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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (7 posts)

Why do cats so love to play under and in the Christmas tree?

  1. Phyllis Doyle profile image96
    Phyllis Doyleposted 3 years ago

    Why do cats so love to play under and in the Christmas tree?

    I do not have a cat now, but once I had two cats (brothers) and they loved to play hide and seek in the Christmas tree. Funny they never knocked down the tree or broke anything. Do you have cats that play in the Christmas tree?

  2. Marie Flint profile image91
    Marie Flintposted 3 years ago

    I don't own a cat, nor have I ever had that problem. I saw a documentary once that might give some insight into this behavior, though. Cats are kind of territorial and need different levels of height to "hang out." The program was about a man who was having trouble with his cat, as it was not adjusting well to its new environment. To put it bluntly, the cat was very feisty and, at times, nervous. An expert pet counselor was called and ledges along the wall were recommended to be installed so the cat could climb or jump up onto the extension and rest there. It worked. The owner had no trouble with the cat afterwards. So, hey, the Christmas tree branches offer climbing opportunities and a place where the cat can get a different perspective on its space. Understanding the cat's instincts makes climbing Christmas trees quite understandable. The tree trunk is probably a great scratching pole, too!

    Merry Christmas!

  3. askformore lm profile image67
    askformore lmposted 3 years ago

    Yes, our cat plays under the Christmas tree!
    We always buy him a small gift, so the kids are convinced that the cat (Morgan) is cheating, trying to find his parcel. ... (We don't tell the children that the cat most likely would hide and play in the tree even without a rewarding Christmas parcel)

  4. ChristinS profile image96
    ChristinSposted 3 years ago

    Cats are instinctive climbers and they are also very drawn to things that crinkle and make noise - most tree branches do that.  It triggers their hunting instincts (which is what they are doing when they play - they are "hunting" and "killing" their prey be it a toy or their sibling cats lol)

    In nature cats climb trees to escape danger as well.  I don't keep my tree anywhere near our cats because it's a constant struggle to keep them out of it.

  5. The Examiner-1 profile image74
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    Probably because they are drawn to the lights, glitter and warmth not to mention being 'awed' by their reflections in the shiny balls. They also like to play with the dangling things, climb the trees and hide between the presents, also try to find out what is under the paper. Cats are very curious 'searchers', and curious to their owners.

  6. Genna East profile image89
    Genna Eastposted 3 years ago

    Yes, Phyllis, and she loooves the tree.  She often sleeps under it. :-)

  7. MizBejabbers profile image93
    MizBejabbersposted 3 years ago

    We don't put up a tree for just the two of us anymore, but when we did and in my previous lifetime, our cats have always wanted to explore the tree. Cats are natural tree climbers, so of course they want to climb the tree. Good thing we didn't have a "Christmas fire plug" because we had a dog, too. Anyway, when the kids were small, we had a green artificial pine tree the kids dubbed "the green commode brush". Each branch had to be inserted individually (what a pain!), and after a couple of years we had to replace the tree because the weight of the cat on those branches completely stretched out the holes and the branches would fall out.
    Cats love the tinsel and the movement of the ornaments on the tree, especially if they are shiny. Christmas bows on packages are as tempting as shoelaces, and angels are to exercise their little sharp teeth on. Just be sure they aren't plugged in or your kitten may get a shocking experience.

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