Do On To Others Not Us --- We Just Care About A Green Planet Not Kids

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  1. Sharlee01 profile image89
    Sharlee01posted 17 months ago

    Look here not there...
    https://hubstatic.com/16277790_f1024.jpg

    Biden turns to country with documented child labor issues for green energy mineral supplies: 'It's egregious'

    The Biden administration opened the door to financing mining projects in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Zambia to bolster the global green energy supply chain as it pushes ahead with its climate agenda, despite the DRC's documented issues with child laborers being used in such mines.

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken entered into the agreement Tuesday, signing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the two nations and lauding their work improving the electric vehicle battery supply chain. During a signing ceremony, Blinken said the "future" was happening given the fact the importance of cobalt for manufacturing electric vehicles.

    "I really want to commend the DRC and Zambia, their governments for their leadership and vision in developing an electric vehicle battery council," Blinken said on Tuesday. "This is the future, and it is happening in the DRC and in Zambia."

    Green energy technologies like electric vehicle batteries, solar panels, and wind turbines require a massive expansion of cobalt, copper, lithium, nickel, graphite, zinc, and other mineral production. The vast majority of mining and processing of such materials, though, takes place outside the U.S., making the nation more reliant on foreign minerals despite its large domestic resources.

    In 2021, the DRC alone mined more than 70% of the global supply of cobalt while the U.S. mined just 0.4% of the world's cobalt, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The DRC also has an estimated 3.5 million metric tons of cobalt reserves, the largest amount in the world.

    However, independent investigations conducted in recent years by the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) and Amnesty International have documented how many cobalt mines located in the DRC employ child laborers. The Biden administration also released a report in October showing that child labor continues to take place in the mines.

    "Many children we spoke to told us that they were frequently ill. Inhaling cobalt dust can cause hard metal lung disease – a potentially fatal condition," a 2016 Amnesty International report stated. "Skin contact with cobalt can cause dermatitis – a chronic rash. Yet the children and other miners have neither masks nor gloves to protect them."

    "The children told us that they endured long hours – up to 12 hours a day – working at the mines hauling back-breaking loads of between 20 and 40kg for US$1-2 per day," it continued. "Many had nothing to eat all day. Fourteen-year-old Paul, who began mining aged 12 and worked underground, told us he would often: ‘spend 24 hours down in the tunnels. I arrived in the morning and would leave the following morning.’

    Overall, about 40,000 children are believed to work in mines in southern DRC, according to UNICEF.

    "It's egregious that the Biden administration would enter into an MOU to mine critical minerals in the Congo where we know they use child slave labor to mine these minerals and they have almost zero labor standards and almost zero environmental standards," Rep. Pete Stauber, R-Minn., the top Republican on the House Natural Resources Energy and Mineral Subcommittee, told Fox News Digital in an interview.

    "And yet this administration will not allow mining in the United States," he added.

    Stauber said his subcommittee will conduct investigations into the Biden administration's mining policies once Republicans take control of the House and he assumes the chairmanship of the panel next year.

    "We are not only going to legislate, but we're going to have oversight," he told Fox News Digital. "We want to know why this administration continues to not allow mining in the United States. We want to know why they've pulled federal permits without allowing an environmental impact statement to move forward."

    Earlier this year, the Department of the Interior canceled two existing hardrock mineral leases in the mineral-rich Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northern Minnesota and announced that it would move forward with a 20-year ban on new mining projects in the region, citing environmental reasons.

    The projects contained about 88% of the nation's cobalt reserves and had a project labor agreement in place for the site to be unionized.

    "Don't just listen to Joe Biden and his activist administration's words, look at their actions," said Stauber, who represents the district where the projects are located. "Joe Biden, as far as workers go and mining goes, is 'anywhere but America and any worker but American.' It's unacceptable."

    In addition, the Biden administration has implemented regulatory roadblocks on mines in Alaska, Arizona and Nevada which have massive copper, molybdenum and lithium deposits."

    The National Mining Association (NMA), meanwhile, said it wasn't surprised at the administration's action given the immediate need for resources, but argued there was significant need for a better long-term strategy.

    "It would be a mistake to interpret a strategy intent on ensuring immediate supply as a long-term comprehensive strategy that will effectively meet demands for the future," NMA spokesperson Ashley Burke told Fox News Digital. "There needs to be a much greater focus on mine permitting at home."

    "We have robust mineral reserves here in the U.S.; there is simply no better place for the administration to be supporting mining projects, supporting our economy with high-paying American jobs that are producing American materials under world-leading environmental, labor and safety standards," Burke continued.

    The NMA has repeatedly sounded the alarm on U.S. mineral supply chains as the federal government pushes green transition policies. In August, the group said relying on mineral imports has been an "increasingly problematic issue for decades and has now become a crisis." The group has also advocated for a streamlined permitting process for mining projects.

    The State Department didn't respond to a request for comment.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden- … -egregious

    I am sure I need not even share my views on the issue, with anyone here, I think my view would be assumed by many here.

    So, what do you think about this issue, this latest bit of slime coming out of this administration?

    I hope the subject can be directly addressed. Can't imagine anyone would take the opportunity to dance around in this slippery slime.

    This is the kind of report that slips through the cracks with left new media.  Fortunately, Fox does share what Biden is up to.

    1. GA Anderson profile image88
      GA Andersonposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Which of those criticisms would be at the top of your list?

      That we are not using American resources first, or that we are dealing with nations that condone child labor, (is it forced?), or that we are making ourselves vulnerable via supply-chain disruption?

      If the child labor is not forced, even as bad as that would be, it is not the same as the image that forced child labor brings to mind. If the labor is not forced, then it is a poverty issue and isn't a deal breaker for me. With or without us, if the children don't work somebody doesn't eat.

      The supply-chain point could go either way, depending on the availability and infrastructure of our resources. If we have the resources and an infrastructure that could be easily ramped up, (a quick skim indicates it could be), then reinforcing the supply-chain, (via this deal), makes sense.

      As for the 'use America's resources first' criticism. I don't have a good perception of the mining industry and its environmental footprint. I know they have gotten better, but still, if it is not critical that we use ours, then I'll let another nation that has nothing but its mining industry do the work.

      If the child labor isn't forced and if the DRC supply-chain link isn't our only source, then I think this is an issue of selective outrage by Rep. Stauber.

      GA

      1. Sharlee01 profile image89
        Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

        I thought my comment would be overkill, I mean could you perhaps not lip-sync what I would say? I could in your case,  and you were true to what I felt your feelings might be. Not completely though.

        So, you have drawn me into the dance, it was easy, was it not?  As to be expected ---  I will share my view, " That we are not using American resources first, or that we are dealing with nations that condone child labor, (is it forced?), or that we are making ourselves vulnerable via supply-chain disruption?"

        Yes, to all but are these children forced to work due to having the need to eat?   It would be obvious that they are. My topper would be not doing something courageous to stop this form of child labor, and perhaps making sure the Federal aid we pour into that country is spent on the very poor. But, that makes too much sense, does it not? It sickens me to see us walk on the backs of children to supply this possess clean energy.

        I have shared this before, however, it bares repeating, the new green energy will increase the need for minerals that are very dangerous, and will cause many health problems for those that choose to make money mining them. Whether in the US or around the world the need for these minerals will be dangerous, and many will become very very rich, as we did with oil.  Oil is not in any respect as poisonous as many of the minerals that we need for the New Green lifestyle.

        "If the child labor is not forced, even as bad as that would be, it is not the same as the image that forced child labor brings to mind. If the labor is not forced, then it is a poverty issue and isn't a deal breaker for me. With or without us, if the children don't work somebody doesn't eat."

        Can't reply to this, just too many detours, and in my view, a simple flight from the bottom line. A great way to tuck the problem out of sight out of mind. In the end, children are being taken advantage of by their parents, their country, and society.  So, should that be the end of it, no real need to even look at the bottom line? America will add to these children's horrendous problems. No help will be coming, aid yes, that most likely never reach these children. But America needs those minerals, so we are and will be comfortable in "do on to them, not us. So, if children don't work somebody doesn't eat. However, they most likely will die due to not even being supplied gloves or masks. You do know when these minerals are worked with in America, hazmat suits are worn?

        But I have some good news --- Biden intends to put America first, and mine for all minerals that will be needed. I won't list the states that will be affected, but just tell you the list includes the most beautiful states we have in America. Abd I did add the link that will substantiate Bidens big plans in regard to mining minerals. 
        https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-roo … -minerals/

        So before long, mining may come to your state, not sure where you
        live. I won't bore anyone with the science. I will leave that to those that may be interested in the problems that occur with mining the minerals that we will need for "The Wizard Of Oz Crazy green deal. (Please note I feel very passionate about fixing our planet, but doing so where we don't end up with more of a mess than we started).

        I think your assessment of my thread is very much logical.  I disagree and feel it is typical, I think it fits in well with where our society has ended up at this point.

        The last thought --- this administration is going to make the rich very very very much richer, and I must laugh --- they claimed during COVID to follow the science. Where the hell did the science go in regard to this mining issue? 

        I think some here will get out of their Google tennis shoes.  However, those tennies just won't take them where they need to go.

        I am grateful you posted. Your comment will open conversation, I hope to hell the path does not lead to Trump. (meant to be funny) "Tis the season" to agree to disagree.

        Merry Christmas!

        1. GA Anderson profile image88
          GA Andersonposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          I think it appears we agree that mining isn't pretty and we wouldn't want it in any state if we have the choice. Maybe that covers the supply-chain reasoning too.

          Child labor seems to be your top criticism. Life is hard. There are probably dozens of poor nations in the world where the reality is that if the children don't work someone won't eat. We can't fix that for the world. We already try, generously, but it is just a drop in the bucket.

          So, right now the children in the DRC are laborers mining hazardous minerals. If we don't participate those children will still be working. The minerals will be sold to another buyer and nothing changes for the children.

          If we demand the end to child laborers before we will participate, I think the minerals will still be mined without us and simply sold to someone else instead of paying the added cost of meeting our moral demands. Still, nothing changes for the child laborers.

          I don't see our involvement as promoting child labor or as a moral demerit.

          The flip side is that we ramp up our mining resources and let China come in and buy the DRC's mineral output. I don't think that scenario will change the child labor situation either.

          The children's plight is not because of us and in this particular instance nothing we do, relative to the mining issue will change it. If that is true, then a moral decision to not participate hurts us without helping the children.

          GA

          1. Sharlee01 profile image89
            Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

            So a nice soft retort...  So if people simply stop purchasing a good, produced by children their Nations would not have the incentive to perhaps produce their goods under safer conditions?  However, that would take a world of Nations that simply cared about children, and perhaps not assent to such practices.  Yes, that is sticky due to it is very obvious that child labor has been going on for many hundreds of years.

            But, your attitude is very much the norm. So, in reality, is it not true if there was no one buying minerals that are mined by children the mine would fold or have better working conditions, as we do in the few mines we have in the US? 

            America has sat on a shaky pedestal for many decades, this deal to promote children working in mineral mines has, in my view. put a big ass pin in our plastic blow-up pedestal.

            1. GA Anderson profile image88
              GA Andersonposted 17 months agoin reply to this

              I only have the information your OP provided and have only spoken to the criticisms you noted.

              I see no moral high-horse in the details of your OP. Surely you don't think we should isolate ourselves from interacting with any nation that doesn't share our culture's moral values?

              GA

              1. Sharlee01 profile image89
                Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

                As I said, in my opening words --- "So a nice soft retort...  "

                I had no problem with you expressing your thoughts, you did stick to the subject of the thread, and I noted your opinion.

                In regard to high-horse in the details. I do see high-horse details coming not only from the information  UNICEF offers but from Rep. Pete Stauber's concern.

                "It's egregious that the Biden administration would enter into an MOU to mine critical minerals in the Congo where we know they use child slave labor to mine these minerals and they have almost zero labor standards and almost zero environmental standards," Rep. Pete Stauber, R-Minn., the top Republican on the House Natural Resources Energy and Mineral Subcommittee, told Fox News Digital in an interview."

                I find both referenced various current problems. From how these children are put at risk due to working conditions, and that Biden is willing to enter into a contract that children work under these conditions.

                So, I guess we got something very different from the article. I saw UNICEF as well as Stauber who is a top Republican on the House Natural Resources Energy and Mineral Subcommittee. I would assume he is very well acquainted with what he speaks. So, yes we have two entities willing to mount a high horse on this issue. Both with information, and credentials we do not have. I take them as experts on what they might share.

                Are you diverting by asking me  "do I feel we should isolate ourselves from interacting with any nation that doesn't share our culture's moral values?"

                Is that not a very complicated question?  Is there no other solution to the issue than cutting off our noses, is it one or the other or are there many other solutions to stop child labor atrocities?  Could comment sense not tell you there would be? 

                I consider you very intelligent, and I think you know that. But you have me thinking you are willing to dance around the fire on this one.

                This mineral mining issue goes much deeper than this subject. Mineral mining is coming soon to many states in America. This administration will be turning over decades of regulations and laws on mining. But I have confidence they will more than sell the need to mine to most Americans.

                We need stuff... Maybe we can do without clean earth and water, who knows?

                It is clear Biden has not hidden the fact of his plan. It might be Americans just were not made aware of his plan --- media can be so fickled. Maybe if you have a moment check out Joe's plan.

                https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-roo … -minerals/

                I find it useless to discuss something that is written in stone.  But usually are more than one solution to any problem.

      2. Nathanville profile image92
        Nathanvilleposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        Thanks for sharing your views GA, what you say makes a lot of sense smile

        1. Sharlee01 profile image89
          Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, his comment was very comforting. So was Fayes. Makes me almost feel I can tuck all of this away in a nice hidden place. I mean, why bother with the problems that come with me having what I want because I want what I want... I mean don't most of us?

          1. Nathanville profile image92
            Nathanvilleposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            I’m not judging what is morally right and wrong; I’m just impressed by GA’s pragmatic answer.

            1. Sharlee01 profile image89
              Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

              I too respect GA's views, for the sake of conversation, I shared mine. Which yes, I am overly passionate about.  Just hoped to add another view to the issue being discussed. No more, no less.  The subject is very disturbing and has many social variables.  So, now I must ask ---

              Where does the UK get its solar panels and wind turbines from, and are they considering bringing mineral mining into the UK? Will the UK produce more batteries for electric cars and will the UK produce semiconductor chips to promote clean energy?  Here in the US, we are quickly moving into both industrues. Will the UK follow suit?

              1. Nathanville profile image92
                Nathanvilleposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                To answer your questions, to the best of my ability:-

                #1:  Where does the UK get its solar panels?
                There are about six solar panel manufacturers in the UK; but I don’t know what percentage of solar panels installed in Britain are British made, and what percentage is imported from China.

                #2:  Where does the UK gets its wind turbines?
                All the wind turbines installed in the UK are European made, including manufacturing in the UK.  It’s big business that generates lots of British jobs and large profits for UK Industry.

                #3:  Is the UK considering bringing mineral mining into the UK?
                The short answer is ‘yes’.  There is also R&D (Research and Development) taking place in Britain for alternative suitable materials that are more environmentally friendly during the extraction/production stage; but that is still at an early stage of research.

                The detailed answer to your question is in this UK Government Strategy Policy Paper published in July 2022:  https://www.gov.uk/government/publicati … s-strategy

                #4:  Will the UK produce more batteries for electric cars?
                Yes:  The UK Government wants five large car battery factories to be built to meet domestic demand as new fossil fuel vehicle are set to be banned in the UK in 2030.  Currently two of those factories are being built, and currently the UK Government is in talks with six companies about building the other three factories that the Government wants.

                #5:  Will the UK produce semiconductor chips to promote clean energy?
                The UK does manufacture semiconductors, but it has a relatively low share of the global market.  However the UK is a world leader in ‘Design and Development’ of semiconductors; (that’s the UK’s bread and butter in the industry e.g. income and jobs generated in the UK from ‘Exports’ of our technology.

                #!!!:  One question you didn’t ask is “Is the UK doing R&D (Research and Development) into alternative batteries that don’t rely on rare minerals that are controversial in where and how they are mined?
                The short answer is yes.  Currently the National Grid is trialling a new battery that doesn’t damage the local environment during mining, and various British research labs are researching and testing alternatives.  I can’t find any specific links on these points at the moment; but these two related articles below might be of some interest though?

                •    https://www.imeche.org/news/news-articl … ithium-ion

                •    https://www.insidermedia.com/news/yorks … ght-online

                1. Castlepaloma profile image75
                  Castlepalomaposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  UK doesn't have to worry about Russian fossil fuel like Germany.  Scotland has strong oil production.

                  At the same time, the Government announced increased tax relief for investment in oil and gas production. Companies can be exempt from the Energy Profits Levy through a new Investment Allowance, and a First Year Capital Allowance. Altogether, this doubles tax relief on investments made in new oil and gas fields from 46.25p on every pound to 91.25p in every pound. A significant share of the increase can be claimed back instantly.

                  1. Nathanville profile image92
                    Nathanvilleposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    Absolutely right in your first sentence, except it’s not oil that’s the issue at the moment, its natural gas.  The UK gets about half of its natural gas from Scotland and most of the rest from Norway; unlike Germany who before the war in Ukraine got half of its natural gas from Russia.

                    However, before I can comment on what you say I’d like to see some links in support of your statement in your second paragraph.

                    Nevertheless, even if there is any validity in what you say, you’re only giving one side of the picture:-

                    Did you know that:-

                    1.    In November the UK imposed a 35% win fall tax on the British oil and gas companies. 

                    FYI a win fall tax (which has been used by the UK Conservative Government on several occasions on banks and oil companies over the decades) is a tax on profits over and above the normal taxes; and is only imposed on Industries making insanely huge profits by profiteering from a national crisis -  A win fall tax is effectively a form of ‘redistribution of wealth’.

                    2.    Although there is more untapped natural oil and gas underground (on land) in Scotland and England than there ever was in the North Sea off the coast of Scotland; those resources can only be extracted by ‘fracking’.

                    FYI the Scottish (Socialist) Government banned fracking in Scotland in 2015, and the UK Conservative Government banned fracking in England in 2019.

                    Liz Truss lifted the ban on fracking in September, for the brief few weeks that she was Prime Minister; but Rishi Sunak re-imposed the ban as soon as he became Prime Minister in October.

                    3.    The UK is the only country in the world to make carbon net zero by 2050 a legal requirement; which keeps the pressure on the UK Government to stay focused and committed to decarbonising Britain e.g. if the UK Government falters in its legal obligation to make the UK carbon net by 205 it risks being dragged through the courts by environmental activists for failing to comply with its own laws.

                2. Sharlee01 profile image89
                  Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  Thank you for taking the time to share. I was very curious as to how far the UK has come in regard to Solar and wind production.  It appears the US and the UK are on the same path, but the UK is moving ahead more quickly at this point.

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image75
                    Castlepalomaposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    China is the world leader in solar energy. One city  of 3 million mostly runs on solar energy. I run my business and tiny house on a $3500 solar system.  It's  only the political will and coded greed that interferes. UK dose lack sunlight , wind is a better source for them.

                  2. Nathanville profile image92
                    Nathanvilleposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    Thanks for your feedback, it's good to see the USA taking positive steps; and I hope to see good progress in the coming years. 

                    The UK is on course for 100% of its electricity to domestic homes to be from wind power by 2035; and for using natural gas to home for heating to cease by 2035; and for all new vehicles to be electric by 2030 - the current prediction is that by 2025 50% of new cars sold will be 100% electric. 

                    So the changes we are seeing in the UK, as we move towards a greener economy, are at this time taking at a very rapid pace.

    2. Castlepaloma profile image75
      Castlepalomaposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      The way they design electric cars and vehicles now. It is doing the earth and the people more harm than good than fossil fuels and gas.  I designed entire environmenal living systems to work in a tiny house communities. The only thing is transportation  has a long ways to go.

      1. Sharlee01 profile image89
        Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

        I agree 100%.  We need to slow down, and just consider the best ways to come to cleaner energy, without making the problem of pollution far worse. We have done harm to the air we breathe, do we want to poison the earth and water?

        1. Castlepaloma profile image75
          Castlepalomaposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          There are plenty of great minds for environmental issues that can be done, right now. Yet like myself, I've had greatly had interferences from the coded wealthy and Government handcuffs, to get them off the ground.

  2. Fayetteville Faye profile image62
    Fayetteville Fayeposted 17 months ago

    The horse was let out of the barn a long time ago.  At this point in time The global economy still requires a huge supply of raw materials that originate in Africa.  Large corporations such as apple, LG, major car manufacturers and Samsung have long since been doing business in Africa.  How can we stop them? Cobalt is in the laptops or desktops we are using right this minute.

    Cobalt is found in every lithium-ion rechargeable battery on the planet from smartphones to tablets to electric vehicles. It is also used to fashion superalloys to manufacture jet engines, gas turbines and magnetic steel.
    This isn't a new issue and does not have to do completely with renewable energy.  The advancements in technology have increasingly made us dependent on these rare Earth minerals.
    The world has grown reliant on lithium-ion batteries that power  most of our electronics. But the desperate search for the ingredients carries a steep cost as you have well laid out. Where do we go at this point?
    The first and only Cobalt mine in our country opened just months ago in Idaho.
    Domestic mining will be a challenge, according to experts and the U.S. Geological Survey. Its analysis finds that more than 120 million tons of cobalt have been identified on the planet. Of that, 1 million tons reside in U.S. territory. However, the latest USGS cobalt report estimates that only 69,000 tons can be “economically extracted or produced,” compared to 3.5 million tons in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    “There are some real challenges with trying to bring mining back into the United States in a big way. And for the damage it causes, it’s not necessarily clear it’s going to yield all that much."

    But back to Africa, almost all the cobalt mined there,  heads to China for refining and processing. Currently, China processes about 80 percent of the world’s cobalt.  So if there are supply chain disruptions or China simply wants to cut off Cobalt supplies then we would find ourselves in a pretty desperate situation.
    But based on operational mines and projected demand, forecasters predict that supply won’t be able to keep up with demand by 2030, or even as early as 2025.  Ultimately, the planet is on a path to Extinction.  Cobalt, just like oil is a finite resource: There is only so much that exists in the world.   These issues go deep into history and certainly way beyond President Biden.

    https://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org … ese-cobalt

    1. Castlepaloma profile image75
      Castlepalomaposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Interesting

      1. Sharlee01 profile image89
        Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

        Where do the UK get its solar panels and wind turbines from, and will they also be bringing mineral mining into the UK? Will the UK produce more batteries for all your clean energy?

    2. Sharlee01 profile image89
      Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

      No response...  heard it all, not buying. But you should win a Google gold star for this response. Thougt this might interst you ---

      SCIENCE
      Lithium could be key to turning Arkansas oil patch into a battery boomtown
      America's future will rely on batteries. The crucial chemical in those batteries is plentiful under Arkansas
      https://www.thv11.com/article/tech/scie … 3cd87156dc

      The Biden Adminstration will bring great jobs to your state.  And many others.

  3. Fayetteville Faye profile image62
    Fayetteville Fayeposted 17 months ago

    What about doing away with cobalt altogether and looking for an alternative? Recently, Cobalt free batteries have been developed and produced. But  apparently their composition is still troublesome.
    Research seems to say  that no transition mineral is perfect; lithium, manganese, nickel and zinc are all associated with human rights violations.  Nickel mining isn’t great either. It’s causing significant environmental damage in Russia as well as health risks.
    These minerals are an integral part of our world and have been for quite some time.  I'd say we are dependent on them at this point.
    So can cobalt or other earth minerals ever be mined sustainably and ethically?  I think so. Can we find alternatives? I hope so. There is a new battery. It’s called lithium iron phosphate  and it doesn’t use any nickel or cobalt. Its positive that these batteries last almost twice as long as cobalt-based lithium-ion batteries and they’re much cheaper.

    Also, the recycling of these batteries and other devices to separate out the minerals is another key component.
    The mining issues and the dependency on Cobalt certainly need to be addressed.  Failure to do this will mean batteries wreck lives rather than saving the climate.

    The executive director of the legal nonprofit International Rights Advocates, says the only recent example of bipartisan legislation that would target cobalt arrived earlier this year when Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Mark Kelly (D-Ariz.) introduced legislation that would ban defense contractors from purchasing cobalt, lithium, graphite and rare earths mined or processed in China.

    A significant amount of the cobalt mined in the DRC is processed in China, and some of the large industrial cobalt mines are owned by Chinese companies.

    But advocates doubt the bill would pass in the current environment.

    “The threshold at the moment, in the United States, to get passage of human rights legislation, you’ve got to reach an extraordinarily high bar,” Wormington said.

    Yes, in the hands of our do-nothing Congress I'm not sure how this issue gets addressed.

    Hopefully the very recent breakthrough in fusion technology will be the game changer we need.

    https://www.eenews.net/articles/cobalt- … an-energy/

    1. Sharlee01 profile image89
      Sharlee01posted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Let's return to the subject -- children working in mineral mines. And let me remind you --- we are Congress, we the people vote these people into their positions. We vote for the same people year after year and watch as fools as all get worse.

      We don't look for or give a shit who does what as long as we get what we want.

      Hey, it's clear your state will be involved with mineral mining. What will you do about that?  Your state is a poor state the people need jobs sort of like the same scenario as the children in Africa. So I am willing to look the other way to poison your citizens, your children, your land --- because I really want STUFF.  And I feel good that I am putting food on the poor people of Arkansas tables. Dors my view sit well with you? No

      Is it not the same view as some have agreed on here,  but for children far away from our shores? Well, wonder what anyone will feel when this mining occurs in your backyard?

      I will even admit when I looked into the states that will "benefit most ' from mineral mining (after the Bans are lifted).  I mean it's more than apparent I can't change anything, and it even seems there may be many on board with the new mining booms, and I don't want to take food from anyone's mouth. Yeah, that all makes good sense, I can buy that, yeah, it's all tucked away nicely.

      1. Fayetteville Faye profile image62
        Fayetteville Fayeposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        I'm trying to stick to the subject matter you brought up in relation to children working in African mineral minds and trying to be more solution oriented rather than simply seeking blame.  Overall I see this as an issue that's been going on for probably a decade or more, probably longer. As technology has advanced, the use of these minerals has increased.
        This issue isn't just related to clean energy. It's our computers, phones, tvs, appliances, medical equipment, military equipment and so on. 
        Obviously, absolutely we shouldn't be dealing with Nations that exploit children.   The Congo is the nation, by far with the highest number of these mineral reserves.   The minerals are woven into our daily lives essentially. So what's the solution? 
        The significance of Congo’s mineral reserves is too great for world markets to ignore. I'm not sure if your saying that President Biden should?  I know that President Obama had a provision in the Frank Dodd act about "conflict minerals" I don't think it changed much in the way that country mines.  We are talking about an extremely chaotic and corrupt government in the Congo. I'm interested in what you think is the path forward and the stance our should take?  What can our government do? What can American Business do?
        I see that there was a large lawsuit in 2019. The lawsuit argued that Apple, Google, Dell, Microsoft and Tesla all aided and abetted the mining companies that profited from the labor of children who were forced to work in dangerous conditions  that ultimately led to death and serious injury. Do we need more lawsuits? More regulation? Where would the minerals come from to keep these corporations in business? It's an awfully complex issue.

        In terms of where our government is in it's dealing with the child labor issue , I see the following outlined in the link below.
        I don't think they've completely ignored the issue of child labor but at the same time how do you police an industry in a rogue Nation?

        https://www.dol.gov/agencies/ilab/comba … ry-cotecco

        As of lately, I've seen no plans to mine in Arkansas but if that were the case of course I would have health and environmental concerns. Obviously we have child labor laws in place.
        I don't think any of us want any dangerous sort of mining going on anywhere but at this point in time  we seem to have an insatiable demand for cobalt, driven by technology. We need alternatives.

        1. wilderness profile image95
          wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          "...at the same time how do you police an industry in a rogue Nation?"

          Until such time as you have decided to allow any and all other countries to force us to follow their laws within our borders, you don't.  We are not the world's policemen, nor should we be.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image75
            Castlepalomaposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            Glad to hear that, for the longest time US was called the world police by many. The smaller the country are, who organize themselves,  the better off they are.

          2. Fayetteville Faye profile image62
            Fayetteville Fayeposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            Well that puts our country's tech corporations (and other types of corporations) in quite a conundrum. How do they obtain these rare Earth minerals in the quantities needed without dealing with the Congo?
            Technological advancement sure has brought us  a lot of ethical complexities.

 
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