale1973posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I have 3 year old triplets, 2 girls, one boy, I am not looking forward to teen...

    3. miguel91 profile image59
      miguel91posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Teens might be a challenge, but they always tend to surprise you in many ways.

    4. roxanne459 profile image87
      roxanne459posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The teen years are hard on everyone, especially the teen! I think if we all do our best to remember how confusing and erratic it was at times we can approach our own kids with compassion and a firm commitment to help them be their very best! smile

  2. Disturbia profile image60
    Disturbiaposted 6 years ago

    Mine are 21 and 16, just smack they upside the head every now and again and they'll be fine. Eventually they do grow out of it.  I know I did, and in many ways I was much worse than either of my children.

  3. alphagirl profile image82
    alphagirlposted 6 years ago

    It is hair raising when you have 2 in their tween and teens. I never know which end is up from day to day because it depends on what has happened to them that day in school. Mine can come home growling because they have had to maintain their composure at school and then they let it out at home.

    I have learned not to ask how was your day as soon as they get home. They don't want me questioning. They just want a tender arm or ear. I often ask how I will make through high school.

    On the good days they are like quiet sheep, content smiley as is most kids.

    Throw in the hormones and you have lava that can erupt at any given moment if the mood strikes them. LOL

    I remove myself and let them cool, or just ignore them until they come to their senses.

    I have in the past removed all electronic gadgets and no TV for 2 days straight. The phone is a big debate because I need to be able to reach them from work.

    I try to remember what it was like to be a teen.

  4. Kim Cantrell profile image60
    Kim Cantrellposted 6 years ago

    Yep, been there done that and still doing it.  I've got a 20 year old in college and a 16 year old at home.  I'd take a houseful of toddlers over one teenager any day!

    Fortunately, mine are both boys and I've been told that's so much easier than girls.  I have a 2 year old daughter right now, so I guess I'll find out in about 11 years or so.

  5. profile image0
    LillyGposted 6 years ago

    My two eldest are entering teenage years and oh my. I am worried about the fact I may have been like this when I was a teenager. I miss the baby years but I know they must grow and mature. Doesn't make it any easier, but I think us parents will survive as our parent's before us.

  6. jennjenn519 profile image54
    jennjenn519posted 6 years ago

    I have a 16 year old girl should puberty at 10, and has acted like a teenager ever since. She can go from crying and yelling one moment, to laughing and joking the next. I almost thought she was bi-polar at one time! Her life revolves around her boyfriend. She has started to behave a little better since she got her driver's permit.

    Now, I also have my 12 year old son going through the same things. He is 12, and cries at the drop of a hat, has a girlfriend, and freaks out when he doesn't get his way. He is a completely different child. I was really hoping the teenage years would be different with him than they were with my girl, but apparently not :-/.

    So, here it goes again, starting all over.

  7. rodelmore profile image60
    rodelmoreposted 6 years ago

    I have 9 children 4 boys and 5 girls.  I too understand the difficulties in raising teens. With a 21, 20, 18, 15, 14, 14, 10, 7, and 4 year old, I have truly learned a lot in the area of personality differences.  There is never a shortage of training opportunities with my children.

    Rod Elmore
    Life Coach
    Askrodnow.org

    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6042404_f248.jpg

    1. sassysexybossy profile image59
      sassysexybossyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      You have a nice looking family.

  8. sassysexybossy profile image59
    sassysexybossyposted 6 years ago

    That's true.

  9. sassysexybossy profile image59
    sassysexybossyposted 6 years ago

    That was well said.

 
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