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jump to last post 1-13 of 13 discussions (51 posts)

Best Non-Animal Protein Source

  1. vespawoolf profile image97
    vespawoolfposted 6 years ago

    What is the best source of non-animal protein I can add to my diet, not including supplements like protein powder?

    1. Eliminate Cancer profile image59
      Eliminate Cancerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      If you eat a variety of vegetables, grains, and legumes, you probably don't have to worry about getting enough protein.  Your body makes what it needs, and the quality of that protein is superior to animal proteins.

      1. vespawoolf profile image97
        vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Thank you for your feedback. We do eat a lot of quinoa. I suppose that would qualify!

        1. rmcrayne profile image96
          rmcrayneposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Quinoa, millet, amaranth and buckwheat are all high in protein.  I put in some recipe links in one of my Body Ecology hubs. You can find plenty of recipes on sites like allrecipes.

          1. vespawoolf profile image97
            vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks, I'll take a peek at your Body Ecology hubs. Amaranth and quinoa are both common in the Andes, although I tend to use quinoa more often.

          2. vespawoolf profile image97
            vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Could you please direct me to your Body Ecology hub?

            1. rmcrayne profile image96
              rmcrayneposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              HP has really cracked down on posting links, even when related, and considers it self promotion.  Even alluding to hubs has supposedly gotten a hubber banned from the forums. Go to my profile, and "search contact by rmcrayne".

    2. BlissfulWriter profile image74
      BlissfulWriterposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      If you consider eggs non-animal, then it would be your best protein source.  In fact, I believe eggs to be a better protein source than meat.

      However, if you want to avoid animal products (of which eggs are), then beans is a great protein source.

  2. mega1 profile image78
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    I think I mentioned somewhere here that I've been sprouting beans and they are a wonderful source of protein, plus they just taste so refreshing.  Uses: salads, stir fries, ground up in bread, as a simple snack, marinated in lots of dishes but especially tossed with other veggies and slightly steamed.  It takes some time and attention to do it without them turning sour, but it is well worth it.  And did I mention how inexpensive they are when you sprout them yourself?

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That's something I haven't considered for a long time. I used to own a sprouter, a special jar with a top for easy draining. I'm sure I could rig someting up on my own, though. I'll look into it! Sprouts are delicious, to boot.

  3. Anti-Valentine profile image95
    Anti-Valentineposted 6 years ago

    Peanuts. Peanut butter is said to be one of the things recommended for those who can't eat meat, but need protein - which everyone needs.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      And peanut butter is delicious! Good suggestion, and easy to keep on hand for whenever hunger strikes.

      1. jimmylesaint profile image60
        jimmylesaintposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Peanut butter and aflatoxin???

        1. vespawoolf profile image97
          vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Thank you, jimmylesaint. I make homemade peanut butter on a weekly basis, but haven't tried aflatoxin.

  4. Diane Inside profile image79
    Diane Insideposted 6 years ago

    I was a very small skinny child and my mom was conscerned because I didn't eat much especially meat.

    The doctor says, of course, Peanut Butter.

    I of course ate lots of peanut butter as a kid.

    So yes that is a good suggestion.

    I'd also say,
    cheese,
    beans,
    nuts of almost any kind,

    and eggs.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I suppose any kind of nut butter woudl work: almond butter, cashew butter, etc.

  5. fitmom profile image81
    fitmomposted 6 years ago

    I don't know if you do dairy or not, but cottage cheese is a great source of protein and is delicious paired with some fruit. Black-eyed peas also have high protein content. I make Ezekiel bread, which has beans and grain and counts as a complete protein. It is delicious! The Ezekiel bread that you can buy in the store is like cardboard though.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The Ezekiel bread gets my attention. Do you have a recipe for it? I'd definitely be interested.

      1. fitmom profile image81
        fitmomposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Hi! I'm thinking it would be a great subject for a hub. I'm putting the finishing touches on my first one. I'll have to do that topic next.  smile

        1. vespawoolf profile image97
          vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Okay. I'll keep an eye on your hubs. Thanks!

  6. rmcrayne profile image96
    rmcrayneposted 6 years ago

    Here are some suggestions here: 

    http://hubpages.com/forum/post/1979564

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, rmcrayne. looks good!

  7. savanahl profile image70
    savanahlposted 6 years ago

    I've heard that soy and whey proteins are excellent sources.

  8. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    For complete protein, a bean plus a grain.

    1. profile image58
      Robertr04posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Chlorella has more protein than beef and more calcium than milk. packed with vit.A, B1-B12, E, folic acid, iron, magnesium, potassium,selenium, amino acids and cardio systems. It tones and detoxifies the immune system, liver,kidneys, blood,digestive system and more. Removes chemical toxins from the body, including chemo therapy. Curbs the appetite, useful in weight loss. If that's not enough, try Spirulina.High quality protein content, high vegetable iron amd magnesium content ,the unsaturated, essential fatty acids, a rich source of chlorophyll, and an abundant supply of growth elements for new cellular life RNA and DNA as well as a reliable vegetable source of vit. A,B1,B2,Niacin, and B12 makes this a very valuable plant to properly nourish ourselves. It also protects against radiation and helps us rid ourselves of it. Both are water plants known as algae best taken in a herbal extracts.

      1. vespawoolf profile image97
        vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Wow, these are very interesting suggestions. Thank you. I'll have to find out if they are available here. If not, I could feasibly import them someday.

        1. profile image58
          Robertr04posted 6 years agoin reply to this

          I have written a hub you may find interesting with more info on these herbs.Try robertr04.hub

          1. vespawoolf profile image97
            vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Great hub! Thank you!

  9. mistyhorizon2003 profile image93
    mistyhorizon2003posted 6 years ago

    Nuts and cheese smile

    1. profile image58
      Robertr04posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Dairy products, you have got to be joking? Cheese is from an animal source.

      1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image93
        mistyhorizon2003posted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Sorry, I assumed 'non-animal' source meant 'not meat' as in 'vegetarian', and cheese can be made suitable for vegetarians if rennet is not used.

    2. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      mistyhorizon2003, nuts are a great idea. I do eat plenty of almonds and almond milk.

  10. Jon Green profile image90
    Jon Greenposted 6 years ago

    Tofu is great - though it's better when it's freshly made. As a veggie, I would be lost without it! It doesn't taste of much, but with soy sauce it's terrific. You can just stir-fry it with noodles and veg for a great quick meal - under 5mins.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Good suggestion. I used to eat it all the time, but it's not available in my neck of the woods. Maybe I'll have to learn to make it!

      1. Jon Green profile image90
        Jon Greenposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        There you go - a business opportunity! Making tofu as a cottage industry.

        1. vespawoolf profile image97
          vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Great idea. Thanks!

    2. the girls profile image81
      the girlsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Tofu is my best protein substitute - tofu soup, fried tofu, steamed tofu , baked tofu and many more.

      1. vespawoolf profile image97
        vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        We used to put tofu in smoothies as well!

        1. profile image58
          Robertr04posted 6 years agoin reply to this

          It's not about the rennet, it's about what the animal was fed. Organic dairies are not allowed to feed their cows with gains grown with pesticides. They can't use antibiotics or growth hormones. The thought behind not using animal or animal products is based on those facts, I don't eat meat because it is extremely difficult to find truly clean meat, plus the digestion and acid problems .

          1. vespawoolf profile image97
            vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            I'm not a vegetarian, but would like to increase protein intake without relying on animal products. I do agree that there's a big difference between organic and non-organic dairy.

        2. the girls profile image81
          the girlsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          .I hope tofu smoothie tastes good :-)

          1. vespawoolf profile image97
            vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Since tofu is mild-flavored, it mostly thickens the smoothie and adds protein.

  11. RTalloni profile image86
    RTalloniposted 6 years ago

    Garbanzo beans, aka chickpeas, humus, ceci, Egyptian pea, gram kichererbse, and revithia, are high in protein and they can be used in a surprisingly wide variety of recipes.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      We love hummus...I'm not familiar with the last two listed. I'll have to look into it. Thank you! you should write a hub...

  12. Journey * profile image87
    Journey *posted 6 years ago

    Hi vespawoolf, like RTalloni, I would most recommend chick peas / garbanzo beans for a non-animal protein source.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Great idea! I made pita and hummus just yesterday. I guess that would qualify. :   )

  13. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
    Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years ago

    Spirulina has the highest natural content of protein in the plant world.  It is about 65% to 71% protein. Another great source is hemp, which also contains omega 3-6-9 and branch chain amino acids. Granted it is a powder, but you can't get a better source of protein and since it doesn't need to be cooked, when you consume it, you get ALL of the protein. When you cook veggies and meat, the majority of the proteins are destroyed.

    A great book you may want to look into is Superfoods by David Wolfe. He describes the top 10 superfoods, plus some honorable mentions. It's an excellent read.

    1. vespawoolf profile image97
      vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This is great information. I'll look for that book on Amazon. I'm not sure if hemp or spirulina is available in Peru, but I'll look into it. Since it's a coastal country I'm sure at least the spirulina can be found. Thank you!

      1. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
        Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        You're quite welcome. I'm sure you can order it online if you can't find it in Peru, although I'll warn you it is a bit pricey. Hemp you can get from Nutiva. Their hemp and all other products are grown 100% organically and it's not as pricey as spirulina. It contains slightly less protein, but is just as easily abosrbed.

        Wolfe has information on ordering spirulina and other superfoods on his personal website, davidwolfe.com. big_smile

      2. profile image58
        Robertr04posted 6 years agoin reply to this

        While you are out getting books, try Taking Every Bite Seriously by LaKeta McCauley.

        1. vespawoolf profile image97
          vespawoolfposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Great, thanks for the advice Robertr04!

 
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