The GOP and Hunter Biden’s Two Tired Government Special Treatment

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  1. peoplepower73 profile image90
    peoplepower73posted 12 months ago

    Trump’s appointed judge, Aileen Cannon, in her classified documents trial wants the trial to be over by September.  However, she wants all the lawyers on the case to have been granted top secret clearances. In terms of time, those two demands are in conflict with each other. I know having been granted a secret clearance with crypto access,  it takes months to get security clearances. But if you were Trump's Daughter and Son-in-law, they could get them immediately, even though they were denied by the clearing agency.

    In 2019, while Trump was president, he wanted both of them to have top secret clearances for the positions they were to hold as Trump’s advisors. They were both denied clearances by the clearing agency for various reasons.  So, Trump demanded they have the clearances immediately and bingo, they were granted them even though they were denied through the official clearance channels.  They both were given access to the most sensitive material and documents in the federal government domain.

    Judge Cannon, said on June 20, “since the case is related to classified documents, lawyers involved in the case will need permission to work with the material.”  Cannon asked that 'all attorneys of record and forthcoming attorneys of record shall contact the Litigation Security Group of the U.S. Department of Justice, if they have not done so already, to expedite the necessary clearance process for all team members anticipated to participate in this matter.'

    She gave the attorneys until Friday, June 23, deadline to reach out to the DOJ's Litigation Security Group - and they must file a notice by Tuesday, June 27, saying they'd complied with the court order.

    Why is it the GOP can look at Hunter Biden's case and say it is "two tiered government system" with special treatment for Biden's son but not for Trump and his family and other Trump aids?

    Is this going to be another delay tactic by Trump and his judge?  After all, she is a Trump appointed judge.  Will she be fair and impartial in dealing with Trump or will there even be a trial, knowing how Trump can manipulate lawyers and the courts to delay trials indefinitely.  It is in his best interest to delay it until he is elected president or some GOP president pardons him. Is this going to be another exercise in futility for the justice department just like the Russia investigation was?

    Here are the sources for my forum.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics … &ei=91

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- … SKCN1RD2HU

    1. Credence2 profile image76
      Credence2posted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Aileen is "loose Cannon" as her lack of experience and objectivity earned her a "smack down" from a higher court authority. She should recuse herself, but she won't do it. This is a very important case, I need a journeyman in charge and not an apprentice.

      She talks about an expedited process while requiring those involved in the case to have security clearance that takes months to obtain. She is just stalling in a backhanded way, to gain praise from the master. All the experts are saying this case won't see trial until next summer. Just another opportunity for the serpant to evade capture.

      Conservatives and the Right are always two faced never applying the same standards to others that they so willingly apply for themselves. Trumps offspring in relation to acquiring security clearances is a case in point.

      1. Sharlee01 profile image88
        Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        Oh my --- should the judge that handled Jean Carroll's case recuse?

        On May 5, 1994, Kaplan was nominated by President Bill Clinton to a seat on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

        So should we start just demeaning judges due to who appointed
        them?

        This would indicate one of two things Biased or hypocrisy --- you choose

        1. Credence2 profile image76
          Credence2posted 12 months agoin reply to this

          I did not look into it completely yet, but was the judge that handled Jean Carroll's case rebuked by higher court authority?

          https://www.nytimes.com/2023/04/27/nyre … trump.html




          Cannon's opinion got ripped to shreds by the Eleventh Circuit Court,” he said.

          That comes from on high and is not just my personal opinion.

          https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/ … 11242.html

          I don't see the two as equivalent, do you?

    2. wilderness profile image93
      wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      " After all, she is a Trump appointed judge.  Will she be fair and impartial in dealing with Trump or will there even be a trial, knowing how Trump can manipulate lawyers and the courts to delay trials indefinitely."

      It is truly fascinating to watch how anyone touched by Trump is instantly unethical, evil and should be banned from the country.

      1. Sharlee01 profile image88
        Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        Agree --- It has become sicking to watch --- no longer fascinating. I can't believe this upside-down mindset.  Brainwashed. I could say more, and should but I don't want to get banned.  YUCK

        1. peoplepower73 profile image90
          peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

          Wilderness: What do you call Jan. 6 where all the people went to jail for Trump and are still being prosecuted even as we speak?  No Trump, no Jan.6. 

          Even John Eastman, his advisor is being investigated for dreaming up the scheme to have Pence stop the certification process. Trump is a child living in a man's body. He has no respect for the constitution and will have people break laws for him, just like a child tests his parents rules.  He leaves a wake of death, destruction, and injury no matter where he goes or what he says.

          "It is truly fascinating to watch how anyone touched by Trump is instantly unethical, evil and should be banned from the country."

          That's hyperbole and you know it.

          1. wilderness profile image93
            wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

            What does any of that have to do with automatically condemning anyone that Trump ever spoke to?

            1. peoplepower73 profile image90
              peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

              Wilderness:  Please show me where I said those exact words.

    3. GA Anderson profile image88
      GA Andersonposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      I think I get the tone of your comment - it's a Trump/judge/legal maneuver to delay the trial until after the campaign. More corrupt judges and Trump dirty deals.

      From your posted information I read that the judge doesn't want delays that would bring more politics into the case. That sounds right, 'speedy trial' and all that.

      The clearance issue sounds reasonable too. There would be a month or two to get appropriate clearances for this trial material. Your information says the DOJ has a special department for this, so it's not a novel situation. That demand also sounds reasonably doable. 

      Where's the beef?

      GA

      1. peoplepower73 profile image90
        peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        GA:  I never said there is a special department for this.  Here is what Cannon said:

        "Cannon asked that 'all attorneys of record and forthcoming attorneys of record shall contact the Litigation Security Group of the U.S. Department of Justice, if they have not done so already, to expedite the necessary clearance process for all team members anticipated to participate in this matter.'

        She gave the attorneys until Friday, June 23, deadline to reach out to the DOJ's Litigation Security Group - and they must file a notice by Tuesday, June 27, saying they'd complied with the court order.

        Here is what that division is all about.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_St … y_Division

        Let's just see what happens in a month or two. Knowing how Trump operates, I'm very skeptical of this trial taking place in a timely manner.

        1. GA Anderson profile image88
          GA Andersonposted 12 months agoin reply to this

          Here is some info on that DOJ Group:

          The Litigation Security Group of the Department of Justice is a team of security specialists available to be detailed to the Court to serve as Classified Information Security Officers (CISOs) to assist in the handling and protection of classified information. These CISOs serve in a neutral capacity providing advice and assistance to the Court and the parties in the handling of classified information.

          If counsel require a clearance before the start of a case, counsel can coordinate with the appropriate security officers of their client or the agency. For the case before the Court, the Litigation Security Group can determine whether counsel have active clearances, and the level of the clearances, in order to know whether counsel are eligible to have access to . . .

          Source: . What is the Litigation Security Group of the Department of Justice?

          The lawyers' clearance issue seems to be something the DOJ has procedures for handling.

          GA

          1. peoplepower73 profile image90
            peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

            GA:  Thanks for the info.  Having procedures and doing it in a timely manner are two different things. It raises the question of, Are they even going to view the documents in the trial?

            The highest level of these documents are Top Secret and require a Sensitive compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) to view the documents. Do you think the LSG is just going to grant these people Top Secret Access, just because of this trial?

            Many of these documents have information detrimental to our national security.  Or maybe they are not even going to view them.  How about the jury?

            That's where Trump really screwed up by not managing the documents in accordance with a SCIF facility.

            Here are the requirements for a SCIF:

            Acoustic materials must prevent conversations from penetrating the walls, or “white noise” speakers may be used to mask conversations. From an electronic perspective, SCIFs must have access controls, intrusion detection systems, and data communications that meet the highest security standards.May 23, 2022

            1. GA Anderson profile image88
              GA Andersonposted 12 months agoin reply to this

              I was just offering info and a perspective Mike. I know nothing more than what media has presented.

              That there is a department for this supports the thought that this is something the DOJ has planned for. Perhaps the security needs, and the need to know the complete contents of documents are different for court use. *shrug

              GA

    4. Sharlee01 profile image88
      Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

      It would seem the judge with "good speed" put forth an order to expedite the Security clearances on the lawyers,  so they could handle the Classified, and Top Secet Documents not only at the trial but to enable them to defend their case.  I am not sure why you feel this Judge will cause --- "Is this going to be another delay tactic by Trump and his judge?" 

      Security clearances are needed.to move forward, she even gave the lawyers a very short timeline  " She gave the attorneys until Friday, June 23, deadline to reach out to the DOJ's Litigation Security Group - and they must file a notice by Tuesday, June 27, saying they'd complied with the court order."

      This order seems very sensible. After all this trial cannot proceed until this is accomplished. 

      I think she would be dragging her feet if she did not proceed with such an order. Explain your thought --- perhaps I don't understand where you are coming from.

      The Ivanka, Jared thing --- Trump had the authority to request/order they have security clearance. Both were working as an advisor to the President. You may not appreciate his order, but he was within the law.

      1. peoplepower73 profile image90
        peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        Sharlee:  Security clearances are not just granted cart blanche based on whoever needs them, even if you are the president of the United States. 

        Where is the law that says the president can grant security clearances to whoever needs them even though they were denied by official channels?

        Here is what is required to get a top secret security clearance. That doesn't even include the SCIF facility for viewing the documents and materials.

        https://news.clearancejobs.com/2020/09/ … -clearance

        1. Sharlee01 profile image88
          Sharlee01posted 12 months agoin reply to this

          I have no argument on what is necessary, and the typical procedures to obtain Security Clearance (SC)---  You divert. I am saying the President can order anyone he chooses to have SC. 

          "Can the president give anyone security clearance?
          Plus, the process works best when it remains apolitical, run by an investigatory bureaucracy rather than an elected leader. But it need not be so. The president can grant or revoke security clearances in any way he well pleases."  https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/ … n-ask-why/

          I would hope WAPO did the proper research.  I will say their record has become poor over the past 6 years.

          1. peoplepower73 profile image90
            peoplepower73posted 11 months agoin reply to this

            The Department of Justice (DOJ) has requested that the trial of former President Donald Trump regarding his handling of classified information be delayed until December, according to several court motions filed on Friday.

            Trump has been charged by the DOJ with willful retention of classified documents upon leaving the White House and obstruction of government efforts to retrieve the sensitive materials. The former president pleaded not guilty to all 37 charges this month and has maintained that the case is a "witch hunt" intended to interfere with his 2024 presidential reelection campaign.

            Special Counsel Jack Smith, leading the DOJ probe, has wasted no time in moving Trump's prosecution along, previously vowing that the former president would have a "speedy trial" in Florida court. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon seemed to follow suit, setting the two-week trial to begin August 14.

            But Smith has now proposed that the trial be pushed to December 11, arguing in a court filing Friday that the case will require additional time for Trump's defense counsel to obtain the security clearance necessary to sift through the evidence being used against him.

            According to Smith, arrangements are already under way to grant Trump's counsel "final clearance" to be able to review the classified documents in question, and the DOJ has already "moved swiftly to produce all unclassified discovery ... to the defense."

            "Even with the prompt production the government has arranged, the inclusion of additional time for defense counsel to review and digest the discovery, to make their own decisions about any production to the government, and for the government to review the same, is reasonable and appropriate," Smith wrote in his motion.

            Smith's request to postpone the trial date was filed alongside two other motions related to the case, including requesting that the court seal the list of witnesses that testified before the special grand jury and prohibit Trump or his co-defender, Walt Nauta, from speaking to the witnesses about the case. Trump's legal team was provided with the first batch of evidence that will be used against him on Wednesday, including the "grand jury testimony of witnesses who will testify for the government at the trial of this case," read the DOJ's discovery order.

            Smith also requested a pre-trial conference "to establish a discovery and motion schedule relating to any classified information" under the Classified Information Procedures Act on Friday.

            "Jack Smith is pushing for a swift trial and trying to force Trump's team to be the ones to ask for a delay," former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti said on Twitter in response to Smith's court filings Friday.
            "Although he's asking to move the trial date to December 2023, that is still an extremely early trial date, and his filings argue that the case is straightforward," Mariotti wrote.

            Legal analyst and former Alabama prosecutor Joyce Vance also tweeted that delaying Trump's trial "was inevitable" given that it "will take time to obtain necessary security clearance & for Trump lawyers to review classified materials, which can only happen in a [sensitive compartmented information facility]."

            "Nothing to be upset about here," Vance added.

            If granted, Trump could appear in federal court for his criminal case just months before the 2024 GOP primary vote in the spring. The former president is the front-runner among a crowded pool of Republican candidates, and even received a boost in poll numbers after being federally charged.

            Trump is also already on the books to appear in New York City's Manhattan court in March, regarding the 34 felony counts related to falsifying business records. The charges stem from the Manhattan District Attorney's investigation of several hush money payments made during the 2016 presidential campaign.

            1. Sharlee01 profile image88
              Sharlee01posted 11 months agoin reply to this

              I would assume it will be up to the Florida Judge to set the trial date. Which she did.  Trump's attorneys and Trump claim he should have the right to a speedy trial. I guess it will depend on what the judge rules.

              Not sure if she has the authority to expedite the Security Clearances. The Grand Jury looked at the Documents without Security Clearances.   I do know Trump has the right to stand on the Sixth Amendment which guarantees the right to a public trial. Which, he will most likely do, due to wanting pure transparency.   

              It will be interesting to see what the judge rules on any delays.

              1. Joiedevie profile image60
                Joiedevieposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                Grand jurors don’t get security clearances, and therefore they don’t get much detail.  They get general descriptions
                such as  “nuclear capabilities of a foreign country,” “military attacks by a foreign country” and “military contingency planning of the United States,”
                Hopefully his lawyers will be able to obtain the proper clearances. He doesn't tend to attract the best lawyers.
                Judge Aileen Cannon, who has been on the bench for less than three years and has tried just a handful  (4!)of criminal cases, doesn’t appear to have heard any cases involving classified material, according to a review of her career as a federal judge. She's sadly inept from my view.  But she's hand picked by Trump.

                1. Sharlee01 profile image88
                  Sharlee01posted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  The Judge who has been appointed to Trump's case may only have 3 years of experience,  compared to some other judges, but that does not necessarily mean Judge Cannon, is inept.  Is it wise or fair to judge her, despite her limited experience in criminal cases and classified material, she has the potential to bring fresh perspectives and unbiased judgment. It is possible that she has demonstrated exceptional legal knowledge and skills on the bench.

                  I might add, the selection process for judges often involves careful consideration and assessment of their capabilities and qualifications.  One must realize, she was appointed to the case, she had nothing to do with being selected.  Therefore, in my view, your comment seems a bit biased,    In my view, it's very premature to assume that she is incompetent or unable to handle the complexities of Trump's case.

                  1. Joiedevie profile image60
                    Joiedevieposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    The selection of this judge was randomized.  Florida court, criminal cases are assigned by the clerk on a “blind random basis.”  As far as her capabilities she was strongly rebuked twice by the court of appeals above her who overturned two of her rulings and wrote stinging opinions of her actions. 
                    The woman's bias toward Trump has been on full glaring display.  Bias? No, those are just the facts.

              2. peoplepower73 profile image90
                peoplepower73posted 11 months agoin reply to this

                This is from Former CIA official and George Mason University Hayden Center, Director Larry Pfeiffer.

                He broke down exactly the types of documents former President Donald Trump was hoarding in his Mar-a-Lago stash.

                THE CLASSIFIEDS DOCUMENTS THAT Donald Trump is charged with mishandling were marked “SECRET” or “TOP SECRET,” the highest classification we afford our nation’s secrets. By definition, the uncontrolled release of that information could be expected to cause “serious” or “exceptionally grave” damage (respectively) to our national security. As bad as that sounds, it gets worse: According to the indictment against Trump, eight of the TOP SECRET documents may have had information about or derived from so-called Special Access Programs (SAPs). The sensitivity of these documents was so great that prosecutors were obliged to redact even the codewords on the documents. The implication is that even publicly acknowledging the codenames of these projects, without discussing their operations at all, was deemed a great security risk.

                These included documents about the nuclear capabilities of another country, military attacks by a foreign country, the military capabilities of a foreign country, the timeline and details of an attack in a foreign country, the regional military activity of a foreign country, the military activity of foreign countries and the United States, and military activity in a foreign country.

                And as sensitive as the subjects of those documents are, what was really put at risk by our former commander-in-chief were the nation’s most sensitive activities and information derived from them.

                Broadly defined in Executive Order 13526, which governs classification, an SAP is “a program established for a specific class of classified information that imposes safeguarding and access requirements exceeding those normally required for information at the same classification level.” These are programs or activities so sensitive they require enhanced safeguards and the strictest access requirements. Even those who go through the arduous and sometimes years-long process of obtaining a Top Secret clearance often require additional security adjudication for to gain access to SAPs. Details of SAPs are usually limited to the bare minimum number of people with a “need to know.” Some are divided into several compartments with individuals given access only to those compartments requiring their expertise or knowledge; only a select few—a dozen or so, maybe fewer—might have access to the totality of the SAP.

                Unacknowledged SAPs are those whose existence and purpose require greater protection. All information is classified, and funding is classified, unacknowledged, and not directly linked to the program. Under extremely limited circumstances, the normal reporting requirements of an unacknowledged SAP can be “waived” by the Secretary of Defense. Congressional oversight in those cases would be limited to oral notifications to the chair, ranking members, and staff directors of the respective appropriations and armed services committees.

                To recap, of the 31 documents former President Trump is being charged with inappropriately storing at his resort hotel, eight may have contained information about or derived from our government’s most sensitive activities. In the wrong hands, the exposure of that information could risk the lives of U.S. and allied military and intelligence personnel, and foreign intelligence sources and their families—not to mention American civilians.

                It may be months or even years before a jury determines whether the former president is guilty. The president, his lawyers, and his political supporters will make legal arguments about the Espionage Act, the Atomic Energy Act, and the constitutional powers and privileges of the presidency. Some will be stronger than others in a purely legal sense. But ultimately they are independent of the more important consideration: Trump endangered our national security, putting us all at greater risk, and must be held accountable.

                1. Sharlee01 profile image88
                  Sharlee01posted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  I can agree, it could take a very long time before a verdict is handed down on Trump.  Sort of old news or news put on hold at this point.

                  So, what are your feelings in regard to the Top secret documents that lay around in Biden's garage, and insecure locations?

                  Was there a chance they were found and looked at by unscrupulous people?  Do you have some of the same concerns that Biden's unsecured documents were used in unscrupulous ways?

                  1. Joiedevie profile image60
                    Joiedevieposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    Joe gave back the documents when asked and even let FBI come in and search. Quite a different story with Trump. He hid them, move them around and told his lawyers that they were all given back when they weren't.

  2. Kathleen Cochran profile image76
    Kathleen Cochranposted 12 months ago

    It must be exhausting covering for Trump non-stop.

    Why is anyone associated with him automatically suspect?

    Might it have something to do with their behavior?

    1. wilderness profile image93
      wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Your question indicates why you do not understand as it clearly insinuates that everyone touched by Trump exhibits bad behavior.  Something that is obviously not true, yet you insinuate it is factual.

      1. peoplepower73 profile image90
        peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

        Wilderness: I never said everyone touched by Trump exhibits bad behavior. I pointed out that many who were part of Jan. 6 went to jail and are still being prosecuted because of Trump. That is not an insinuation that is a fact. The word "touch' is a gross generalization and can be interpreted many ways.

        Why do you minimize Trump's actions and exaggerate and conflate my comments. You tried to conflate the words insinuate with factual to mean everybody touched by Trump.

        1. wilderness profile image93
          wildernessposted 12 months agoin reply to this

          And I didn't say you did.  That comment was in reply to Kathleen, not you.

          1. peoplepower73 profile image90
            peoplepower73posted 12 months agoin reply to this

            Oops sorry.  But it still holds true about how you downplay Trump's actions.

  3. Kathleen Cochran profile image76
    Kathleen Cochranposted 11 months ago

    "It clearly insinuates that everyone touched by Trump exhibits bad behavior."

    Name some who haven't or didn't resign first.

  4. Kathleen Cochran profile image76
    Kathleen Cochranposted 11 months ago

    No takers? Allow me: Steven Mnuchin at Treasury, Sonny Perdue at Agriculture, Wilbur Ross at Commerce, Ben Carson at Housing and Urban Development, Elaine Chao at Transportation and Betsy DeVos at Education survived to the end of Trump's presidency without scandal.

    "Twelve of Donald Trump’s Senate-confirmed Cabinet members either resigned or were fired by the President.

    That’s a remarkable level of turnover for just one term. Trump’s immediate predecessors, Barack Obama and George W. Bush, saw just a handful of departures each in their first terms." - CNN

    "In all, 14 Trump aides, donors and advisers have been indicted or imprisoned since the days when the first-time candidate promised that he would only hire "the best people."

    Presidents are surrounded by tens of thousands of supporters and hire hundreds of aides into various jobs – so it may be inevitable that some tiny fraction of them will run afoul of the law. But experts say Trump is amassing a record unusual for an American president – in that so many senior advisers have come under legal scrutiny.

    The count includes senior members of Trump’s campaign staff, including former campaign chair Paul Manafort and his deputy, Rick Gates – both snared on financial misdeeds in special counsel Robert Mueller investigation. Trump’s first national security adviser – Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn – pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI – though he has recently moved to retract his plea. His personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, is under criminal investigation for his business relationship with two men arrested in an alleged campaign finance scheme, according to sources." ABC News

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/trump-a … d=68358219

  5. Kathleen Cochran profile image76
    Kathleen Cochranposted 11 months ago

    By the way, the most indicted administration in American history was Nixon, followed by Reagan - all GOP.

  6. Kathleen Cochran profile image76
    Kathleen Cochranposted 11 months ago
 
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