Getting kids to eat vegetables

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  1. Denise Handlon profile image89
    Denise Handlonposted 5 years ago

    Do your kids eat vegetables and at what age did you introduce vegetables in their diet; was it difficult or easy to get them to eat veggies?   Do you 'hide' or disguise the veggies or serve it plain?

    1. cvanthul profile image92
      cvanthulposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Per my mom's advice, when I started my son on baby food, I started with vegetables, then fruit, then meat.  The reasoning was he would have developed a healthy taste for vegetables by the time I introduced him to the sweetness in the fruit which, done in reverse, would have spoiled his taste for veggies.  It seems to have worked.  He eats the normal salad variety - lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers - as well as broccoli, beans, yellow squash, sweet peppers, and zucchini.  He'll eat eggplant also, as long as it's baked or fried.  Mushrooms and onions I have to hide in spaghetti sauce, lol.  He also has a healthy taste for fruit - apples, watermelon, cantaloupe, pineapple, kiwi (his favorite), any citrus fruit, bananas, grapes, strawberries, blackberries.

      I agree the attitude towards the veggies has a lot to do with it, but not all of it.  My brother and I were raised on the exact same meals and he still loathes veggies.  I love them.  So it does sometimes come down simply to individual preferences, though I have to say that my brother will eat veggies knowing he needs to. 

      My son and I, he's 8 now, we grow a garden every year and that gets him pretty excited about eating the veggies too.  He likes cultivating them and then tasting the difference between the store-bought and the fresh, though we do shop for ours at farmers markets and the like quite a bit.  One thing that has helped tremendously in the past year - when I divorced I stopped buying all the frozen and boxed stuff that ex-hubby liked so much.  I rarely use bottled spices or herbs either as we now have a nice herb garden.  The difference in taste from boxed to fresh is amazing though it DOES take a little getting used to.

      1. Denise Handlon profile image89
        Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Thanks for your input here.  It's interesting that your brother doesn't like veggies at all, haha.  That's wonderful that your son is into growing his own vegetables!  I agree-fresh food is the way to go!  Good for you, mom. 

        I think I can relate to the advice your mom gave-it does make sense.  Thanks for sharing.

    2. grumpiornot profile image83
      grumpiornotposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Some might find this tasteless, but I laugh.
      What is the difference between broccoli and snot?
      You can't get kids to eat broccoli.

      1. Denise Handlon profile image89
        Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Yeah you can...I've witnessed BOTH many times over, lol

  2. Denise Handlon profile image89
    Denise Handlonposted 5 years ago

    I did not have a problem getting my kids to eat vegetables because I served it as part of their whole meal, and I did not make a big deal about it.   They grew up eating stuff like broccoli, eggplant, zucchini, etc  without whimpering about it.   

    What's been your experience?

  3. kathleenkat profile image79
    kathleenkatposted 5 years ago

    I don't have kids. But when I was a kid, I hated veggies. I did, however, love them in cheese sauce! I don't know how healthy that is, but it got me to eat them.

    I still have issues eating them =X. Whenever I'm visiting my parents, they make me eat them, still...

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting that the cheese sauce you ate as a child you cannot as an adult due to the lactose intolerance.   

      I remember those Green Giant broccoli with cheese sauce packages!

      1. kathleenkat profile image79
        kathleenkatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Yeah, I miss being able to eat milk products, and well, all the junk food I could eat as a kid and not gain a pound. I remember those broccoli cheese bags, microwavable if I recall big_smile

        1. Denise Handlon profile image89
          Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Gee, I used to be as slim as a rail!   Way more active than I am now, not to mention the aging process.  My metabolism is WAY d
                                                                                                   o
                                                                                                        w
                                                                                                             n
                                                                                                                  !!!!

          So, now if I just look at food I gain weight!    smile

  4. TheMagician profile image87
    TheMagicianposted 5 years ago

    I'm 19 and I still don't eat vegetables.
    Unless they're potatoes (starches) or corn (no nutritional value whatsoever).

    I never understood the whole "growing out of being a picky eater" stage.
    Looks like I'm destined to live off mac and cheese & hot dogs for life.

    1. kathleenkat profile image79
      kathleenkatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Haha! My dad still eats that stuff and he's in his 50s. Did you know potatoes and corn are technically not veggies? tongue

      1. TheMagician profile image87
        TheMagicianposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I didn't know corn wasn't! Wow, that's weird. Looks like I'm all out of vegetables to claim I do eat then D:

    2. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      lol   Wow, TheMagician... do you like vegetables in other foods, say like a chicken pot pie?   Or a Shepards pie?   Maybe go back to Kathleenkat's trick of hiding them and disguising them like in Cheese sauce!

      1. TheMagician profile image87
        TheMagicianposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Nope, can't even hide them... I mean unless it's like, a spaghetti sauce. That's it. I'm a super picky eater unfortunately. Which sucks, because going through the check-out lines and seeing all those food magazines; I love the colors and the foods look great, but goodness would I never touch 96% of what's in them with a 30ft fork lol

        Rule of thumb: if it's got more than 3 syllables in the name, I'm not touchin' it =P

        1. Denise Handlon profile image89
          Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          lol  That's funny.  I know what you mean about the appeal of the food mags. It gets me every time, and they are NOT cheap.  I usually thumb through them, and then tell myself I can get it in the library.  Once in awhile I'll come across a 'must have' and break down and buy it.

  5. Danette Watt profile image83
    Danette Wattposted 5 years ago

    How we raise our kids with attitudes toward veggies makes a big difference.

    Pretty much like you, Denise, I just gave my kids the veggies and fruits as part of our meals. Quincy's mom, as you know, was not only not a good cook but she rarely served them fresh veggies and fruits. To this day, he is a poor eater when it comes to anything more than potatoes and corn (although I have gotten him to eat more salads the past few years).

    I must have done something right b/c one son is a vegetarian and the other has told me he misses his fresh fruit and veggies when he doesn't get them.

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great job, sis.   Emphasis on the 'in-law' NOT being a good cook, lol     Well, with your interest and devotion to your community garden it does not surprise me that you have one son who is a vegetarian.  smile

  6. Hollie Thomas profile image60
    Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago

    My son hated vegetables for the first ten years of his life. I used to make soups with vegetable's and then puree them so they didn't look vegetables. I'd use sweet vegetables like red pepper and carrots. He'd ask what they were made from and I'd say "allsorts" he'd eat the lot.

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Very ingenious 'mom' Hollie.  smile   That's solving a problem that is for the best for your child.

  7. Second Lives profile image57
    Second Livesposted 5 years ago

    Mind it I am not joking, but vegetarian diet makes a person live longer lives, and look pretty.

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I know you are probably absolutely right, Second LIves.   I know you aren't joking.   It's too bad our society has focused so much on 'MEAT'  !

  8. Stacie L profile image86
    Stacie Lposted 5 years ago

    I like the idea of mixing them with fruits in a drink or shake or other recipes with meats for a stew, or soup.
    Attitude does have a big affect on their liking veggies or not.
    I can't be a vegetarian even though I know it's healthier for me.

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Well, Stacie-I think that when you have a realization then it opens the door for all sorts of creative opportunities for eating healthy within your food tastes.   smile

  9. Meg Davis profile image72
    Meg Davisposted 5 years ago

    I have two boys and they couldn't be more different when it comes to eating.  My older boy loves veggies and is a very adventurous eater.  In fact he complained the other day that his school cafeteria never serves Thai food!  Haha!  the other one would be happy to exist solely on chicken nuggets and hotdogs.  I've done the same things with both of them in regards to food but they just are who they are.  Go figure.

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      smile  Yeah, go figure...Thai food!  Wow!

  10. leahlefler profile image97
    leahleflerposted 5 years ago

    We always serve vegetables as part of our dinner - both of our boys eat broccoli, carrots, green beans, salad, etc. My older son cannot stand to have his vegetables cooked (he particularly hates cooked carrots), but he'll eat almost any vegetable "raw."

    We've never made a big deal about it, and have offered them veggies from toddlerhood (and even as babies, in pureed form).

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That seems to be the key-get them introduced to the food early.  smile

  11. Novel Treasure profile image87
    Novel Treasureposted 5 years ago

    My kids actually do farely well eating vegetables and some of the other not so pleasant fruit like prunes. We introduced them early on as soon as they could start eating babyfood, so I guess around 6 months.

    If I try a new vegetable that they have never had I just ask them to try a bite and if they don't like it I don't force them to eat them. But kids taste buds change over time, so don't be afraid to try it again or cooked a different way.

    1. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You make a great point that the little one's taste buds do change over time.

 
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