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jump to last post 1-15 of 15 discussions (48 posts)

Dork - What does that term mean to you? Are you a dork?

  1. Sally's Trove profile image81
    Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago

    When someone called me a dork today, I did a search on what the term means. I was surprised at the results here:

    derogatory. A dull, slow-witted, or socially inept person. vulgar. The pen*s.

    Someone who has odd interests, and is often silly at times. A dork is also someone who can be themselves and not care what anyone thinks.

    Slang. a silly, out-of-touch person who tends to look odd or behave ridiculously around others; a social misfit: If you make me wear that, I'll look like a total dork!

    Slang A stupid, inept, or foolish person: "the stupid antics of America's favorite teen-age cartoon dorks" (Joshua Mooney). 2. Vulgar Slang The pen*s.

    Dork is a slang word for a stupid or inept person; similar to nerd or geek. Dork may also refer to: Vulgar slang for "pen*s"

    A person of indeterminate intelligence that often gravitates toward technological or fictional material with considerable interest, but often little understanding or comprehension.

    Dork can mean a lot of things. What do you think?

    1. AliciaC profile image100
      AliciaCposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I’ve heard the word used in a friendly, joking way (especially amongst socializing teenagers), who say something like “You dork” when they’re commenting on a friend’s behavior that they consider weird or silly. The term isn’t being used in an offensive way and the speakers and the person performing the behavior are often smiling or laughing. I’ve also heard of the word being used to refer to someone with odd interests who doesn’t care what other people think about them. I’ve never thought of it as a derogatory term.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image93
        paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I have to agree. Context means everything here.

      2. Sally's Trove profile image81
        Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Thank you so much for your insights. Where "dork" might have been completely pejorative in the past, it may now have a different connotation. That's what I was looking for...a change from then to now.

        1. paradigmsearch profile image93
          paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Maybe the dork days have ended...

          1. Sally's Trove profile image81
            Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            I don't think so...but I do think what it means depends on who says it for what reason. Plus, language changes. I guess I'm feeling a bit relieved that my being called a dork wasn't such a horrible thing, considering context and all that.

    2. Jo_Goldsmith11 profile image60
      Jo_Goldsmith11posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I felt like a dork
      When I dropped my fork
      duh!
      It fell from my hands
      I sat there staring
      Not really caring
      The soup was cold
      "You are such a dork"
      This is what I was told.

      hahahahahaha smile

    3. kenneth avery profile image84
      kenneth averyposted 22 months agoin reply to this

      I've been called this derogatory term, dork, by a family member, but she was jesting. But I have also heard dork used in an ugly, mean way that caused a lot of hurt feelings.
      Our tongue can either build up or tear down is the lesson here.

    4. profile image0
      GalaxyRatposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      What?? A PE***? You gotta be kidding. But, I consider myself a dork. Yeah, it's true. I have unusual interests...

  2. knolyourself profile image59
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    Dork Matter and the Big Slang.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image81
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      What is the Big Slang?

      1. paradigmsearch profile image93
        paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        It is where dork matter came from...

        1. Sally's Trove profile image81
          Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          That's helpful. smile

  3. Zelkiiro profile image94
    Zelkiiroposted 5 years ago

    Whale junk.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image81
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I don't think that's what I was looking for.

    2. profile image0
      Beth37posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      lol

  4. paradigmsearch profile image93
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    If you were called that on this forum, the person who did it would be automatically banned for doing so. That should answer your question. big_smile

    As for me, I've done dorkness. But generally and hopefully, I am dork free.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image81
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No, no one in this forum...just looking for what folks think a dork is. But, from what you said, "dork" is a totally negative term.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image93
        paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Being called a dork is an insult. Plain and simple. You need to evaluate or reevaluate your relationship with the person who called you that.

        1. Sally's Trove profile image81
          Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          What about the second definition...Maybe "dork" is taking on a new meaning?

          1. paradigmsearch profile image93
            paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            There is such a thing as a friendly insult.

            How close is your relationship with this person?

            1. Sally's Trove profile image81
              Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              I like that.

  5. Sally's Trove profile image81
    Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago

    So far, these are totally negative connotations.

  6. Sally's Trove profile image81
    Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago

    What I'm looking for is what "dork" means to you (meaning anyone), and maybe that word has a connotation that isn't negative today, although it might have always been in the past.

    When I researched the term, I was surprised to see pen*s come up so often.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image93
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It did what...?

      1. Sally's Trove profile image81
        Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Well, maybe it could have, maybe it would have, maybe it did, and maybe it didn't. But the word did come up...can't post it here...HP would slap me and Google would condemn me. Sad, sad.

    2. profile image0
      Motown2Chitownposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Me too!  I've never heard the pen*s connotation myself.  I call myself a dork regularly.  I use it to mean silly, odd, a little less than intelligent - but endearing.  For example, I would NEVER use the word with someone who IS less than intelligent for fear of hurting their feelings.  But, I'll use it on myself or my husband - neither of us finds it offensive.

      But...then I have always had a bit of a sarcastic nature.  When I found that the root of the word sarcasm meant 'to tear the flesh,' I made a conscious attempt to avoid sarcasm as often as possible.  I may do the same with the word 'dork.'

      Interesting.

      1. Sally's Trove profile image81
        Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I, also, lean toward sarcasm. I just may rethink my approach. lol

  7. Lisa HW profile image70
    Lisa HWposted 5 years ago

    I'd say that a dork is kind of a geek who crossed the line from cool geekness to uncool dorkness.  (I know, definitions aren't supposed to include the term-in-question).

  8. Uninvited Writer profile image84
    Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago

    To me, a dork is not a totally pejorative term. To me it's a person who is socially inept, like myself at times smile

    1. paradigmsearch profile image93
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      We have a slackers club. Maybe we should start a dorkmeyer club. big_smile

  9. Sherry Hewins profile image96
    Sherry Hewinsposted 5 years ago

    The way I usually hear the word used is one friend says to another "You're such a dork." Usually after the person made a silly assumption or is behaving in a goofy manner. I generally do not take it to be their true opinion that that person is generally stupid or dull-witted. I really have not heard it used as a serious insult or put-down.

  10. Sally's Trove profile image81
    Sally's Troveposted 5 years ago

    Thanks to all of you for your very interesting input. I find myself in intriguing company!

    1. profile image0
      Motown2Chitownposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Those of us who populate the forums here at HubPages are nothing, if not intriguing!

      big_smile

  11. prettydarkhorse profile image65
    prettydarkhorseposted 5 years ago

    Somebody said I am a dork, and I asked why, she just said "You're weird". She is a friend though and she said the word with her signature laugh.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image93
      paradigmsearchposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've come to realize that being accused of dorkdom may actually be a compliment at times. lol

      1. PoeticVine profile image67
        PoeticVineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I'll agree I'm odd and can be a bit awkward at times.  It's just part of my charm.  ^_^  I too think it can sometimes be a compliment. 

        Here's another spin on it, too.  Dad has a rather interesting sense of humor -- from our childhood, my sister and I would receive periodic notes in random places saying "YOU DORK" (my father writes in a "capitals" style handwriting).  I got one about a month ago, actually -- after he patched a jacket of mine, I opened one of the pockets and found a Post-It bearing those very words, so I kept it in there.  When I reach in that pocket without thinking and feel it there, I think of Dad.   smile

        1. profile image0
          Beth37posted 5 years agoin reply to this

          That's so sweet.

          1. PoeticVine profile image67
            PoeticVineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            I've always thought so too, Beth.  ^_^   There are all kinds of ways to express affection.  That's just one of Dad's.  smile

        2. Sally's Trove profile image81
          Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          I love this little story. Thank you so much for sharing.

  12. profile image0
    Beth37posted 5 years ago

    I just want to know if you edited penis or if the admin. did.

    1. Sally's Trove profile image81
      Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I did. smile

      1. profile image0
        Beth37posted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Someone was once reading me a list of funny business web address's that went wrong.
        One was an online pen company. Their name was Pen Island. You can imagine how many hits they got.

        1. Sally's Trove profile image81
          Sally's Troveposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Why didn't I think of that!!!!!!!!!!!! Awesome. So long as you weren't looking for AdSense dollars. LOL

        2. Robert Levine profile image87
          Robert Levineposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          Along similar lines, consider what is created in the web address for Tutors Exchange when the space between those two words is eliminated.

  13. psycheskinner profile image83
    psycheskinnerposted 21 months ago

    Um, dork is not a serious insult.  It's the sort of thing tens call their friends when they think they are being a bit embarrassing.

  14. Robert Levine profile image87
    Robert Levineposted 16 months ago

    The use of "dork" to mean pen*s is because "dork," in that sense, evolved from "dirk"--a dagger, used metaphorically for the male organ.

  15. Mackenzie Skelton profile image81
    Mackenzie Skeltonposted 6 months ago

    I think that Dork can be used in many ways. I never use the word in a hurtful tone, but I call my boyfriend a dork all the time. He is! but I wouldnt change him for a second. He wouldn't be himself without his dorkiness. I think its cute on him.

 
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