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I was diagnosed bipolar at age sixteen

  1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
    schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago

    The following is an account of what I now remember better:

    Starting to Remember

    A Reign of Control
    I had a normal childhood up until my 15th year when Catherine and my mom started influencing me.  Catherine told me to wear nun clothes like her. I lost my friends. Then she decided to enter a convent and had mom make me go along, convincing me it was a good idea. I moved to Kentucky and lived with a family there.
    After thinking the family was normal and mine wasn’t, when I got home I was argumentive and wanted to run away fearing my family was crazy. Dad didn’t like me trying to run away and became controlling and yelled in my face a lot. Scared, I still tried to run away.
    When I got to the hospital, I had had no hallucinations, had not abused drugs or alcohol, not had sex, was innocent.  I had no sucidial thoughts or homicidal thoughts. I was just scared and angry at my family and wanted to go away.
    Soon I was put on mind changing drugs like Lithium for the next twenty years.
    Like I said, I had not hallucinated, not harmed myself or anyone, not threatened anyone and I had to pretend to be suicidal to get into the hospital. My mom was with me, I was sixteen years old.

    I had convinced myself something was wrong with Me. I had found a flyer in nami about bipolar and thought I had the symptoms but I never spent money or anything manic. All I had was temporary depression and nervousness, what I thought was paranoia was I was afraid and social anxiety.

    1. galleryofgrace profile image82
      galleryofgraceposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Sorry you've gone through this. I've dealt with family members and friends who had a variety of disorders. You may want to read some material on Aspergers Syndrome. It's interesting.

      1. tobusiness profile image85
        tobusinessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You are very brave to be able to share you experiences, I'm sure it well help others who are going through similar situation. Take care and I wish you all the best for the future.

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
          schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          thank you tobusiness smile

      2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks

      3. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I might have aspergers, not sure.

    2. aguasilver profile image89
      aguasilverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I think you are just highly intelligent and probably have been misunderstood, and wrongly prescribed, and seriously disadvantaged by the drugs you have been fed.

      I also think that you will be restored to perfect mental health, and hope that it will be fast, and permanently dealt with.

      I'm on FB if you want to speak at any time.

      John

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks John

      2. IzzyM profile image89
        IzzyMposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        John, neither you or I know what went on here, and why the OP chooses this platform to vent her feelings of wrongdoings towards her, but one thing I did learn years ago as a young nurse is that psychiatric patients are often manipulative of others when they feel they have been hard done to in some way.

        Restoring someone to perfect mental health is sometimes impossible, and a belief in Jesus will make no difference.

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
          schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I'd hate to have a nurse like you! You seem to have no sympathy for anyone. Do you care about people or do it for power? How dare you accuse me of being manipulative? This story is true. It's possible I have an illness I agree but what I said is all true. Sure there may be more to this that I don't remember but I didn't make anything up.

          It's proven that belief in Jesus does help. What a crock and I know from experience.

          1. tussin profile image59
            tussinposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            You make several posts per day about your mental disorders.  What do you expect? After a while people will tire of hearing about all the drugs you take and all the therapy you receive and all the mental illnesses you've been diagnosed with.

            I do not mean to sound callous, but how can a bunch of strangers online really help you with any of this?  Sure, we can lend an "ear" and make encouraging cliched comments: "Sorry you're going through this!" "Hang in there!" "I'm praying for you!" But the only person who can help you is YOU.

            Have you ever heard of the boy who cried wolf?  If you keep fishing for attention, pretty soon people will stop replying to your threads because it gets OLD.  Izzy's response is very intelligent. Ultimately we are all strangers here and nobody knows for what your motivations are or why you keep posting this stuff over and over like a broken record.  You are better off finding a real human being to talk to in real life.

            1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
              schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I live alone, and when I have no  other choice but to live alone right now and when I get a panic attack like from withdrawing off a med I post. That's all. It's usually in the middle of the night or when I have no one else around. I'd much prefer to have someone in real life to talk to but unfortunately it's not always the case.

            2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
              schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              That's a lie. I don't make several posts a day, it's only once in a while when things get worse. Also, what do you care? You don't have to read them, you're treating this like a relgion and belief forum.

        2. aguasilver profile image89
          aguasilverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Hi Izzy,

          How are things in Spain?

          I bailed out and am now in SE Asia, where things are better!!

          As a young nurse, you were taught to follow protocol, which is as it should be, because the medical profession claims sovereign right over patient diagnosis and treatments applied, mostly for good solid reasons.

          But that does not guarantee that those medical protocols were correct, any more than some religious 'protocols' were correct.

          Just a few hundred years ago, medical science was ignorant of even how the human body worked, and except for surgeons who bought stolen, or freshly murdered bodies, we may still be in the dark.

          In particular the knowledge of what causes mental disturbances is still in it's infancy, so we cannot securely state that medical science knows everything.

          From a spiritual perspective, anything which cannot be accurately explained as to the cause, is classed as a possibly spiritually based disorder. i.e. Our daughter was diagnosed epileptic and put on ever more powerful chemical medicines, which almost turned her into a vegetable.

          Eventually we consulted a naturopathic doctor, one who was also a fully qualified MD and Surgeon in traditional medicine, but who turned his back on the profession and re-qualified as an ND, because (as he put it) "I wanted to start curing people, rather than just treating their symptoms".

          A combination of his natural treatments to clean the toxic heavy metal poisoning (a result of vaccinations I suspect) and some serious spiritual contemplation to find out the 'entry points' of any spiritual attack, defeated the disease that the doctors admitted to me they had no idea why she was afflicted, nor how to cure it. Her examinations, scans and all, showed no scar tissue on her brain, they had no idea WHY she was epileptic, they just followed their protocol, and did her much damage over the three years we allowed them to control her medication.

          I guess I am saying that nothing is perfect, and we need to retain a balance in these things.

          I welcome what medical science is good at, diagnosing what is/could  be the problem, and in areas where the affliction is physical, dealing with it proficiently.

          Where medical science admits it does not know the cause or cure, I back off and seek spiritual guidance as to what IS the cause, and what may be the cure. That may include prayer, deliverance, use of illegal substances (i.e. if I ever was diagnosed with cancer, I would be using alternative treatments which have been shown to deal with the problem, like THC oil, Haberpino Chilli, alkalining the body and pure prayer power to identify the root.

          Yes, some folk will manipulate, as a spiritual counsellor and ministry worker I have encountered manipulation many times, and the Holy Spirit does offer discernment, especially of alien spiritual forces (and manipulation is one of the three elements of witchcraft, the others being intimidation and deception) so we can spot these things easily.

          SGFR is known to me over these last two years, she is reaching out to a community she knows, and yes she is rightly angry to have discovered that the medications she has been enslaved to since a young girl, have NOT dealt with things, but seemingly exasperated her situation.

          There are truths evident in both protocols, medical and spiritual, we are best advised to understand that neither protocol fully understands what is required, and each is constantly learning best practise as new things are revealed.

          We no longer beat and purge epileptics in order to drive the devil from them, but equally doctors no longer put leeches and bleed people, and have accepted that clean hands is better for health.

          The one adage that MUST be adhered to is 'DO NO HARM' and in that the medical profession has much to answer for, because chemo is what kills most cancer suffers, not the disease, weakening the immune system at the very time it needs strengthening.

          In my case it also means that if I cannot say something positive, I say nothing.

      3. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I'm trying to figure out what aspergers is. I may be because I'm highly intelligent like you say. ? hmm. I believe so too! Thx John for your encouraging words!! smile xo

    3. gsidley profile image91
      gsidleyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Further evidence of just how arbitrary psychiatric diagnoses are.

      A distressed youngster - family conflict - past trauma - anger and frustration. Oh that's too difficult to make sense of. Let's just give it a label  so we don't have to think about it any more.

      1. udontnomi profile image61
        udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Did you drive or bring your lunch today?

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
          schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          roll

    4. MelissaBarrett profile image60
      MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Bi-polar disorder doesn't always or even the majority of the time cause hallucinations.  It doesn't cause drug abuse or promiscuity.  It doesn't have to include suicidal or homicidal thoughts.  It often manifests in puberty and only very rarely shows up before then.

      Like most mental illnesses it is self-protecting.  In short one of the symptoms is the denial of the condition.  You don't realize there was a problem until enough progression is made that you can compare how you were with how you feel now.  And yes mental health patients can be extremely manipulative... it's part of the self-defense mechanism of the illness...

      Bi-polar disorder is also not generally a traumatic mental illness.  In other words It wasn't acquired through a sucky childhood.  I'm not saying you didn't have a sucky childhood... I'm saying that it didn't cause bi-polar disorder.  That one is pretty much always organic.  If you had it you were born with it and it emerged during adolescence.  If anything the disorder likely had more to do with causing your sucky childhood than vice versa.

      In addition... having a mental illness sucks.  It really does.  A belief in God is peachy and probably does give strength to get through it... but it wont cure it.  Love God but take your meds.  The same advice I would give someone with a heart condition.

      If faith alone could cure mental illness there would never be another homeless schizophrenic street preacher screaming scripture on a corner.

      1. udontnomi profile image61
        udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        1. Mental illness is usually a combination of organic and environmental factors, so a "sucky childhood" (tacky, diminishes credibility) can definitely contribute. Hello? You have no basis to say the illness caused the "sucky" childhood. Imagine the various forms of severe abuse that may have exasperated and bewildered the child. I agree that denial is a symptom as illustrated here with a Psych101 description of a disorder and an errant assessment. That astute description of pi-polar should come in handy on the next multiple choice test.

        In this case, the mental health professionals were trying to figure out what to put on the paper work and how to approach the "care" of the client. By law you must be a psychiatrist to diagnose a patient with a specific mental disorder and work with a multi-disciplinary treatment team to give advice and direction. However, contrary to sound practice, psychologists, master level therapists, family counselors, school guidance counselors, social workers, and big mouth know-it-alls without a clue get in on the act.

        Be careful, there are weird manipulative types out there. No telling what motivates them.

        The description of the disorder is irrelevant at this point. There only three things to ascertain. What is her condition? What do I need to do to stabilize her and make her comfortable? Where do we go from here?

        2. An expert on faith in God, too?

        Good luck on the pop quiz.

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
          schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          You got to a point I was going to mention-
          My mother told me recently a few months- ago, that she thought I was never mentally ill but 'wanted to protect me from getting pregnant or doing things my sisters did'. the reasons she gave me were ridiculous and not true, she mixed everything up like I had gone into a bar one day out of curiousity and I tried drinking half a beer, she took apic of me with the beeer next to my bed. idk what she was up to. when I got home form the hosp as well, my savings of $1,6000 was gone.

          I did have a lot of scary thoghts as a child but not sure these were "me" or her. she told me she saw the devil- she scared us  alot.

          It's true things could have been worse if I had not gotten out of 'that house'.
          I don't know but my personality would not take any more abuse.

          Two of my sisters ran away at same age, two a little older left. None of them could tak it.



          Just a few thoguhts.

          I don't intend on getting off all my medication ether, but I'm on 3, not 5 pills now and it's great!! I might get off all of it in (time). NOt sure but I met a girl like me who was heavily medicated for ten years, not twenty, and she is a peer specialist. She looks very heatlhyy and beautiful and she is off all  her meds for 2yrs now. It can be done and shoud be in cases...but requiers good ditet and exercise etc usually. It took her two years she said to decrease it all, I"m not surprised. medication is very powerful.

          I've been taught more recently that Coping is more powerful than a pill. I personaly will never know until the day comes that I try natural methods but for now I'm not.
          I say, though, abuse can cause  an illness, my doctors tell me that. Whoever is posting otherwise does not know their stuff!! !!!

          1. udontnomi profile image61
            udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            There you go. I am encouraged by your insight and attitude. Medication works best when used as a tool. Some people respond this way to medication, "Oh, this is what it feels like to be normal."

            Now it is time to get to work. It really is hard on your body to be on prescription medicine for long periods of time. If used appropriately, there will be a lot of work put into establishing successful patterns while gradually reducing the amount of medication. It can take several years, and someone may have a setback that knocks them of balance. Heartbreak can take its toll. You have to keep in mind that it won't kill you.

            Your experiences have sent you to a place of intense introspection. It will be to your good fortune

            1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
              schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Thank you "fortune cookie" lol wink smile))

    5. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I don't have one ounce of respect for people in the 'mental illness' game. I think they're all suffering from personality disorders and 'projecting' their own illness onto others. And Lithium is deadly!

      1. udontnomi profile image61
        udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        It helped me, and I do not respect the level of your expertise. I would warn against trusting your judgement.

        May I point out that you entered the "Mental Health Game" when you charged in with your opinion. You do not understand clinical lithium. You get more heavy metal from your tuna sandwich. I mentioned the water in South West Texas. Check out the crime rate. Check out the lifespan of the population. What do you have against someone living a long, healthy life and being happy?

        If you knew what it was like to lose your mind . . . you would be overjoyed to get it back again.

        "Every good and perfect gift comes from God."

        That includes doctors and medicine.

        Now, it is time to pray for discerning of spirits. It is a gift of the Holy Spirit. You need no man(species) for a guide.

      2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        what? you are clearly not in reality as far as medical facts go! Please inform yourself, it's no game.

      3. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I'm in a mental illness game?
        Thanks a lot.

  2. SoManyPaths profile image59
    SoManyPathsposted 5 years ago

    I think a psychiatrist can diagnose any teen with something at age 16 or in their 20s, 30s....

    similar to the TV commercials promoting their latest medical pill, if you have any of these symptoms........a long laundry list then you may benefit from....

  3. udontnomi profile image61
    udontnomiposted 5 years ago

    It is not legal to diagnose a minor with a specific mental illness like schizophrenia, Manic depression, this neurosis, or that psychosis. The condition should be described as "severely emotionally disturbed", "oppositional and defiant", "bi-polar" and on. Bi-polar is a catch-all phrase for mood swings.The law does not want anyone to be stigmatized, but stigmatized you will be.

    Someone prescribed you lithium. It is an element that naturally occurs. It is mild, has nothing in the way of negative side effects and is very good for correcting a chemical imbalance. It is found in significant amounts in the drinking water in SW Texas. Now you know why the people around there are so happy go lucky.

    If you do not get depressed sometimes in this mad, mad, mad, mad, mad, world, there must be something wrong with you. I like your spunk. You are a solid writer and you have a lot to say. I want to hear it. I am not alone.

    1. gsidley profile image91
      gsidleyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Lithium is a volatile, potentially poisonous metal that can be fatal at moderately high levels - hence, anyone prescribed it for bipolar disorder will require regular blood tests to check that the level is not becoming dangerously high. No one has yet demonstrated a specific correction of a chemical imbalance; like pretty much all psycoactive drugs, any benefit seems to accrue from a global sedative effect.

      1. udontnomi profile image61
        udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Don't over-react to misinformation, especially in the case of a tender heart who is easily rattled. Pure lithium is a metal. What is prescribed for a chemical imbalance is in a molecular bond we call a salt. The internet is rife with "experts" in every field.

        On the upside . . . a well balanced diet and plenty of exercise should do the trick. Learn to play an instrument, volunteer with Habitat for Humanity, become a reading tutor at a local school, feed the homeless . . . these have been proven to alleviate depression.

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
          schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          good advice thanks

        2. gsidley profile image91
          gsidleyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Udontnomi - I agree there are too many so called "experts" on the internet, spreading misinformation. So let me correct some of your points:
          1.  Just because something occurs "naturally" does not mean it is non-toxic.  To highlight just one example, arsenic can be found naturally and it might be pushing it a bit to suggest this harmless!
          2. There is no evidence whatsoever that lithium  rectifies a chemical imbalance. Even biological psychiatrists don't claim that bipolar disorder is caused by lithium deficiency. Lithium has a general sedating effect which, of course, might be highly desirable in someone experiencing acute mania, but let's not kid ourselves that the drug has a specific rectifying effect on a chemical imbalance.
          3. As for side-effects, at low recommended therapeutic levels it commonly is associated with hand tremor and weight gain. Long term use (which is often recommended by physicians) impairs thyroid function with up to 20% of women on long term treatment requiring additional treatment with thyroid hormones. Blood levels of lithium only slightly over the target range can cause an acute toxic state initially involving extreme thirst and excessive urination closely followed, as the blood level increases, by diarrhoea, vomiting, kidney damage, nervous system damage, convulsions, coma and death.  So I think you're  "nothing in the way of side-effects"  comment is a tad off the mark.!

          1. udontnomi profile image61
            udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            You sound like a disclaimer on an Ambien advert. You better stay away from peanuts, too. Some people get sick and die from eating them. The doctors go through a process to determine if you are a good match for the medication.

            I took lithium for years. The salt was tough on my kidneys because they were damaged by a childhood fever. All it did was elevate my mood and limit my mood swings. I can take myself to the same place now . . . with the help of the Good Lord.

            Now, what did you want to educate me about?

            1. gsidley profile image91
              gsidleyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              As your post bore no relevance at all to my previous comments, I cant respond to your question. It is also quite touching how much faith you have in your doctor.

              If you find lithium helpful then I'm genuinely pleased for you. I respect the right of any person to ingest any chemical they wish to (alcohol, cannabis, tobacco or any prescribed medication) as long as it doesn't negatively impinge on anybody else. If  the recipient finds it helpful that's great. What I always will challenge are the spurious claims (e.g. "rectifying chemical imbalances", "no side effects") typical of the psychiatric profession and drug companies.

              1. udontnomi profile image61
                udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I know paranoia when I see it. There is a conpiracy behind every tree. Some side effects aren't so bad. Maybe you should burn a dubie and relax.

                1. gsidley profile image91
                  gsidleyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Nothing to do with paranoia my friend. Take a look at the research and open your mind.

                  1. udontnomi profile image61
                    udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Don't cross me. I'm a busy street.

  4. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    I know someone getting dialysis from lithium damage. "Lithium, though successful in the treatment of bipolar disorder, has also been associated with lithium induced kidney failure." So maybe you got a messed up family.
    A lot of people do. Would make anyone depressed. I don't see anything wrong with you except for that. What I did for my problems was talk to strangers where I could bare all. Found out compared to some others, I had no problems.

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It is a horrible drug. So glad I'm off it after almost 20yrs.
      yes, I def have that. no doubt many of us do.
      thank you! smile

  5. Athena Clara profile image61
    Athena Claraposted 5 years ago

    i am so sorry about what happened to you!  16 years old is a very young age... I'm 18 and I can't imagine what you've gone through. 

    I just started pre-med, and I did visit a psychiatric clinic several times for a couple months now.  It's sad how people look down on those who are psychiatric cases.  I wish you the very best of health - both mental and physical.  Stay strong!!!

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That's very kind, thank you Athena,
      I'm glad I found out , it really makes a huge difference for me to be on less medication at this point- I feel so much better- what does that tell one? -taht I was on too much or the wrong stuff. I can't say much more on that right now.
      Sometime I'll explain further. smile
      I've been going through a huge withdrawl which is almost over thank God. My doctor took me off a high dose to a small one in ten days- which I've never done before- it took several months to do it before, so I'm not surprised I had the effects I've had which included severa panick attacks.
      (You'd think the docotr would have advised an inpatient care for this but alas no. I had to, as always, take matters into my own hands and get into a temporary respite for relife. Yes it was that bad.)
      I don't have all the answers but I know that America is overmedicated- that I can say for sure.!

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        anyone who wants to know more about that can read "toxic psychiatry" or any book by Dr. peter breggin and also go to www.madinamerica.com

        or read my hub latest with more detail if you need info. thank you.

  6. Reality Bytes profile image90
    Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago

    schoolgirlforreal, since you are discussing these issues, I hope you do not take offense at me asking a question. 

    During your treatment did you ever work with a doctor that performs shadow work?  (Carl Jung)

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Just what she needs . . . another expert in the field. Now, I am in need of a primal scream.

      Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

      1. Reality Bytes profile image90
        Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        And in what way are you in a situation to determine what another individual needs?

        1. udontnomi profile image61
          udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Right back at you, Doctor Bird.

          1. Reality Bytes profile image90
            Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Do you even realize the levels of your hypocrisy?



            "You are in no position/condition to be dispensing wisdom."

            1. udontnomi profile image61
              udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Even a blind hog can find a truffle, but an eagle soars looking for carrion.

    2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      My current therapist just introduced me, we haven't done  it yet. I want to thou.

      1. Reality Bytes profile image90
        Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I would be interested in if it helps at all.  Perhaps after a few sessions, you could share your thoughts?

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
          schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          sure, when I get to it!

          1. Reality Bytes profile image90
            Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Kk,  good luck with everything.  smile  Seize the day!

            1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
              schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              thanks wink xo

          2. udontnomi profile image61
            udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I would put it off indefinitely.

    3. MelissaBarrett profile image60
      MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Biofeedback might help too.

      It helps to recognize earlier when you are entering into a cycle.

      1. udontnomi profile image61
        udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        What was that about denial? Let's keep it reality based. You are in no position/condition to be dispensing wisdom.

        1. tsmog profile image83
          tsmogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Get lost! You are of know help contradicting dialogue with your illicit advice deemed from a search there or here. One may say 'troll.' If I was still in a bipolar chat room I'd prompt the monitor to ban you. I see not offering of hope with dissertations and banter, which seems more like self-efficacy. I certainly see no listening or caring or rendering concern for another persons welfare. Go write a hub on your disagreements while adding a bit of clarity and a little substantiation for credibility. I took your bait, more from the Goddess Ate than that which you espouse. Caution. Your lamp just may dry of oil.

          tim

          1. udontnomi profile image61
            udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            In your case, I reitterate.

          2. MelissaBarrett profile image60
            MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            You realize that the only way to deal with that type is completely ignore them right?

            1. udontnomi profile image61
              udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Again with the misdiagnosis? Some people are slow learners. Eventually, they all come around. I know this from intense introspection.

  7. Reality Bytes profile image90
    Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago

    http://files.myopera.com/danieltowsey/blog/TrollSpray.jpg

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image59
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      lol

    2. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      .I came for a closer look!




      http://s4.hubimg.com/u/6498059_f1024.jpg

      I prefer original art. An original thought would die of lonliness here.

      1. Hollie Thomas profile image59
        Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Your analysis based on ....

        1. udontnomi profile image61
          udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Exactly! Ad infinitum. All of the above.

  8. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
    schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago

    What a weeping thornbush this has become!!! lol

    1. Reality Bytes profile image90
      Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTYihtAd6XiBshDTzqNqE__uvfeodO2iZd__ZShIRcIoqRBjxTX


      smile

  9. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
    schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago

    I realize it's not the best idea to share stuff sometimes.

  10. Hollie Thomas profile image59
    Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago

    We all share stuff at some point. Sometimes it's a lot easier to share with people you've never met.

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      wink thx wink smile smile))

    2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      wink thx wink smile smile))

  11. ananceleste profile image81
    anancelesteposted 5 years ago

    Hi schoolgirlforreal;

    I have two daughters (16 and 17 ) that have schizo-affective disorder( is a combination of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder). Also my husband ( of 20 years) has paranoid schizophrenia. He is compleatly disabled. Also I was an RN before I had to become their full time guardian. So, as you can see, I can relate.

    My oldest daughter, began having manic episodes at the age of 11 and full blown hallucinations by the age of 15. At the age of 13 she could jump from being acutely depressed to having a 3 day manic episode. She has been in anti-psychotic meds for years. Sixty percent of the time, they barely work.

    My 16 year old, has been hospitalized a couple of times for her depressive moods followed by rare manic peaks. She does well with meds.

    This is a LIFE LONG BATTLE, my dear. The thing that my daughters, and my husband for that matter, taught me is that faith is the best palliative to have when the world seams to crash down. Even if you have no belief system, be assured that you can get through this.

    After working with, 12 different health care professionals ( doctors, specialists, therapists, social workers etc.) Is evident, that a holistic approach is best. I know how you feel, I have seen it in my daughters' eyes almost every day. And don't worry about judgmental, misinformed people; in the end, this your life. And is your right to be happy and fulfilled.

    Get inspired, go above and beyond...live. There are sites that will help vent and interact with people that are going trough the same thing. No one will try to fix you, or call you names or even acusse you of being an attention junkie.

    Nami is an organization that advocates for people with mental illnesses. Is completely free and has different programs to educate the public. Good luck my dear. Blessings.

    http://www.nami.org/


    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6978277.jpg

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Faith has always been a huge coping skill. thanks I'll look into the site. I didn't know that it had that kind of support! big_smile blessings, sgfr
      new hub btw all about this. ty.

  12. Greekgeek profile image94
    Greekgeekposted 5 years ago

    I hate to bring this up, but the troll reminds me: it's risky to be posting this kind of thing on a public forum. The web is searchable, a permanent record of all your words.

    If I may offer a word of advice: NEVER share identifying personal information when writing under this handle? Not your name, school, where you live, or anything  that a good web sleuth could piece together to figure out who you are in real life. You don't want health insurance companies or future employers reading this stuff about your experiences -- it's not their business. Unfortunately, nowadays, companies, banks, insurance and even lawyers of people in lawsuits against you do sophisticated searches digging up all the info they can about you online.

    Have you considered joining a password-protected forum where you can share your stories with people in private, without posting it in a public place archived and accessible by search engines? I wouldn't trust facebook, but you might look for a site like Livejournal or Dreamwidth. You can lock posts to friends-only and/or always post under a pseudonym (again, be careful about sharing info that can identify who you are, where you live, etc.) On those communities, you can look for online friends who share interests -- favorite books, shows, hobbies. A support network like that might be helpful and perhaps safer than posting your personal details on a public forum.

    Not that I want to discourage you from reaching out and getting support-- I know that the web is a help for many. But I would suggest a little caution.

    1. aguasilver profile image89
      aguasilverposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Good advise.... too late for me I'm afraid! smile

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        wink

      2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        http://s3.hubimg.com/u/6911710_f248.jpg

    2. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I see this is a tough town. It reminds me of an old noir episode of "Route 66".

  13. aware profile image72
    awareposted 5 years ago

    has ?
    "Join the club" been posted yet?
    we are all a lil off .
    diagnose ?
    Seek a second and third opinion .

  14. aware profile image72
    awareposted 5 years ago

    run a mile .
    if that does not work .
    run two.
    and so on.

  15. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "It reminds me of an old noir episode of "Route 66"." Which one?

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The one where Todd and Buzz go this town where everyone  gathered in the square for a masquerade flea market.

      They drank too much and squabbled all night long.

      https://encrypted-tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRHQBOgytAOjZyLrgrMjlcooxM5ZGLPxqheCRHmMBylae8S0p0hrQ

  16. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Don't remember that one.

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That reminds me of the "Twilight Zone".

      https://encrypted-tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTjgC6m_FpcsUOEajJHd0OXgP7loJvIfwVExPX56JvfxgJZFMkS

      You are in that very episode of "Route 66" right now! Life is a trip, no?

    2. Hollie Thomas profile image59
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hey Knol,

      Have you enjoyed the games? Somewhat off topic, but topic is also a little skewed.

  17. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Actually been thinking about all afternoon. I am the first TV generation. It was character study for me and philosophy. Route 66 had some pretty good philosophy as did Twilight Zone. Characters in freaky conditions.

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Humor can bring a smile.

  18. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    I only get one channel - all I can afford. So mostly what I get so far is beach volley ball and water polo. Eeee gad. Liked the synchronized diving
    and rowing but not much of that. How about you?

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I don't like pro athletes in the games. It would be nice to see some young ametures make their break. The fellowship aspect is all but gone.

      I don't watch TV much, I am too busy.

    2. Hollie Thomas profile image59
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Really enjoyed gymnastics (loved team US) and also the swimming (loved team US again) other than that not been that into it. Rowing, Eaton, not my thang.

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Been watching them, they're great! big_smile love the beach volleyball, diving, gymnastics, all of it! big_smile

  19. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    The corporations take over everything.

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Remember the John Birch society? They don't seem so looney now, do they?

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I remember them, don't remember much, was little then. My sister took me. blah.

    2. Hollie Thomas profile image59
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Indeed they do. It's funny, my mum (she's 83) was just saying today that the Olympics used to be for amateurs, I remember you saying that a couple of weeks ago.

  20. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    No - just plain rowing. The aesthetics.

  21. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Don't think corporations are much like communists.

    1. udontnomi profile image61
      udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I do not want to digress too far. How about something to lift the spirit.

      https://encrypted-tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTBlk-eu7I9TnHlTKhVshdLDNh4txnVMlgSL3nOs-fPoOs5bj_RKw

      http://youtu.be/cLocKzC80gk

  22. WryLilt profile image89
    WryLiltposted 5 years ago

    I agree with IzzyM. Am currently dealing with a manipulative bipolar mother who is delusional.

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image59
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I can see where Izzy is coming from, and I'm not taking a swipe at anyone here. But, if you are ill and perceiving things in a particular way, you are bound to behave in a particular way.

      1. udontnomi profile image61
        udontnomiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If you think a certain way, you are apt to act in a certain way. If you behave a particular way, you are bound to think in a particular way. If you say unusual things, they may or may not have value, meaning, pertinence, relevance, or be able to compress thoughts to the point where they are concentrated enough to digest. It is no help at all.

        1. Hollie Thomas profile image59
          Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          It's a good job you were not the one asking for help and  that my comment was not directed at you then.

    2. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      That's too bad Wry,,,,,,,I have the same sort of but what can you do? Not everyone fits the same mold you know. hmm anyways, I'm not going to argue with you. If you have your hurts you have your hurts. But as for me i've never hurt anyone or myself thank you very much!! smile))

    3. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      that's your own baggage wry that you have no right to project onto innocent others. I deal with a untreated schzophrenic mother but I don't go around bashing all people who are schzophrenic.
      Save the complaints for your therapist.

  23. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    You probably need a psychiatrist if you take these mothers seriously.

  24. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Two of my ex's had psychopaths for mothers, although the culturally exceptionable types. Anyway dinner time and thank you.

  25. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
    schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago

    I posted this forum when i was really confused.

    thanks for all who lent their support.

    read my new hub (if you want the low down)
    thx and goodbye -to this thread!!!


    smile

  26. peeples profile image89
    peeplesposted 5 years ago

    I'm late to the show but I wanted to add a little here. I was diagnosed bipolar as a teen. My oldest son is 8 and has aspergers. I origionally thought he was going to be bipolar as well. After much research and several therapist we received a proper diagnosis for him. However I learned in the process that it is very hard to tell bipolar apart from aspergers. Both generally have higher IQ's, meltdowns, and a feeling of being lost, but people with aspergers have trouble understanding other people's emotions usually. It is a big sign as a child. It shows as a lack of empathy, but that is not the case. Also those with Aspergers tend to have meltdowns for hours and then seem perfectly fine. As a child aspergers shows as a giant 3 hour temper tantrum. My personal opinion though is that you need to look at taking no medication and trying to build your self help skills. I don't post on your threads often but you seem to be a good person with a glitch. I hope you get that glitch worked out so that you can feel good in life. I am glad you are feeling better! My life was no peach either and I certainly understand needing to vent at times!

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      thanks, I'll keep it in mind smile

    2. Six G Eddie profile image59
      Six G Eddieposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I know you ladies have head trips, but I can help you along. Your troubles are over.

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
        schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        thinking positive = big_smile

        1. Six G Eddie profile image59
          Six G Eddieposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Things are looking up sweetheart, Eddie's got your back. I always take care of school girls.

          1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
            schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            roll

  27. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
    schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago

    By the way, I posted this in health.

    This is not like a religion and debate forum,
    it's used for discussing health issues and getting to the bottom of them.

    For anyone who was negative or condescending, you don't belong in this thread to begin with.

    I won't make the mistake of posting about this again.

  28. krisnicole1987 profile image61
    krisnicole1987posted 5 years ago

    Schoolgirl,
                 It is sad to see the amount of people on here that think they know just what bi-polar is and isn't. As for the nurses who say this or that is possible or not.. remember they are just nurses. I was diagnosed bi-polar when I was 13, and I'm 25 now. It is possible to live a normal healthy life but the cold hard truth about it is that more often than not it is only an option through proper cooperation with your doctors when it comes to taking medication, and your counsler when it comes to talking about your day to day life, your past experiences, and how you're feeling now. Might I also suggest reading up on Sigmund Freud and his early partners in research, when it comes to matters like these there is no substitue for educating yourself, not only do to regain some since of control in your own life but it also makes communication with professionals much much easier. The most harmful thing you can do to your state of mind is trust the opinion and ridicule of those with out a license or diploma in this area. In short my friend keep your head up, don't be afraid to go after the things you want in life but be willing to accept that you may have to work what seems a little bit harder than others due to the extra emotions.
    And always know that anything worth having if often difficult to come by. I wish you the best of luck!

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image73
      schoolgirlforrealposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks very  much. You're right about dealing with more emotion than most.

 
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