This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-12 of 12 discussions (21 posts)

How do your kids feel loved by you?

  1. profile image0
    kelleywardposted 6 years ago

    I'm working on a hub right now and need some help. If you are a parent of a child 12 and under could you ask you child or children the following question, "How do you feel loved by me?" Then could you tell me how they responded to that question, word for word? Thanks so much!!

    1. sallieannluvslife profile image85
      sallieannluvslifeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      My boys (15 and 19) say that they feel loved when I hug them, tell them I love them and make them their favorite foods!

  2. leenamartha profile image39
    leenamarthaposted 6 years ago

    I've no experience of kind because I'm not married and there are no child in my home. thanks for sharing this beautiful information.

  3. roxanne459 profile image89
    roxanne459posted 6 years ago

    I have two boys that are under 12 years old and I will definitley ask them after school and get back to you. wink

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks you!!

  4. Ardie profile image75
    Ardieposted 6 years ago

    This is an interesting question!  All three of my daughters are under 12 (One will be 11 this March and the other two are 6 and 7).  I'll ask and get back to you!!

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks looking forward to their answers!

  5. ThePracticalMommy profile image95
    ThePracticalMommyposted 6 years ago

    I just asked my son, who's going to be four in June. His response? "You're my mom!". When I prodded further, he said "Well, you do make me breakfast...". wink

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      How sweet!! Thanks for asking

  6. roxanne459 profile image89
    roxanne459posted 6 years ago

    My 9 year old son said, "You do buy me video games" and my 11 year old son said, "Because you hug me all the time" Not exactly poetry but I hope it helps. Happy Hubbing!

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Definitely helps!! That is so sweet! I guess it's poetry to them

  7. MsDora profile image96
    MsDoraposted 6 years ago

    My children are adults and leading their own lives in different states.  They know that I love them because I go the extra mile to make sure that we keep in touch; because I'm always praying for them; because I welcome every opportunity to visit them.

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That is great ms Dora that although your kids are grown it's important for you to keep in touch with them, pray for them, and see them as often as you can! I'm sure they love being supported by you!!

    2. MsDora profile image96
      MsDoraposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Kelly, I missed the part about the child under 12.  Sorry about that.  However, I see that you are getting some relevant answers.  Happy about that.  Thanks for your kind response!

  8. Lisa HW profile image70
    Lisa HWposted 6 years ago

    This is a "from-the-archives" story because my kids are now grown, but there was one story my eldest son always told, both when he was younger than 12 and later.  It wasn't about his feeling loved by me, but his feeling very loved by his grandmother (my mother).

    He'd always say, "Nana always knows how to make me happier, and I don't even know how she's knows when I'm not happy."

    He'd then bring up the time when he was in kindergarten and the children were being given candy apples around Halloween.   My son was a gentle little boy who wasn't about to muscle his way into crowds in order to be at the beginning of a line, so on the candy apple day it turned out they ran out before they got to him.  Being five, he felt pretty left out.  With the kindergarten half-day, he was soon on the bus to go to my mother's house (I worked part time, so that was the arrangement).

    He was amazed to discover that when he got to my mother's house she had candy apples waiting.  He'd always say, "I don't know how Nana always knows stuff, but she always does and she always make things OK.  I was so happy when I got to her house and she had candy apples."   He'd always mention how he could have all the apples he wanted because Nana had made a whole tray of them.  smile

    I don't really know how my mother knew, or guessed (or whether it was just because it was around Halloween time).  I never asked because I didn't want to know if there was a less mysterious answer.  For all I know, the school may have called to tell my mother he was upset and why.  If that was the case, she hadn't had much time to whip up a bunch of candy apples, I know my son felt absolutely loved by us all because he was.  The candy-apple incident, however, was one that has stuck in his head to this day.

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Wow that was such a touching story. That completely demonstrates that there are many different ways a child or adult for that matter can feel loved. I think you are so patient to let this be a mystery. Your story reminds me that not all things need to be known, uncovered, etc especially if the unknown heals. Thanks so much for sharing. I'm blessed by your story!

  9. Polly C profile image94
    Polly Cposted 6 years ago

    I just asked my son, who will be four next month. He had a one word answer - 'kisses'.

    I will ask my other son, who will be 12 in May, when he gets home from school.

    1. profile image0
      kelleywardposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Polly C that is so cute kisses!!! Im looking forward to hearing about your other son ! Thanks for sharing.

  10. ALUR profile image65
    ALURposted 6 years ago

    I try to show them they are safe and secure. We have a lot of fun clowning around. I think being there through thick and thin shows them-if not now, in the near future that they are loved

  11. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 6 years ago

    Small things are important to kids. When I was a little girl I thought that my mom did not love me, because she never praised me, or hugged, or kissed. I really felt unloved. Only when I grew up and had my own children I realised that she loved me very much, just could not express that love the way I needed.
    But then times where different, people in Europe suffered war, half of Europe was in ruins, my mom was lucky to be alive. Even after war people had nothing and you could not buy anything. Well,now, if you are not going to create a military camp in your household, kids will know that you love them very much by the way you care. On the second thought - may be not. You can easily spoil them too!

  12. jacqui2011 profile image84
    jacqui2011posted 6 years ago

    Hi, I just asked my 10 year old daughter how she feels loved by me, and this was her response:

    She said that it's when I hug her and tell her that I love her. (I tell her every day, it is more important now than ever because her dad and I split up a few years ago. We live 400 miles apart and he doesn't get in touch with her very often)

    She also said that it's when we spend time together talking and snuggling up in front of the television in our pajamas.

    She is very quiet and doesn't have a lot of confidence. She has been bullied at school recently and I have had to approach the school to have the matter dealt with. She says she knows I love her because I sorted out the bullies and that made her happy.

    Hope that this helps.

 
working