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Are Non-Americans writing in Hub Pages really welcomed, or is the Site primarily

  1. jonnycomelately profile image82
    jonnycomelatelyposted 4 years ago

    Are Non-Americans writing in Hub Pages really welcomed, or is the Site primarily for Americans?

    A lot of discussion and feedback to Questions and Topics seem to be of concern mostly to people of the U.S. of A.  How do you feel about us non-citizens commenting about religion and politics in America?

  2. DommaLeigh profile image59
    DommaLeighposted 4 years ago

    I feel hub pages are for every one. I am always open to thoughts and ideas from every one, no matter where they are from. As far as politics, American Citizens know what we read in our papers, we form our opinions on what is publicly known and if it is not a main stream concern we have to dig out the truth. The U.S has a bad habit of only telling one side of the story thus I think it is good when others from other countries let us know what they are being feed in their homeland because some where in-between the two is the truth of what is really going on. Open dialogue is the only way we can make sure the politicians are actually doing what they are claiming and are not leading us around like sheep to the slaughter. I was taught never to believe what you read till you can support it with facts and the facts are out there and can be found in many different ways and through many different sources, like Hub pages.

    1. ChristinS profile image96
      ChristinSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I totally agree! I often read news sources from outside the US to get better understanding of different perspectives. I think we are and should embrace learning from people all over the world.

  3. moonfroth profile image75
    moonfrothposted 4 years ago

    On most issues, I find the dominant (in numbers) American hubbers open to opinions from non-Americans.  The notable exception in recent times has been the issue of Obama's  health care system, and the willingness of opponents to this system to believe the most outrageous misinformation and outright lies about, specifically, the Canadian system--often held up as a model for Americans to emulate.   As a Nation, I think Americans tend to regard "made in America" values and initiatives as inherently superior to  others, so it is indeed a stretch for many Americans to acknowledge that Others may hold SUPERIOR values or make superiot products--but by and large, I think Americans get it and are coming to realize that they have a lot to learn from Others.  The economic downturn in the States, and the economic rise of China and India, have been humbling experiences for thoughtful Americans--even for them to acknowledge that the rhythm of national power as an ascendency is just that--a RHYTHM.  In the history of mankind, no Nation has stayed on top constantly.  Greece fell,  Alexander's Empire fell.  Rome fell.  Maintaining openness towards the perspectives of non-Americans, while coping with the possible demise of your own requires a hefty dose of largesse.   I think Americans are trying hard to develop the kind of consciousness needed to cope creatively with the challenges the country is facing right now.  I think further that Canadians are uniquely positioned to analyze the American psyche  perhaps a little more successfully than observers from afar.  We've shared the world's longest unprotected border, enjoyed the world's most vigorous flow of trade (tens of billions of dollars a DAY) between two nations, and comixed culturally since 1814, when by mutual consent we stopped a little War we had between us.  We even gave Americans basketball (invented in Canada) and let them have our best hockey players ('cause they make more money on US teams),  I mean, how magnanimous can a country be?

  4. Lisa HW profile image74
    Lisa HWposted 4 years ago

    I think HubPages, itself, has made it clear that non-Americans are more than welcomed on this site, but I think it's also clear throughout the community and in the interactions among the very diverse mix of people on here.  Whether or not someone is capable of using English grammar in his Hubs is the one issue that people generally make when it comes to whether someone's meet "standards" (but a lot of English-speaking people don't use grammar very well either, so that isn't only reserved for non-Americans).

    (I don't imagine I'm the only one on this site who has sometimes very much felt as if Americans on the site are in the minority.  I love that people from all over the world can be on here, sharing ideas/discussions.  That's the best thing about the Internet (as long as it's not the kind of sleazy, questionable, stuff that comes from US people, too, but that often comes from some countries more than others).

    Personally, I'm not interested in the religious beliefs of anyone, no matter who they are.  I don't have a problem, though, with someone from another country writing about something like, for example, the Catholic Church scandal.   That kind of thing isn't an American thing.  It's a "human" thing and in this example, a Catholic Church thing.

    With politics, I think everyone (including Americans) should be extremely careful about being a) extremely well informed, and b) a reasonable and objective enough thinker before spouting off about politics in public.  I don't see why anyone from somewhere else shouldn't write about it.

    On some issues, people will, though, be at some disadvantage by not actually "personally experiencing some political issues".  Regardless of where someone's from (including the US), I think people can't always have "legitimate" opinions about the kind of incidents/issues that require "up-close-and-personal" to be fully understood.  Opinions about the "larger-scale-picture type of things are a different matter; and, personally, I like to see what non-Americans have to say about some of the larger-scale things too.  I don't want to be exposed only to what is thought within our borders.

    The one thing that does irk me is people who obviously hate America and/or seem to be anxiously awaiting some major downfall, who have little use for it or for Americans (sometimes only because of a preconceived idea about what "all Americans" are or do) but who come to a site like this to try to earn American dollars from an American site.

  5. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 4 years ago

    I think they are welcomed so long as they make the effort to write in US English. Non-Americans often have education, experience, and knowledge that can be helpful or entertaining and I don't take issue with that here on HP or elsewhere. As far as Q & A, forums, etc., sometimes non-Americans do not have the actual experience and knowledge that we Americans do particularly on the issues of guns, religion, and politics.

    It's not uncommon for them to arrive at an opinion due to inaccurate or outdated information that has no actual relevance to what Americans are experiencing currently. Unless it is crystal clear that the non-American has lived in the US for at least a few of the past several years and is knowledgeable about American history, politics, religion (or whatever the topic), I doubt they have much of the information to fully understand where we and all our issues could stem from or how they could be resolved. Just my opinion..everyone has one smile

  6. Bronterae profile image62
    Bronteraeposted 4 years ago

    There are a lot of great answers here but I would like to add a bit.  My little brother moved to Germany for 10 years, when he came back with a German wife, he acted like he knew what had really happened here in the last decade and proceeded to preach socialism at me.  He also had a hard time realizing that the polarizing parties hit a peak with GW Bush and Chaney Oil.   Back then a lot of blame was thrown around and probably deserved but it was a moment in the past, not the future.  He thought he knew what people watched on TV (just fox) and is/was passionate to spread his socialism and big government high tax system on the internet.  He forgot something, "this country is powered by dreams and dreams don't come from government handouts".  He doesn't know, he is no longer a true American in his heart, and I don't welcome his attitude.  There is a thing called the "American Dream" and it's real.

    If you believe in dreams, you can say whatever you like.  Unless you can't write in intelligible English. smile

    1. ChristinS profile image96
      ChristinSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Some people can turn anything political. So someone who has different ideas than you who lived and experienced life outside the US is not a true american if they don't think like you? wow....

  7. jpcmc profile image89
    jpcmcposted 4 years ago

    I'm a Filipino and I feel that I am welcome here.  Of course, the number of hubbers from the Philippines is quite small compared to other countries.  As such, it is understandable that many questions and topics will be about those that concern the community members.  It so happens there are a lot of members from the US. 

    Our views and opinions on different topics will help enrich the discussions.  Likewise it's interesting to know how other people think.  Cultures are very diverse, and this diversity makes Hubpages truly stand out. 

    Politics and religion are very sensitive issues that needs to be discussed.  This community offers a venue for that.  Sometimes, conversations become heated and differences are highlighted.  But, many still keep their composure.  I've seen other online communities that are really tactless and crass.  At times they are just rude and insensitive.  To be part of such a community, having an open mind does wonders. 

    This is no mutual admiration club, nor is it a culturally insensitive community.  I've come to appreciate and respect Hubpages members opinions and views whether they the same as mine or totally different.  What's great is that I have received the same level of appreciation and respect from others.

  8. RachaelLefler profile image97
    RachaelLeflerposted 4 years ago

    I don't mind it, but I wonder what people who aren't native speakers of English are doing trying to write for an English-only website?

  9. loveofnight profile image81
    loveofnightposted 4 years ago

    Speaking for myself I love and welcome the voices/words from people all around the world. I have been educated by the sharing of history, traditions, clothing, foods.....from the many people that I have met while on Hubpages. The many differences makes us richer as a people.