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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (17 posts)

Why do some Americans see patriotism as an aberration, instead of something to b

  1. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    Why do some Americans see patriotism as an aberration, instead of something to be proud of?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/9159728_f260.jpg

  2. Fred Arnold profile image59
    Fred Arnoldposted 3 years ago

    I would say that patriotism has led to differing forms of prejudice in many societies. As the world grows more humanitarian, ideals that do not conform or accentuate the need for acceptance get berated. When it comes to America there's a lot to be proud of but there is a lot to despise. I for one think that unwarranted pride leads to illogical inconsistencies in decision making and one must be careful.

    1. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Excellent answer!

  3. lovemychris profile image62
    lovemychrisposted 3 years ago

    Because patriotism is gauged on your political party. If you're Republican, you're a patriot. If you're Democrat, you hate America. Easy, isn't it?

  4. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    I believe there is a difference between patriotism and wearing "rose colored" glasses as one goes around screaming to the world "We're the best!" Part of being a patriot is also (questioning) our government's role in the world and it's decisions from time to time.
    Free speech does not mean everyone is required to agree. It's the opposite. It's gotten to the point where if someone disagrees with certain aspects of how the country is moving they're branded as not loving America. The last thing the founding fathers wanted was a nation of "Stepford Citizens".
    In the eyes of many during their eras people like Jesus, Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi, and Nelson Mandela were branded as traitors, trouble makers, or criminals because they were pushing for change from the status quo. All of them were arrested.
    Generally speaking one person's "patriot" is another person's "traitor" or "rebel". I'm certain Great Britain's view of the Revolutionary War is different from our own. In their eyes the colonies were disloyal.
    Just  because someone doesn't plant a flag in their front yard or subscribe to being an isolationist or want to go to war over every single dispute, or believes we as a nation could be doing better to address issues we face as "mankind" does not mean they do not love America.
    Everyone wants safer neighborhoods, higher living standards, and enjoy the multitude of freedoms that come with being an American citizen. The disagreement is in (how) we want to shape our future and not in our love for the nation. Debate can be healthy.

    1. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      eloquently stated - and so true!

    2. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wonderful answer!

    3. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I completely agree. Well said.

  5. Sami Hanson profile image75
    Sami Hansonposted 3 years ago

    I actually studied this in one of my prejudice classes in college. Fred is right on.

    Patriotism (the 'aberrant' kind the author is referring to), stems from Right Wing Authoritarianism which has certain domineering core characteristics. Modern day patriotism comes from the desire to be the best country, to be dominant of others, and to have a very egotistical view of the world. Instead of taking patriotism for what it truly is (love for ones country) it has become tainted and synonymous with nationalism.

  6. dahoglund profile image82
    dahoglundposted 3 years ago

    It might be semantics. Some folks confuse "patriotism'  with chauvinism, a word that in recent years has been misused by some   groups. .They use chauvinism when they really mean (I think) such things as "male chauvinism. I wonder is there a female chauvinism?

    1. profile image60
      retief2000posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      American patriotism is no different than British patriotism or Canadian etc...it is love of country, that is hardly chauvinistic.

    2. lovemychris profile image62
      lovemychrisposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It is when you only think you are the patriots! Didn't like Bush: called America hater. Do like Obama: still called America hater...and now of course, the prez hates America too! Isn't that just so superior of them?Lowly Dems never rate, do they? aww

  7. profile image0
    Daveadamposted 3 years ago

    Every single little thing that the USA or UK government does, they do for their own benefit not the peoples....They've got a nice little system going now where people have forgotten, that their supposed to serve us not their big business buddies....It's so obvious even to a blind man on a galloping horse, & yet most people can't see what's going on right in front of their own eyes....I'm from the UK & I'm ashamed of my government, & most of the people in the UK for not caring....1.5 million people died in Iraq "after" they won the war, just left there to die including 500,000 kids....I've met many Americans through working in the states, & had some great times....There's nothing wrong with the people of America, they just need to use some logical thinking & actually look at what their heading towards....Look where your government is taking you, to a complete Orwellian state....Your completely bankrupt just like us, & with no real way of paying that debt off without selling America....With governments nothing ever gets better, it only gets worse as they compete for even more power & more control of our wealth etc....Until we're totally 100% reliant on them, & then it's good night.

    1. lovemychris profile image62
      lovemychrisposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      They both serve Zionism. Once that's gone: we are free.

    2. profile image0
      Daveadamposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Well lovemychris don't let them get you down, as we say in the UK..Forget conspiracy theories for now even though their really happening, & look into life with a logical mind..You'll be surprised what you may find, i was very surprised in a GOOD

    3. lovemychris profile image62
      lovemychrisposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Get me down? It has devastated me. I thought Shock and Awe was bad enough.But this slaughter of people with NO remorse make me just...there are no words.I am truly starting to believe it's a nonhuman source.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GgUyZ4F7CU

  8. Old-Empresario profile image81
    Old-Empresarioposted 3 years ago

    The etymology of "patriotism" refers to a devotion to the Patriarch or the Patriarchy--essentially the government concept of "father knows best". Since pushing out King George III, Americans have been against the idea of a government telling us what to do and how to live our lives. So we aren't really patriots in that sense.

    Nationalism refers to devotion to one's nation-state (or, in our case, nation of states). Like all other countries, the USA tends to be more tribal than nationalistic. We look after ourselves, our families, our neighbors or any other groups to which we identify--it's often cultural.

    Nationalism is up there with religion. It's sort of an arbitrary and non-pragmatic concept based on beliefs and faith. It gets people to do things for odd reasons simply because they believe something that the person in charge says. What most Americans truly care about is money. It's one of our charms. What's best about this is that someone devoted to something real, like money, is predictable and can only be expected to act within their own interests. Nationalists and religious followers don't follow or pursue anything tangible. They are unpredictable except to do what their leaders say. So, to get at the root of it: What do these leaders want? Probably money.

 
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