Example of racist differences between US and Canada

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  1. Castlepaloma profile image73
    Castlepalomaposted 3 months ago

    Don Cherry a hockey Icon got fired on Remembrance Day after 30 years of hockey top broadcast. His comment was...

    Downtown Toronto, forget it . . . Nobody wears a poppy.”  Cherry said: “You people love, that come here, whatever it is, you love our way of life. You love our milk and honey. At least you can pay a couple of bucks for a poppy or something like that. These guys paid for your way life that you enjoy in Canada, these guys paid the biggest price.”

    Compared to

    Trump stated Mexican, They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists and murderers. And some, I assume, are good people.”

    Some Trump assume are good people

    Half my family are Mexicans and have no history of any crime. I felt like kicking Trump in the balls

    Social media is calling for Cherry’s head.
    A #firedoncherry hashtag had comments like “Please tell CBC that it MUST #FireDonCherry on this very #RemembranceSunday for desecrating the memories of so many with his bigotry & hate. Please help send a strong message that racists and xenophobes have no place on Canada’s national public broadcaster.”

    Unlike many Trump's racist comments much stronger, that should have had anybody fired.

    One reason why many Canadains are upset because we holds more immigrated than any country in world, per capita. There is 65 million refugees move around every year many from war invaded countries worldwide. Trump is cutting legal immigration in half. Where most wealthy countries per capita have more immigrates. This spells distater for US diversity strength and economic growth.

    Looks like another Hockey Icon, for hire. Canadain Hockey players are our fighting men.

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      What in the world does any of that have to do with racism (I'm assuming the poppy is similar to the use in the states, honoring fallen veterans)?  What am I missing that makes the statement about poppies somehow racist?

      1. Castlepaloma profile image73
        Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        There were alot of serious complaints from immigrates, to me it was not particularly offensive, but we are talking Canada.

        Don Cherry said you people. He didn't add in white people. To add on Don also said,  a good Canadain will buy a Poppy. Canadain are one the best in the world for staying out of wars.

        Beside two top things for my happiness is my health and what I can forget. I don't regret any pass wars. Let just ban wars, I only regret I don't discourage wars in the future.

        Don and Trump are always promoting the police and troops as the most honorable and important people in the world. When authorities murderers kill more people than the public do.

        Why do the military need more money when they already the largest corporations in the world. It will never make America great again, unless they stop going always on the offensive. The rest of the world is on to them.

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 3 months agoin reply to this

          I guess I just don't get it.

          Immigrants were upset that Don said people don't use poppies.  That isn't racism.

          Don didn't single out whites; he referenced ALL Canadians.  That isn't racism.

          You don't like wars.  That doesn't have anything to do with racism.

          Don and Trump "always" promote police and military as honorable.  That isn't racism, and claiming authorities are murderers isn't either.

          That the military needs money has nothing to do with racism.

          So, to me it looks like just another rant, with the race card thrown into the mix for no good reason.  Unless I'm still missing something - something to do with race that I'm just not seeing.

          1. MizBejabbers profile image90
            MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

            Wilderness, You're not alone, I don't get it either.

  2. Castlepaloma profile image73
    Castlepalomaposted 3 months ago

    I remember a Toronto policeman went into a backyard of a east Indian. Who was banging on his carpet on a clothesline. The policeman said jokingly. What is the matter, can't get it started this morning.

    Police man was fired, that is how sensitive Canadain racist comments are.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image90
      MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      If that's racism, I certainly don't want to live there. That's not racism, that's just a silly ethnic joke (and a darn funny one to me). Back in the 1960s there was a proliferation of Polish jokes very similar to that one. However, I lived in Texas at the time, and I heard them all as Aggie jokes. It was later that I moved back to Arkansas that I heard them all over again as Polish jokes. You couldn't call the Polish jokes racist because most Poles are Caucasian and the jokes were circulating among the white community. (I don't know if the African-American community circulated them.) So they became "ethnic jokes." I guess the Aggie jokes were also an ethnic joke, sort of, since the Texas A & M Aggies were their own community with their own following, but they couldn't have been racist either because the Aggies are a multiracial mixture.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image73
        Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        From standup comedy it is a rule to not do put down jokes of people of color or women. Whites are open season.

        MacLean
        Nov 10, 2019
        I want to sincerely apologize to our viewers and Canadians. During last night's broadcast, Don made comments that were hurtful and prejudiced and I wish I had handled myself differently. It was a divisive moment and I am truly upset with myself for allowing it

        MacLean has worked with Don Cherry for 30 years. At the end of Don Cherry comments, MacLean gave a thumbs up

      2. GA Anderson profile image92
        GA Andersonposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        I thought it was funny too. That was a quick-witted policeman.

        GA

    2. Nathanville profile image93
      Nathanvilleposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      I don’t want to get embroiled in a heated argument on Racist difference between Canada and the USA because I don’t know enough about the Canadian Culture and Society to have any firm views; and I don’t know who Don Cherry is, or anything about him anyway; albeit Trump is disliked by 79% of the British population because of his racism.  In contrast, 72% of Brits approved of Obama when he was President.

      However, from a British perspective, and from what I know of Trump and the USA, I can speculate that Canada is more racially tolerant than the USA; and therefore presumably (like Britain) there is less tolerance against Racism in Canada than in the USA, and that perhaps Canadian Laws against racism is much tougher than the USA.

      In Britain Racism is covered by the ‘Hate Speech Laws’.  Under British Hate Speech Laws:-

      •    Expressions of hatred toward someone on account of that person's colour, race, disability, nationality (including citizenship), ethnic or national origin, religion, gender identity, or sexual orientation is a Criminal Offence. 

      •    Any communication which is threatening or abusive, and is intended to harass, alarm, or distress someone because of their colour, race, disability, nationality (including citizenship), ethnic or national origin, religion, gender identity, or sexual orientation, is also a Criminal Offence, and

      •    ‘Incitement to Hatred’ because of a person’s colour, race, disability, nationality (including citizenship), ethnic or national origin, religion, gender identity, or sexual orientation is a Criminal Offence.   

      •    The maximum penalty for ‘Hate Speech’ in Britain is 7 years in prison.

      I’ll digress from ‘Hate Laws’ to ‘Assault & Battery’ to give an example of how criminal laws can be used in Britain to cover what most Americans may think of as ‘trivial’ e.g. spitting!

      UNDER ASSAULT IN BRITISH LAW
      If another person fears violence, that is enough for the offender’s actions to be classed as common assault e.g. for example if someone spits at someone, but it misses then under British Law that is classified as ‘common assault; and if they spit at someone and it lands on them then that is classified as ‘battery’.

      To successfully prosecute such a case, it must be proved that the defendant intended to cause the victim to feel that violence [spitting] would be used against them; without this proof, there are no grounds for a conviction for assault.  However, if a deliberate intention is established e.g. the person spat at the other person intentionally [with intent], then battery (such as spitting) carries a maximum penalty of six months in prison.

      The most recent famous case was a professional footballer who was suspended without pay for the rest of the season for spitting at a driver and his daughter.  In the end the police dropped the case against him for ‘Assault and Battery’ [spitting] partly because the footballer showed remorse (very apologetic), but also because the driver recorded the event using a handheld device [mobile phone] while driving, which in itself is a criminal offence.

      Jamie Carragher filmed spitting:  https://youtu.be/yAo6SNt4lLg

      1. Credence2 profile image80
        Credence2posted 3 months agoin reply to this

        ""However, from a British perspective, and from what I know of Trump and the USA, I can speculate that Canada is more racially tolerant than the USA; and therefore presumably (like Britain) there is less tolerance against Racism in Canada than in the USA, and that perhaps Canadian Laws against racism is much tougher than the USA."

        Greetings, Arthur,  nice to see you again.

        I have spent a total of two weeks in Canada and travelled across several provinces, and from my perspective your comments about the difference between the USA and Canada in this topic is spot on, as you usually are.

        Canada has been blessed to have avoided a Civil War, legalized segregation, and the racial strife that was the result. Traveling through Canada with my antenna at the ready, I found much more stark examples diversity and a greater acceptance of those that are different who settled in Canada from around the world. The Canadians say they have a patchwork quilt rather than a melting pot. Which implies accepting that which is different rather than amalgamation to some preset norm. I consider that a more sophisticated attitude.  They have their problems in this area, but relative to  America it is like comparing a pond to Lake Michigan. Maybe, it is part of the civility associated with being part of the British Commonwealth?

        I don't know about specific laws in Canada regarding race relations, but I have found people generally more accepting even if the laws were not there

        1. Nathanville profile image93
          Nathanvilleposted 3 months agoin reply to this

          Thanks for your feedback Credence2; it helps me to understand Canada a little better, especially your penultimate paragraph, with reference to your quote “The Canadians say they have a patchwork quilt rather than a melting pot”; which fits well with what little I know about Canada.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image73
            Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

            I call it a mosaic vs an international airport.

          2. MizBejabbers profile image90
            MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

            Nathanville, the difference I see between a "patchwork quilt" and a "melting pot", would be the patchwork quilt would remain isolated diversities, while the melting pot would be the intermarriage of the ethnic groups, and presenting myself as an example, I use the word "ethnic" loosely.  For instance, in the beginning of this country, my ancestors were Dutch, Scots-Irish, English, French and German, all northern Europeans. I know that I am all those bloodlines because my DNA test indicated that my genealogy reports were accurate. The U.S. still had the patchwork quilt effect in many areas until after WWII when job and career opportunities caused many people to move around the nation, which resulted in intermarriage. However, we still have areas of concentration, but these people do intermarry with people outside their own immigrant groups. I would have figured that Europe and Canada did the same. History shows that Europe did, and so does my DNA. I also have a small percentage of Southern European and Northern Mediterranean DNA, along with 5% Viking. So, we really are a melting pot when you look at it genetically.

            1. Nathanville profile image93
              Nathanvilleposted 3 months agoin reply to this

              You raise some interesting points MizBejabbers; your interpretation of “patchwork quilt” vs “melting pot” is very much how I saw it, but I am aware of the ‘French Canadian’ and ‘British Canadian’ division in Canada so Castlepaloma’s points on the ‘patchwork quilt’ seems to fit well with that!

              Yep, generally, as you state, we do have a ‘melting pot’ in Europe e.g. integration of all ethnic groups regardless to their colour, race, creed, nationality or religion etc., except for Northern Ireland where the Catholics and Protestants are still deeply divided; as they have been for centuries.

              Peace in Northern Ireland, But Religious Divide Remains [Prime example of the “patchwork quilt” which Castlepalma described]:- https://youtu.be/j48XwoTeFC4

              1. Castlepaloma profile image73
                Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

                Canada prides itself at home and abroad as a country made up of a cultural mosaic rather than a cultural melting pot. The mosaic is based on our belief that Canada as a whole becomes stronger by having immigrants bring with them their cultural diversity for all Canadians to learn from. Let say, East Indian is their first culture and Canadain is their second culture and so on with each immigrated country culture. . Funny when I was young hardlly seen any of these people of color. Saw my first black man when I was Age 8, that was in Detroit.  I travel to discover all these countries culture  worldwide. Today I am an minority in a big Canadain city.

                1. Nathanville profile image93
                  Nathanvilleposted 3 months agoin reply to this

                  ‘Cultural Mosaic’ in the context you describe e.g. an immigrant being East Indian 1st and Canadian 2nd, is something I can relate to, as it has a striking similarity to the ‘cultural mosaic’ throughout Britain and between the five Nations (Kingdoms) of the United Kingdom.

                  For example, a Scotsman is Scottish first and British second, and Welshman is Welsh first and British second; different Cultures and different languages:  All of which enriches the British Culture; but never call a ‘Scotsman or the Welsh’ English.

                  It’s not just the different languages of the five ‘nations’ of the UK; also across Britain are well over 30 distinctively different local accents and dialects (four in London alone) e.g. Cockney, Estuary etc.  And the locals are often proud of their own accents/dialect e.g. both my maternal and paternal ancestors have lived in England since 1066 (almost exclusively in the West Country, near Bristol); so (as a native speaker of Bristolian) I consider myself to be Bristolian first, European 2nd, and British 3rd..

                  For example of the mosaic of cultural diversity across Brittan: The title of this classic Bristolian Song below, which only Bristolians understand:-

                  “Thee's Got'n Where Thee Cassn't Back'n, Hassn't” means “You’ve got it where you can’t back it out, haven’t you”.

                  Other Bristolian words, in common use in Bristol, that appear in this song includes:-
                  “girt” which means “big”
                  “Twas” means “It was”
                  “bis” means “you”  etc.

                  Adge Cutler & The Wurzels (Thee's Got'n Where Thee Cassn't Back'n, Hassn't):- https://youtu.be/AnKjwOLiBTg

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image73
                    Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

                    Sounds like a more peaceful and diversity solutions for civilization in general.

                    Rather than conquer and divide.

  3. hard sun profile image89
    hard sunposted 3 months ago

    It seems that the "you people" wording is the main complaint?

    1. Castlepaloma profile image73
      Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      If he used the words Everybody instead of,  You People. Although, the people of colour pick out alot words to them were pointing them out, not whites.

      1. hard sun profile image89
        hard sunposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        Okay. So, if I were more familiar with the racial makeup of downtown Toronto, and what no,t this would be more clear. I'm not often a fan of labeling any group of people as being one way or the other. This goes for whether that group is white, brown, tall, skinny, etc. So, I can understand the upset here, just not to the extent of people being fired over it. And, I certainly don't like the notion that people can say what they like about "whites" and that's always okay as there's no such thing as "reverse racism." I recently had a long conversation here with a lady about the whole minorities cannot be racist thing though.

      2. MizBejabbers profile image90
        MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        After I stopped laughing and went back and reread the original post, I think the alleged insult was the fact that the immigrants came to the land of milk and honey (Canada) for all it's benefits, yet they would not buy  poppies to support programs for the veterans who fought and (some) died to assure the citizens those freedoms. Personally, in that light, I think he really does have a point. However, it was perceived as a racial slur perhaps because many of the immigrants today are people of color. But being a U.S. citizen who hates political correctness, I think that if the shoe fits, wear it.

        Castlepaloma, the money from those poppies does not go to the military unless Canada has a different policy from the U.S. It goes, at least here in the U.S., for veterans programs to help the broken men and women (who have fought for those freedoms the immigrants are enjoying) to heal. But since many of the immigrants are white Europeans, I personally still don't see it as a racist comment. I couldn't find statistics on the number of people of color as opposed to white European immigrants to the U.S. and Canada. What I did find was that most of our illegals, in the U.S. at least, were from people who entered the country legally and stayed on after their Visas expired. 600,000 of them during the period the article was written.

        https://www.npr.org/2019/01/10/68366269 … ta-tell-us

        By the way, "buy a poppy" is a misnomer at least in the U.S. You donate (however much or little you wish to give) to the veterans cause on Veterans Day, and are given a poppy to wear as a sign that you remembered our veterans. I donate and wear mine proudly, and furthermore, I stand with Don Cherry. I think McLean was a jackass to apologize.

        1. GA Anderson profile image92
          GA Andersonposted 3 months agoin reply to this

          Nicely stated MizBejabbers. I agree. I also wear the poppy on Veterans' Day. (and I am one)

          GA

          1. MizBejabbers profile image90
            MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

            Thank you for your service, GA.

        2. Castlepaloma profile image73
          Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

          We are civilizated enough we can forget our pass wars to contribute to our own health and happiness of no regrets, noboby in my family wears a poppy.

          Besides there would have not been a world war 2 if the Rothschild bankers didn't financial supply both sides of the war.  War is a hazard to your health pass, precent and future.

          I do think McLean was a wimp for throwing Don under the bus after 30 years on the most famous duel of hockey broadcasting. He always did look uncomfortable and  embarrassed working together. He had no problem dumping him to save his own skin.

    2. MizBejabbers profile image90
      MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      But the way I read it, "you people" refers to immigrants as a whole, not a particular race of them. Are all of Canada's immigrants people of color? I think not.

      1. hard sun profile image89
        hard sunposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        I'm not stating this should be something people get all up in arms over. I was simply trying to sort out where the outrage came from. "You people" is generally not looked upon as a respectful way to reference any group of people. The color doesn't make much difference to me.

        1. MizBejabbers profile image90
          MizBejabbersposted 3 months agoin reply to this

          HardSun, I understand your point, but I was just stating a point, too. That's why in the South, we say "ya'll", not "you guys" or "you people", and others laugh at us for it. Maybe we are the PC ones. lol

          1. hard sun profile image89
            hard sunposted 3 months agoin reply to this

            Okay, I see. You can certainly read "you people" this as everyone as a whole as opposed to just a certain group. "Ya'll" definitely seems PC, and would work better in the context. That is funny. In the Midwest, we get a lot of the "you guys".

          2. Credence2 profile image80
            Credence2posted 3 months agoin reply to this

            Y'all is taken in a different context  (not offensive) than "you people"

            1. Castlepaloma profile image73
              Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

              I would not dare to say, You People,  to a black man.

              1. hard sun profile image89
                hard sunposted 3 months agoin reply to this

                I definitely would not either. It is definitely considered disrespectful, and in some situations, will bring about a lot of unwanted drama and pain. This is true in the US also.

            2. Castlepaloma profile image73
              Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

              An interview with Global News earlier this week, Cherry said he was disappointed by MacLean’s apology, but that the two remain friends.


              Don said “He buried me. I was very disappointed the way he handled [it],” he said. “I don’t want to condemn him but I was very disappointed.”

  4. sdaughtry profile image72
    sdaughtryposted 3 months ago

    I can see where the author would like to go with this, but sorry I have to agree with everyone here, it is not a racist remark. Stupid perhaps considering his career and the mass population intelligence placed into the equation. I know I will catch the devil for that remark..lol.

    First: look up the definition for Racist. It does not fit.
    Two: "You People" in meaning possession of who attended, therefore a simple pejorative comment.
    The use of "Everybody" would have been easier for someone or anyone to jump that Racist Train they so love to jump.
    Sadly, in his case, Everyone seemed to jump this mass minded fury of words.
    Simply put, Don Cherry, tried to show the obvious, that no one seems to take the memorial of deaths leading to the freedoms that they so greedily use seriously. In fact, it was used against him in this case.
    As for MacLean-well, he seen the writing on that wall after the fact and saved his own butt. Now I will say this as a matter of opinion as well, that MacLean still feels the same way, but that does not put bread on the table.

    But what do I know? Good luck is all I can say.

  5. Castlepaloma profile image73
    Castlepalomaposted 3 months ago

    Don Cherry himself stated it was his time to step down. The man is 85 years old.

    Even a couple of people had been fired from my Mexican ex wife for calling her a spic. I do agree that Canadain are over reacting to direct and indirectly racist words.

    On the other hand what Trump says and puts in action is more racist that I have ever experienced in my lifetime. The point of showing the difference between US and Canada veiws and actions on racism.

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      What has Trump done that was racist?  Shut down travel from countries that refuse to vet their travelers and, at the same time, are hotbeds of terrorist activity?  Or was it that he incarcerated people for committing the crime of entering the country illegally?

      1. Castlepaloma profile image73
        Castlepalomaposted 3 months agoin reply to this

        What other President since the 60s can hold a candle the the racism of President Trump. He is the most  crassk, racist and dishonest. I know also from working with him from first hand experience. His racism has been in lawsuits and racism profiling gose back to the 70s. Along with a world record of lawsuits.

        On the campaign trail, Trump repeatedly made explicitly racist and otherwise bigoted remarks, from calling Mexican immigrants criminals and rapists to proposing a ban on all Muslims entering the US to suggesting a judge should recuse himself from a case solely because of the judge’s Mexican heritage. Trump's cutting legal immigration in half.

        The trend has continued into his presidency. From stereotyping a black reporter to pandering to white supremacists after they held a violent rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, to cracking a joke about the Trail of Tears, Trump hasn’t stopped with the racist acts after his 2016 election.

        Most recently, Trump tweeted that several black and brown members of Congress are “from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe” and that they should “go back” to those countries. The tweets, aimed at Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), and Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), exemplify a common racist trope used against immigrants and minority groups who criticize US policies. Democrats, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, condemned Trump’s tweets as racist.

        Trump call many countries sh_tholes. Most of these countries are doubling US GDP. Then frighten people the Muslim are coming to America to chop off your head. There has never  been one case of an American head chopped off in America soil by   Muslims. Same with 7 Muslim ban in America when none of these countries kill anybody in America. He likes black football players and boxers because they are beating themselves up. I could go on forever, he won by selection not a true Demoncracy election.

    2. hard sun profile image89
      hard sunposted 3 months agoin reply to this

      The word your wife was called is something likely to get someone fired in the US. Despite this, Trump supporters would find a way to defend him if he said this word.

 
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