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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (20 posts)

Which country has the most healthy food?

  1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
    Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years ago

    Which country has the most healthy food?

  2. tiagoz profile image60
    tiagozposted 5 years ago

    Hmm hard one, I guess it`s probably a couple of countries but considering the culinaries of the countries that I know, I would say Brazilians eat very healthy, I mean, lots of vegetables and fruits everyday, but they also consume a lot of pesticides.

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've been to Brazil, the food is excellent, I never knew there were so many fruits, it was amazing. They also have so many vegetables I have never eaten before.

  3. Attikos profile image79
    Attikosposted 5 years ago

    Despite volumes published about it in recent years, no one knows. There is no reliable means of measurement and comparison. It cannot even be said that a correlation has been established between diet, good health and longevity. We can only assume there is one and focus on the characteristics of the cuisines of the world's apparently healthier societies: plenty of fish, limited red meats, lots of vegetables, fruits and legumes. Japan, Northern Europe, China, France, Spain and some others all fit that description. The United States, however, does not, yet it is in the top tier of the planet's healthiest nations, so don't take all this too seriously. We just don't know.

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's true we cannot be sure and our health depends on many factors not just our nutrition. I just learned from another hubber that Japan has an obesity rate of 1.5% and a life expectancy of 82 years. Many think this is thanks to their nutrition.

  4. DrMark1961 profile image98
    DrMark1961posted 5 years ago

    just a comment about Brazil: most of the people survive on black beans and rice, supplemented every day with farofa, which is a flour made from mandioca. Mandioca is one of the poorest carbohydrate sources in the world, will grow anywhere as it has no nutrients

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Being low in carbohydrates is not a bad thing, since too many carbohydrates lead to obesity. Also Brazilians supplement beans and rice with lots of vegetables. Whenever I travel there, my plate has at least 5 things of which 3 are vegetables.

    2. DrMark1961 profile image98
      DrMark1961posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The mandioca root is ONLY carbohydrate, it contains nothing else. The plates served to tourists contain a lot of vegetables, the natives eat a lot of starch, fewer veggies

    3. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I visit my in laws 2-3 times a year in Rio and they always serve a lot of veggies.

    4. DrMark1961 profile image98
      DrMark1961posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes there are regions, and certain families, a lot more concious of nutrition. In the northeast food tastes good but it is very fattening, in Sao Paulo area they have a lot more vegetables in the basic diet. Didnt mean to be offensive about "tourist"

    5. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      no worries, yes the meals are different in each region, that's true and that is very interesting for tourists traveling to different regions in Brazil.

  5. profile image0
    Sarah Hurstposted 5 years ago

    Given the availability of healthy foods in America, I would have to say that the United States has the most healthy food. Now, one can argue that we aren't the healthiest nation, but we do have an abundance of great fruits, vegetables, meats, and grains from our own backyards and from other nations. Our diets may not be a reflection of our food blessings, but I definitely think we are most advantageous than many, many other countries worldwide.

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Of course the United States has access to a wide variety of food products and fresh produce and they are able to afford it unlike many unfortunate people in developing and underdeveloped countries. People in the US can make their own food choices.

  6. dinkan53 profile image77
    dinkan53posted 5 years ago

    If taken into account the obesity rate of 1.5% and the life expectancy of 82years Japan is the country which has most healthy food. Large scale consumption of vegetables, fish and soy is one of the secrets of their long lives.

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      that's interesting, so this is definitely evidence that meat does not make us "strong and healthy", like many people still think, at least red meat.

    2. Turtlewoman profile image95
      Turtlewomanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. Meat does not make you "strong and healthy"...complete protein does! You can get better sources of protein tham red meat. Your body actually works harder to digest protein from red meat, compared to plant protein.

  7. yoginijoy profile image71
    yoginijoyposted 5 years ago

    I remember on Dr. Oz not that long ago he did a special on this very topic. I don't remember the top five countries, but one of the best places was Okinawa, Japan. I believe it was the quantity of fish and seafood as well as the pace of life which can be equated to less stress. I guess the less red meat, the more fish, veggies and fruit one consumes aids in our health. The other side is the activity, such as walking or biking to one's destination. Stay healthy and don't eat too much beef in Argentina!

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I believe that is true, the less red meat the better! Actually I am a vegetarian. Everybody asks me why I went to Argentina being a vegetarian. But actually the variety of vegetables is bigger here than in Germany thanks to the climate.

  8. Mayaanjali profile image67
    Mayaanjaliposted 5 years ago

    Mexican Food - has lots of beans, salads and cheese

    1. Jennifer Madison profile image89
      Jennifer Madisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, and it also tastes great!

 
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