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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (9 posts)

What is the ideal age to get married? Is a 25 yr old in 2010 as mature as a 25 y

  1. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 7 years ago

    What is the ideal age to get married? Is a 25 yr old in 2010 as mature as a 25 yr old was in 1950?

    It seems in our society today the goal is to stay young in mind and body.
    60 is the new 50, 40 is the new 30, 30 is the new 20 and so on. Students graduating form college are coming out with $50k-$100k+ student loan debt, wages have not kept up with housing. A lot of adult children are taking longer to move out from their parents home,  select a career, or plan for the future.

  2. C.A. Johnson profile image69
    C.A. Johnsonposted 7 years ago

    When to get married is up to the individual. For some people younger is better while others need a little life behind them before tying the knot. Maturity also depends on the individual. I know people in their 50s that act like 12 years olds and teenagers that have had to grow up way faster than they should have.

    I do believe that if you are looking to get married that you should do it for love and not loneliness. You should have your own place and be your own person.

    When you choose to marry you are not only promising to share your life with somebody your are also promising to witness their life as they witness yours. You are choosing to acknowledge each others existence with all of the goods, the bads, the flaws, and the victories that are encompassed throughout the length of those lives.

  3. lindagoffigan profile image59
    lindagoffiganposted 7 years ago

    Maturity has not changed since Adam and Eve when it comes to mating.  The ideal age to get married is when it is legally allowed by the state of residence and the couple consider themselves mature enough to handle the responsibility to getting married for the long term.

    It is the social mores that changes with the socialization of society when speaking on what constitutes maturity.  For example, the new Credit Card Act indicated that no one under the age of 21 would be issued a credit card because the banks think that there will be irresponsible credit card usage.  The age for listing dependents who are in college on tax forms has been moved up to the age of twenty four.

    So there are many variants in society that denotes maturity according to the genre of the particular situation.  But for the most part, it is the maturity of the individuals when it is ripe for them to get married based on their life experiences and how they handle responsibility regardless of the social timeline, industry or government standards.

  4. prettydarkhorse profile image64
    prettydarkhorseposted 7 years ago

    Maturity depends on certain factors and age is one of it -- because of experience.
    There is no leverage on the age to get married but in the current situation today, people should think twice.

  5. mdlawyer profile image39
    mdlawyerposted 7 years ago

    The ideal age for a man 28-30 and for a woman 22-25.

  6. Kasshyde profile image53
    Kasshydeposted 7 years ago

    As somone who is in a parenting relationship that is still having growing pains, I would have to agree with the maturity depending on the individuals. Some rural couples may marry as young as 16 or 17 because it is what they know and they were raised to grow and mature with a partner. Sometimes marriage and childbirth forces someone to mature sooner than they would. And sometimes diving into a marraige exposes the flaws in individuals or couples not otherwise seen.  Can the partners grow and mature together or is single status better for self-realization and understanding?

    I've been told by several couples who had once complained about their spouses' flaws -which I thought would be bad enough to split over- that a marriage takes work, a lot of hard work, if you want it to last.

  7. tasksgirl profile image77
    tasksgirlposted 7 years ago

    It totally depends.  I am only 23 and my husband is 25 but we have already been married for 4 years, together for 10.  I've been working since age 17 and currently have a great stable career.  We own our own home (in Los Angeles no less!) and are expecting our first child.  This definitely wouldn't work for many people my age.  Most of my peers owe student loans as you said and are living at home with their parents once again.  I even work with people in their 30s who are still living with roommates and partying every night.  I struggled for quite a while in the beginning, but now I am very happy as I know that I will continue to be 10 steps ahead for the rest of my life.  I should be able to pay off my mortgage early, retire early, etc.

  8. profile image0
    vinsanityposted 7 years ago

    It all depends on the person. I know a few people that have been married at 18, and they are just fine. At the same time, I know people who should't get married until 30. I think that people are older than they used to be.

  9. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 6 years ago

    I staunchly believe that the 20s are a time for lifestyle exploration.   No one should marry in their 20s.  In the 1950s, people married in their 20s because of strict societal prohibitions against lifestyle and sexual exploration.   The 1950s were a very conservative time where there was only one legitimate lifestyle for young people- so-called wedded bliss.    This was rife especially in small towns.

    However, in big cities and bohemian enclaves,  young people in their 20s practiced a more liberal lifestyle.   They did not marry at that age but experimented with different and sexual lifestyles.    In such environments, early marriage was frowned upon as being unhip and traditional.     However, such young people were in the minority in the 1950s.

    To reiterate, the 20s are a time to explore life and career.   The 20s are not a time to get married.   The 20s are for living it up as you have never done before.  When a person is in their 20s, (hopefully) they are on their own and finding themselves.   Be alone for a couple of years to travel and act wild before marrying and settling down.   

    I believe in living life first and then get married.   The right age to get married is in the mid-30s after life is experienced to the full.  I might want to add that in the 1950s, those who have married young, were divorcing, acting  middle aged crazy, and having their second youth in the 1970s.    At least, this present generation is exploring every relationship and life option and when they do settle down, they have sown their wild oats and have no regrets like the 1950s generation did by marrying young.

 
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