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Cases like this is why we need the death penalty.

  1. ledefensetech profile image72
    ledefensetechposted 8 years ago

    What the hell is going on these days?

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091026/ap_ … BsZWFkc2c-

    1. rebekahELLE profile image90
      rebekahELLEposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I cannot even read that stuff, it is not human.

    2. jiberish profile image72
      jiberishposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I'm sorry this turned my stomach.  I believe in the death penalty for this woman.

  2. Jeffrey Neal profile image78
    Jeffrey Nealposted 8 years ago

    Good grief!  What a despicable thing to do...to treat a human being that way.

  3. Flightkeeper profile image74
    Flightkeeperposted 8 years ago

    I wouldn't mind having her treated in jail by the inmates the same way she treated that poor woman.  It's despicable and 41 years in jail isn't long enough.

  4. Newsclipper profile image79
    Newsclipperposted 8 years ago

    Wow, it's just crazy to read what some people are capable of.

  5. Pr0metheus profile image59
    Pr0metheusposted 8 years ago

    Agreed.

  6. elayne001 profile image58
    elayne001posted 8 years ago

    Makes you wonder what happened in her life to make her so cruel and prejudice towards people with limitations.

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yes I wonder what she sees in herself that she projected on to her victim?

    2. ledefensetech profile image72
      ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      No it doesn't.  All you need to know about her is her actions.  She tortured someone with the mind of a child.  I've worked with that population before, many of whom had been abused.  I'm one of the last people to be calling to use the death penalty, I'm not too confident of our ability to prove many capital crimes, but this lady's actions are beyond the pale.  Sometimes the crime is so horrific, so inhuman that we have no other choice but to end that person.  This is one of those cases.

  7. profile image43
    J de Gposted 8 years ago

    I don't believe in the death penalty.  Murder is wrong, whether by an individual or by a government it doesn't matter.

    And throwing her in jail forever is not the answer either.  The only way this woman can learn some compassion for others is if we show some compassion to her.

    Justice should not be about vengeance, it should be about rehabilitation.

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you. Most people incarcerated are mentally ill and need help. Most abusers were abused, more abuse does nothing to help them recover.

    2. James Agbogun profile image59
      James Agbogunposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      What?

    3. Lisa HW profile image79
      Lisa HWposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      A freak like this individual cannot be rehabilitated.  She's too far gone.  At this point it isn't about teaching her compassion.  The reason criminals can victimize is that they lack empathy, and if some hasn't developed that in the first few years of life when their brain was developing it isn't going to happen.  I'm sorry if this piece-of-filth has been so damaged she's now pure evil; but she lost any right to compassion from others when she did what she did to an absolutely innocent victim.

      I'm not particularly a fan of the death penalty; and it won't bring back the victim (or spare her from the torture she suffered); but her family may need to see some justice, and at this point I think giving them some sense of justice is the least the justice system can do.  It won't take away what they must live with, but it may at least prevent them from a lifetime of even more hard-to-live-with "issues" that come when there's no justice.

      I know this isn't going to happen (and I suppose I don't wouldn't really want a government that allowed it to); but there's a part of me that says, "Give the victim's family a baseball bat, a cigarette lighter, a couple of rocks, a steak knife, and monkey wrench - and have at her."

    4. profile image0
      sneakorocksolidposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      You might want to take another look.

    5. profile image0
      cosetteposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      compassion?

      for a sick twisted nasty freakshow like that?!

      I hope that woman experiences the same treatment in prison. if I ran into her i would probably bitch-slap her if I could get away with it.

      errr......... yikes <-- mad face

    6. profile image0
      zampanoposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I think it would be very hard not to agree with you.
      And I think the main reason the state does not share your point of view is linked with justice budget.

    7. spease profile image80
      speaseposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Not all people can be rehabilitated.  She should be put away forever.  It is not vengeance, it is protecting innocent people.

  8. dejajolie profile image56
    dejajolieposted 8 years ago

    Wow! This is sad I am not sure what the correct punishment, or lesson is my heart just Hurts!

  9. Valerie F profile image61
    Valerie Fposted 8 years ago

    I generally agree with rehabilitation as opposed to retribution, but I also believe that the time she does should be proportionate to the crime, and that given the scope of the crime, the length of time she devoted to abusing this woman and exploiting her for the social security check, the example she set for her son who also took part in this crime, we should consider the very real possibility that she may never be rehabilitated and therefore should spend the rest of her life in prison.

  10. torimari profile image70
    torimariposted 8 years ago

    I just feel certain people are not worth rehabilitating...than again capital punishment is so expensive. Either way it is--just kill her quickly and be done with it.

    1. ScarletRyan1970 profile image57
      ScarletRyan1970posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      You Guys in the United Stastes of America need all your killers to be EXORCIZED! Same here where i live ,they are all possed by such an evil force.EXORCIZED,EXCORIZED,EXCORIZED.And then put into rehab for life.

      Scarlet.

  11. Valerie F profile image61
    Valerie Fposted 8 years ago

    But see, if we kill her because we deem her "not worth rehabilitating," that may make us no better than she is. She believed her victim was less worthy, too.

    1. torimari profile image70
      torimariposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      By jailing her we are saying she is less worthy to live in a normal society...actually...she made herself less worthy to live.

      Sure, rehab is fine, but I just don't think all human lives that are so distorted are worth wasting time und money on...but, maybe its not worth funding her on death row either. Let her fester in a prison for life or toss her in a male prison are ok I guess. tongue

      1. Valerie F profile image61
        Valerie Fposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        No, by jailing her, we acknowledge that she has proven herself a threat to innocent members of the general population. Keeping her in jail isn't a declaration of her worth, but a measure to protect other people from actions she's proven herself willing to take.

        And she thought her victims' lives were less worthy. In order for there to be any chance of rehabilitation, we have to prove we're better than that.

        Perhaps by her actions she's forfeited her right to live. But by that logic, if you judge another person as worth less, you forfeit your right to be treated as an equal. That's where mercy comes in.

        1. torimari profile image70
          torimariposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Let's just say we don't have the same values. ;D Values are personal perspective and intangible concepts. Many people would disagree with you (and possibly me) and be fine with whoever kills her and feel the person who killed her are perhaps of no less value...or more valuable for her death because of what she did. Some would see the person who put her to death just as bad as her.
          Values are relative and individual so let's just I don't see it the way you do. smile

        2. LiamBean profile image89
          LiamBeanposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Exactly. Yes, in some cases it's punishment, but in this case I think jail would be a way to keep her from the rest of the population.



          Maybe when she's seventy and too old to wield a toilet plunger handle or aim any kind of gun.



          Certainly!

    2. Lisa HW profile image79
      Lisa HWposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I'd disagree, though.  The difference is that her victim did nothing to deserve being "deemed not worthy of living".  This piece of filth did plenty to "earn" such "deeming".  As I said before, I'm not particularly a fan of the death penalty, but there's a big difference between "deeming" innocent people "not worthy" and the goverment's saying, "If you harm and torture fellow citizens we're going to deem you unfit to live."  Attempting to rehabilitate is what society does for someone like teenage car thieves.  There's no rehabilitating of someone this demented and evil.  Besides, she lost her right to compassion when she demonstrated how absolutely without conscience and humanity she is.

  12. VENUGOPAL SIVAGNA profile image59
    VENUGOPAL SIVAGNAposted 8 years ago

    Death sentence is a must. Those who have committed heinous crimes like murder, robbery, treason, etc., whose existence threatens public safety should not be shown any mercy. They deserve no mercy. Sometimes mercy proves to be a licence for continuing the crimes.

    One group has killed atleast 4000 people by destroying the twin towers (Sept.11). That group is headed by an elusive person. Does he deserve any sympathy? Is his existence justified? Will he stop his crimes if pardoned?

  13. Lisa HW profile image79
    Lisa HWposted 8 years ago

    She's also obviously a threat to other prisoners; so she ought to be thrown in some tiny pit somewhere and have her dinner pushed under the door until she completely loses touch with reality.  That'll put her out the mental misery she's clearly in now.

  14. habee profile image95
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    I don't support the death penalty, but I don't believe everyone can be rehabilitated, either. Sentence her to hard labor for the rest of her life.

    1. livelonger profile image94
      livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I'm with you on this. Why kill her when she can probably turn out a few hundred thousand license plates for Missouri? Let her ruminate on the disgusting things she did to an innocent person for the rest of her miserable life.

      1. ledefensetech profile image72
        ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        You obviously don't have much experience with diseased minds, do you?  This lady won't spend her time ruminating in jail about her deeds, she'll spend her time justifying what she did and shifting the blame to the victim.

        Why should we pay to keep some sub-human trash like that alive?  Execute her and be done with it.

        1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
          Ron Montgomeryposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Moral considerations aside, it costs much more to execute than to incarcerate for life.

          1. livelonger profile image94
            livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Exactly. And LDT is forgetting all those license plates she could be making.

            Whether she actually comes to terms with the enormity of her crimes or not is besides the point.

            1. ledefensetech profile image72
              ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Changing your story now?  Your original argument for letting her live was so she could suffer by being forced to contemplate the enormity of her crime.  Now it doesn't matter?  Moral relativism is a messed up way at looking at things.

              1. livelonger profile image94
                livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                I'm not being morally relativistic. I was simply saying if the concern of some people was for rehabilitation, then she would have plenty of time to work through her "issues" while stamping out thousands upon thousands of license plates in jail.

                I don't support the death penalty, but I don't want people like her enjoying the freedom she forfeited. And I'd personally prefer her to be economically productive. Maybe the proceeds of her work can be used to take care of the victim's child.

                1. ledefensetech profile image72
                  ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  Neither do I necessarily support the death penalty.  I'm a big advocate of the Innocence Project. http://www.innocenceproject.org/

                  But the details of a case like this are so heinous that I'm willing to forgo my distaste of state sanctioned capital punishment because if anyone ever deserved it, this lady does.  Her actions make her a sociopath.  There is no rehabilitation or remorse possible in her.  And yes, it sticks in my craw that my tax dollars are going to keep someone like that alive.  In this case, I'd be willing to see my tax dollars spent to end her life.

                  To give you an example of how callous sociopaths are, look at Richard Ramirez:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Ramirez

                  Were you aware that he has a pen pal page?  http://www.lostvault.com/penpals/detail … ;iAd=13697

                  He's also been implicated in the death of a 9 year old child:
                  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2 … cases.html

                  He's been given 25 more years of life than that little girl was.  And you'd be content to let him live, get letters from his groupies and screw his victims.

                  1. livelonger profile image94
                    livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                    First of all, don't put words in my mouth. You've done that twice now.

                    Let me repeat: I don't care if she continues to be a wicked human being until the day they die. She might very well be. If she continues to get love letters, either real or ones imagined by you, then who cares? Is it better if she's killed and deemed a martyr by these same people? It makes absolutely no difference. She'll have to deal with that in the afterlife, or never, depending on your belief system.

                    The fact is that killing is killing, and I don't support it when there is an alternative. But I am fine with her being used as an employee of the state, in a chain gang or whatever, paying for the victim's child's welfare (something she won't be able to do if she's dead). I am the last person who thinks prisoners like her are entitled to a comfortable life behind bars.

          2. profile image0
            sneakorocksolidposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Texas can help fix that!

            1. livelonger profile image94
              livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Texas is too busy roasting anyone who could have even conceivably committed any crime to bother with an out-of-stater.

          3. ledefensetech profile image72
            ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Only if you mess with the numbers.  You'd have to add in the costs of lawyers and the appeals process.  Given the rising costs of incarcerating someone, you know paying for meals, somewhere to put them, healthcare, etc., costs in that respect are rising. 

            Also don't forget that because you have people on death row for, well decades sometimes, statisticians like to factor that in to increase the cost of executions rather than leave it out.  After all, it doesn't cost much more to keep someone on death row as it does the rest of the prison.

            1. rhamson profile image75
              rhamsonposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Thats some good VooDoo economics by discounting out all the factors. Why let the facts get in the way of a good story?

              1. ledefensetech profile image72
                ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Prove it's voodoo economics then, oh wait, I forgot, you don't argue using facts, you just make statements.  Sorry.

                1. rhamson profile image75
                  rhamsonposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  Are your little feelings hurt or do you want to make up and play nice?

                  I don't have to prove the facts you do it for me in your own statement. I really wonder what you consider a fact.  Reread your statement and honestly critique it yourself.

                  When you are done and then come to the realization it costs more to execute someone than it does to incarcerate them.  Maybe you have a new take on the constitution and due process we would all love to hear.

                  1. ledefensetech profile image72
                    ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                    Maybe you need an example of how to use facts to bolster an argument.  OK, here's how you do it.



                    Here's the source:  http://www.cga.ct.gov/2000/rpt/olr/htm/2000-R-0461.htm

                    I think I stated something along the lines that you can't really compare the costs of capital cases and non-capital cases.  This report validates that statement.  Do you have a reasoned rebuttal or more ad hominem attacks?

  15. TimTurner profile image75
    TimTurnerposted 8 years ago

    Her torment in prison will be far greater than the death penalty.

  16. Valerie F profile image61
    Valerie Fposted 8 years ago

    I don't think values are relative or individual when it comes to another person's life or death. By that logic, this criminal was only adhering to her own individual values.

  17. Valerie F profile image61
    Valerie Fposted 8 years ago

    That, and she clearly regarded her victim as "subhuman trash" who, for whatever reason, was not entitled to live. The only difference is that she violated the law of a society which- I might add- has its own record of arbitrarily denying the innocent their right to live, too.

    If she's not an ongoing threat to others, there's no reason to kill her.

  18. ledefensetech profile image72
    ledefensetechposted 8 years ago

    Too bad the source you used only hosts the articles.

    http://law.jrank.org/

    It's an axiom in law that you can find case law to support or refute any particular law or position on the law.  That's why law has become less than fair, shall we say.  Which is why I quoted from commissions.  While politically motivated, at least they have to show facts and figures, unlike legal opinions, which are just that opinions.

    Again, you show your lack of skill in debate when you claim a maneuver to be ingenuous when it compares two things for similarities and differences.  Just admit that you're biased towards your point of view and are unwilling to look at any data that contradicts your point of view.

    1. rhamson profile image75
      rhamsonposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Well I don't think a Liar Liar point of view toward facts is a very strong one on your part.  Attack me as you wish but your argument does not hold water and face it with your counter to my offering, you have proven once again how married you are to your opinion.

      I could spend countless hours finding this law review of court findings about what "might" satisfy your musings but the fact of the matter remains that throwing around highly dubious "authoritive" opinions at the topic does not give you any more credibility than anyone else.  Next insult puulease.

    2. rhamson profile image75
      rhamsonposted 8 years agoin reply to this
  19. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 8 years ago

    I, just like others, have my own view and obviously many may disagree and some other may agree. How ever, the simple fact that one person took the life of another person, doesn't diminish the value of their life.

    As horrible as their actions are and may be dispised by others, it doesn't help solve a growing 'evil' that is constantly threatening humankind's existence.

    The 'capital punishment' is a final solution and cannot be reversed. How ever, the fact that a person lost their life at the hands of a severely irresponsible person needs to be equalized. Putting a criminal who takes the life of another in a prison, while those who had nothing to do with the taking of that person's life is to support the burdening of housing, feeding and healthcare for the rest of their life is insanity run amok. There is no rational excuse to put further burden on society, to hope this person can be rehabilitated, or feel remorse for their actions.

    Not to mention, there is always a possibility that said person could live long enough to become a detriment to society, yet again. To think that a person who commits a horrible criminal act, such as this, wouldn't do it again, if given the chance is completely irrational, specifically because of past experiences of other before her has proven that these forms of actions will be repeated, if given the chance.

    Even, though 'capital punishment' is a final answer/solution is can be rationalized for the safety of society's overall health.

    The argument on cost of 'executions' is not a legitimate reason for NOT doing it. The costs are something that needs to be re-evaluated or assessed properly, or solidified through other alternative thinking. Such as, the 'lethal injection' form of execution is only costly because of the legal drug manufacturers make it costly because it is government buying the drugs that are administered, and not because the drugs are expensive to make.

    On that note- if an alternative solution can be obtained, then I would suggest an alternative solution be used. An example: the drugs seized and destroyed by government DEA agency personnel, so the drugs are not found back on the street or beneficial to drug lords, can be used to administer a lethal overdose for 'lethal injections' and inmates can go out with a bang. You administer just enough to do the execution.

    Therefore the costs and methodology can provide society with a reinforced 'way' of seconding guessing of taking someone's life.

    Right now, people kill because they have no 'fear' of prison or the justice system rules. They also know, if they can survive in prison, that they are going to get out eventually. Even a life sentence makes available parole to some. Life without the ability of parole, puts extreme burdens on the backs of society to maintain the inmate's living status, which isn't fair to more than just a life for a life.

    It comes down to thousands, if not millions of people get to suffer for this one person's action, besides the fact that one person did lose their life.

    There really isn't 'justified' action. But, what is in the best interest of society is what is expected.

  20. europewalker profile image78
    europewalkerposted 8 years ago

    I can't believe a person could be that cruel, the same should be done to her.

  21. Paradise7 profile image85
    Paradise7posted 8 years ago

    Oh, my God!  That's horrible!!!! That poor woman and her poor child!!!  It makes me so sick to think of it.

  22. profile image0
    Scott.Lifeposted 8 years ago

    First a legitimate question, will killing this woman for her crime stop it from happening again? Will it give people who are considering the same kind of crime pause in doing it themselves? Probably not. What is often overlooked in cases like this is that these people have no respect for life most of all their own. They don't fear the death penalty or prison because inside they totally hate themselves and all the world. They see themselves as worthless and without value what so ever. What she has done is totally horrible. There is no denying it.

    However I see alot of callous judgment and condemnation going on in this thread from people that will probably never experience either jail time or taking a life. There is nothing easy or casual about life inside a prison. there is no such thing as easy time and anyone who would like to argue the fact is welcome to go do some time inside and reevaluate your opinion. Reading about jail, and watching prison specials on TV is far from the reality.

    I wonder if people would be so cavalier about the death penalty if they were the ones asked to perform it. Fighting evil requires evil actions so how then is the result good? This person may in fact be beyond rehabilitation today but she did not arrive here by herself. How long did this person suffer in her life at the hands of callous uncaring people before her spirit was broken and all sense of decency corrupted. People and dogs have alot in common neither are born cruel or mean, they are made that way, by the people closest to them.

    My heart goes out to the victim and their family, but to the criminals family also, both have now lost someone that will never be returned to them. Very sad.

    1. livelonger profile image94
      livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I believe studies corroborate this: the death penalty is not an effective deterrent.


      I don't think anyone thinks it's Disneyland. Many of us don't think it should be.

      But, regardless of the factors contributing to this woman's psychopathic killing of an innocent human being, it doesn't change the fact that she does not deserve freedom. If she can be economically productive and spend the rest of her life taking care of her victim's child, all the better.

      I do believe we need to understand better what makes people act like this--to me it's absolutely inconceivable that anyone with an ounce of conscience would, but I'm not a psychologist--so that it can be minimized in the future. Humanity has a pretty good track record of becoming a less violent species, at least on the interpersonal level.

      1. ledefensetech profile image72
        ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        We do understand what makes these people tick.  You want to worry on a real moral quandary?  Try working with a sociopathic kid.  A kid you know if they were let out into society, they would start killing.  I thank God I only worked with one or two kids like that.

        1. livelonger profile image94
          livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          You're innocent until proven guilty. You can't lock someone up until they actually do something, no matter how much you think that they might. I'm sure there are plenty of people that some people thought, for sure, they would end up killers but didn't.

          1. ledefensetech profile image72
            ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I neglected to mention that one of the kids, under 12 years of age, murdered his sister because he was jealous of her.

            1. livelonger profile image94
              livelongerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Well, that's one kid who, unfortunately, did live up to the expectations of him. Are you advocating for life imprisonment for child killers?

              1. ledefensetech profile image72
                ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                He did this before we got him.  He was already a killer.  To be honest, I'm not sure what we should do with him.  Not for his sake, but for the sake of possible innocents that might get caught up in hysteria, like that first grader who got suspended for a kiss:

                http://www.americanpolicy.org/educ/akisson.htm

                But yeah, in this kid's case I'd have little problem locking him up forever.

                The other kid I'm thinking of was a teen.  He tried to poison his grandmother and also set up a contraption that would have killed him when his grandmother opened the door to wake him in the morning.  The Rube Goldberg contraption failed. 

                Now that kid is an adult, living in a halfway house, mooching off Social Security, hanging around with juvenile delinquents and contributing nothing to society.

  23. prettydarkhorse profile image65
    prettydarkhorseposted 8 years ago

    death penalty to this woman, i agree, but to others who are commiting heinous crimes but wasnt proven beyond reasonable doubt. whole life sentence is enough.

    in other societies (philippines for example), rich people can get away with anyhting, best lawayers and they get away scott free, only those who are poor are sentenced to death by lethal injection because they cant get rich lawyers to defend them.

    1. Flightkeeper profile image74
      Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      That's true here too.  The rich and famous can usually get off less worse than normal people because they can hire the best lawyers and they usually have the jury's sympathy.

      1. prettydarkhorse profile image65
        prettydarkhorseposted 8 years agoin reply to this


        oh if thats the case, then death penalty is never the solution to stop heinous crimes because there is imperfection to the system...justice system.
        What if you executed somebody wrongly accused, and after many years because we have DNA now, he isnt actually the one who committed the crime?

        1. Flightkeeper profile image74
          Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Exactly, which is why poor people are at a disadvantage. Actually, I'm surprised that she wasn't sentenced to death because of the nature of the crime. I don't have all the facts but the state might not have the death penalty or there might be mitigating circumstances.

          1. prettydarkhorse profile image65
            prettydarkhorseposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            need to read more about it now, LOL thanks flightkeeper

          2. ledefensetech profile image72
            ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I'm curious as to what you would consider mitigating circumstances.  I can't think of any.

            1. lrohner profile image82
              lrohnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Ditto, Ledefensetech. This was repeated and horrible abuse and imprisonment over a long period of time on someone who was not mentally all there. And teenaged boys were taught to do the same thing. And for the record, the ONLY reason I'm for the death penalty in this case is because I think the US prison system would be way too cushy for this broad. If we were talking life in a Mexican prison, well.....  smile

            2. Flightkeeper profile image74
              Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Off the top of my head, one mitigating circumstance is if she was under the influence of a regular drug habit, if she was slowly becoming insane, something that would make her not know right from wrong.  It sounds far-fetched but since I didn't really know the facts of the case and know only that she tortured this woman that's why I mentioned mitigating circumstances.

              1. ledefensetech profile image72
                ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Even the kids we got that were abusing hallucinogens didn't have episodes like this woman did.  Neglect would be one thing and I could understand how a person with a habit could neglect someone like the victim, but this lady tortured and taught others to torture the victim.  That's a decision, not the result of drug use.  Like I said, I can't think of any mitigating circumstances.

                1. Flightkeeper profile image74
                  Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  Well good for you and you have no problem sentencing her to death but my answer is different from yours and as I said there might be mitigating circumstances that I would consider and you won't.

                  1. ledefensetech profile image72
                    ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                    Chill, all I said was that I couldn't think of any circumstances.  It doesn't matter anyway since she was sentenced to 30-45 years.

  24. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    Two wrongs never make right...

  25. Jery profile image59
    Jeryposted 8 years ago

    I haven't read all the posts here, so forgive me if I seem a little rough here, but I think we should go back to firing squads for people like that. A bullet is cheap, quick, and final, and a much more humane death than the one she imposed on that poor disabled woman. There are so many selfish people in this world, who could do something like this to another. The world would be a better place without them in it!

  26. Ralph Deeds profile image65
    Ralph Deedsposted 8 years ago

    Cases like these where innocent people have been executed are why we don't need the death penalty:
    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/execute … y-innocent

    Moreover, research shows that the death penalty is not an effective deterrent of capital crimes.

    And cases like these where innocence was established on death row before an execution:

    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/innocen … lty#inn-st

    Moreover, the U.S. is one of the few advanced countries that still practice capital punishment. My state, Michigan, banned the death penalty 1851 and was the first English speaking government in the world to do so. Currently, Michigan is one of 12 states that don't have the death penalty.

    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/node/2020

    1. Jery profile image59
      Jeryposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It would certainly stop that woman from doing it again!

      1. profile image0
        Scott.Lifeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        So would life in prison

        1. Jery profile image59
          Jeryposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          True, but, and some will cringe at this but I don't want to spend all that tax money on her. Now don't get me wrong here, I'm not ready to pull the trigger at this very moment, she would have to be found guilty as charged with any mitigating circumstances taken into consideration. If she was found guilty I don't think she should be shown much more mercy then she herself showed to the woman she had complete control over.

          1. profile image0
            Scott.Lifeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I said this in another post, but today in Tennessee the board of audits released the cost figures on execution versus life in prison, and given the price charged by the suppliers, in addition to appeals, and legal fees on top of the average wait for execution. Life in prison is actually cheaper over a 30 year time frame. I know I was shocked too, but its another case of Government suppliers raping the fed on costs. Hanging is the cheapest form of execution and still an option in several states.

  27. profile image0
    Louidam1posted 8 years ago

    The death penalty should be the same way she killed that pregnant women so she can feel the pain that women went through before her death.

  28. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    One interesting twist that everybody ignores. Would she do the same, if there was no monthly SS check involved? Would she even bother with putting a poor women in her house?

    1. profile image0
      Scott.Lifeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Good point Misha, I'd say if there were no payoff involved then probably not, but that in itself is sad.

    2. Flightkeeper profile image74
      Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      That's what was unknown for me.  What was the relationship between those women? How did they even encounter each other? This case kind of reminded me of that Bette Davis movie, Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, where one of the women just got weirder and weirder.

      1. Misha profile image77
        Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I agree, but I was rather talking about the government in its infinite wisdom giving money to mentally disabled. Doncha think it's a recipe for disaster? How many handicapped people still suffer the same fate, forcefully being kept barely alive as inmates for those checks?

        Without Social Security this kind of crime would be hardly possible...

        1. Flightkeeper profile image74
          Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Well the check by itself doesn't prompt that kind of criminal behavior otherwise it would be the norm.  I'd like to think that she is an aberration.  And I don't put scams in the same category either. That woman exhibited willful torture.  It was really unnecessary in order for her to get that check.

          1. Misha profile image77
            Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            How do you know? I would think it does. Mentally disabled having some money are too easy of a target to not be exploited, unfortunately.

            And yes, sure, torture likely was absolutely unnecessary to get the checks. The information is very limited, but based on the article, I would think this woman kept her victim for some time, and then started to realize the kind of power she had over her. As usual, power corrupts - so here comes bullying and torture. I don't even think she intended to kill her golden goose, she probably just overdid unintentionally. Or may be this were her kids...

            Nite Flite smile

        2. ledefensetech profile image72
          ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I found that kind of strange too.  Usually there is a guardian that takes care of the finances, I'm not too sure what happened in this case. 

          The check was only one part though, the torture was something else entirely.  If the check were that important, I don't think this lady would have starved the victim.  But then again, she's obviously nuts, so it's a bit hard to see where this lady is coming from.

          1. profile image0
            Scott.Lifeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Ha "she's obviously nuts" and that's called a mitigating circumstance, nothing but net, goodnight ladies and gentlemen...sorry man I just couldn't resist. I saw you on here again and had to see what you said. Should we execute crazy people with no hold on sanity or rationality, there's another question?

            1. ledefensetech profile image72
              ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Sigh.  There's crazy and there is crazy.  I'd hesitate to execute someone who is truly MR or suffering from something like schizophrenia.  There is, however, another type of crazy.  Someone like Richard Ramirez is crazy, but different than a sufferer of schizophrenia or some other mental disorder.  He was methodical and deliberate in his madness.  John Wayne Gacy was likewise crazy.  Even someone like Timothy McVeigh and Osama bin Laden all carry the same brand of craziness. 

              Or would you argue that their actions are the actions of sane, rational people?

              1. Ralph Deeds profile image65
                Ralph Deedsposted 8 years agoin reply to this
                1. ledefensetech profile image72
                  ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  I believe I've said in the past that I'm opposed to the death penalty because of the chance we'll murder innocents.  This is a pretty open and shut case, on the other hand, and is so horrific that I can't see any other outcome.  I very much doubt this woman is innocent.

                  1. Ralph Deeds profile image65
                    Ralph Deedsposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                    LDT, another significant item we agree on! Let's keep searching and maybe we'll find more!

              2. profile image0
                Scott.Lifeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Sigh.... Six Days you wait six days to start this back up? Okay but moving on in life you have a good time debating with yourself.

  29. profile image0
    Scott.Lifeposted 8 years ago

    Goodnight Misha,Leden.., and everyone else its been a lively discussion and yet another example of how not to let the forums reduce you to lower levels of assanine behavior. I would apologize but that would be too noble and human, so I will instead say thank you all for your opinions and insight they have caused me to once again take stock of my own thoughts and position.

    1. Misha profile image77
      Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Nite Scott, take it easy buddy, it just the letters on your screen. smile

  30. Flightkeeper profile image74
    Flightkeeperposted 8 years ago

    Night everybody.

 
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