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jump to last post 1-13 of 13 discussions (13 posts)

Are some age differences too much in relationships?

  1. peeples profile image95
    peeplesposted 6 years ago

    Are some age differences too much in relationships?

    I mean I know love is love, but what can a 40 year old possibly have in common with an 18 year old?

  2. luckykarma profile image60
    luckykarmaposted 6 years ago

    Well peeples, I suppose it's not what they have in 'common' in the relationship as much as what each person gets out of the other!.....a friend once said to me we all have a special friends who have the qualities that we lack in ourselves, and that is why we bond together. Each giving to each other that which we lack.

    So it may be that the younger person has a 'need' for a more mature person in a relationship to feel 'safe' and protected, maybe that person didn't have a good relationship with a parent, so they substitute. On the other hand, a 40 yr old can be very childish mentally and not see an 18yr old as a threat in anyway, they may have a great time together, as for the sexual side of things it won't matter how old the man is he will want sex to the day he dies! Women are different, they think of many things other than sex and are great at multi-tasking so their minds are filled with many things.  Age is irrelevant, if you both bond together and don't allow others to worry you.

  3. glmclendon profile image59
    glmclendonposted 6 years ago

    I think it is the matter of being able to relate. So much go into each relationship. I would not want my child with an older man. She at 18 and he at 40+ I don't  that is a good idea.

    Stay Well

  4. spartucusjones profile image93
    spartucusjonesposted 6 years ago

    I believe in the half your age plus seven equation. So if you are 40 the youngest you can go is 27. Otherwise it is a basic violation of math. You don't want the math gods mad at you.

  5. freecampingaussie profile image64
    freecampingaussieposted 6 years ago

    I am 47 & my husband is 64 & we have an amazing active time together ! The main thing is that you have a lot in common as we do .
    Keep in mind tho that when you are younger and want to start a family it is more ideal to be with someone near your age with the same goals as if you are both starting off together - having a first child etc  it will be easier for you .

  6. edhan profile image61
    edhanposted 6 years ago

    I believe age is not the factor but having the right vibe for each other will be the issue. If one can communicate with the other person and enjoy each other's company then I do not see any problem.

    I do see the relationship between two persons lies on communication. It really does not matter if you are at the same age, 1 year's difference or even 20 years' difference as if you do not communicate with each other, then there will not be a relationship.

    Having a relationship is to be able to communicate and keeping each other as companion in life.

  7. InterestCaptured profile image87
    InterestCapturedposted 6 years ago

    Don't date babies. Period. Its bad news bears.

  8. wychic profile image90
    wychicposted 6 years ago

    I personally believe that age differences are immaterial in whether or not a relationship will work. Maturity differences, however, can make or break that relationship. My husband and I met when I was 22 and he 49 -- now we have three kids together, are both work-at-home parents and spend the vast majority of our time together. However, such a relationship would probably not be possible if I'd been in a typical place for my age group at the time we met -- i.e. going to college, way too interested in partying, obsessed with drama, etc. Whether two people have two years' difference in age or thirty doesn't matter, but being at a similar level of maturity and with at least some common interests does.

  9. profile image0
    Hubert Williamsposted 6 years ago

    All I know on the subject is that when I was 28 I married a girl of 18. I mentioned Ed Sullivan once and she asked who Ed Sulivan was. We did not close the gap much farther in the year we were married. We live, and if we are lucky, we learn. I did. If you are too old to cut the mustard, leave the lid on the jar.

  10. nightwork4 profile image61
    nightwork4posted 6 years ago

    in most cases i would agree that and 18 year old and a 40 year old is a bit much but there are always exceptions. to me 10 to 15 years is about the most that would still be compatible but that's just my opinion.

  11. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 6 years ago

    Only the people involved can decide if age is a problem in their relationship. In all honesty most of the conversations we have with friends, co-workers, family, spouse, or significant others have nothing or very little to do with age perspective topics.
    Generally speaking the majority of conversations are about what was on TV last night, weather, traffic, something that happened at work, vacation plans, what you did over the weekend, relationship drama, worries, good news/bad news, or how someone feels.
    It's very rare people sit down and say, "Remember when... or Where were you when...?" This probably explains why younger and older co-workers are able to coexist and cultivate friendships. (When we like someone we tend to look more at what we have in common than what are differences are). An older and younger person might enjoy the same types of books, movies, restaurants/foods, hobbies, traveling, going to the beach, skiing and other outdoor activities. Also older people strive to look and feel younger while younger people often desire to prove they are smarter and more mature beyond their years. Personally speaking when I turned 18 I thought I was "grown" and considered myself to be "equal" to the adults.According to the legal system I was an adult and that was enough for me....etc I imagine most 18, 19, 20, and 21 year olds feel the same way.

    I suspect the major disadvantage to older and younger relationships is the health related ticking time bomb. For much of soicety the older we become the less active we are, the more medications we take, the higher risk of strokes and heart disease...etc A 40 year old with a 20 year old may not have any issues but if they stay together when they become 40 and 60 or 50 and 70 the odds are the younger person will either become a care giver or have to place older person in a nursing home. (Unless he/she is rich like Hugh Hefner, age 84 and datiing 24 year olds). :-)

  12. stricktlydating profile image82
    stricktlydatingposted 6 years ago

    When it comes to love age doesn't always matter to the two people who've fallen for eachother.  It doesn't mean it's going to last, but this is the same for anyone who falls in love.  Personally, when it comes to dating if the other person is around your parents age I think the age gap is too much (And it's kind of creepy).

  13. janikon profile image87
    janikonposted 6 years ago

    Celine Dion and her husband, that is the definition of too much of an age difference. I tend to believe if one half of the couple was already dying their gray hairs when the other was born ... too much!

 
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