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Is it better to do the right thing for the wrong reason or do the wrong thing fo

  1. Arachnea profile image78
    Arachneaposted 3 years ago

    Is it better to do the right thing for the wrong reason or do the wrong thing for the right reason.

    Sometimes life pitches a curve ball and we have to decide, make a hard decision. So, in the analysis process, is it better to do what you know is the right thing to do even if your reasons for doing so are wrong? Or, is it better to do the wrong thing for the right reason?

  2. Phyllis Doyle profile image98
    Phyllis Doyleposted 3 years ago

    Oh, boy! That is a tough one, Arachnea. It is almost like the glass of water question.  I thought hard about this and I think it is better to do the right thing for the wrong reason ... I think.

    Maybe it depends on who thinks it is the wrong reason. If it would be better to do the right thing for the sake of helping another, even though it may be the wrong reason for me, I would help that person.

    1. Arachnea profile image78
      Arachneaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. It is a tough question. It highlights the fact that life is grey in many areas, not black and white.

    2. dashingscorpio profile image89
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      However for the (individual) making the decision: when you see things in black and white you gain insight and when you see things in grey it causes you to delay. Knowing where (you) stand and being true to yourself leads to personal happiness.

  3. dashingscorpio profile image89
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    Oftentimes the notion of what is  "right" or "wrong" is arbitrary.
    More often than not it comes down to "agree" or "disagree" with what is best for that person or the situation. Everyone has their own moral compass.

    1. Arachnea profile image78
      Arachneaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      That's a good point, which adds another facet to the original question.

  4. C.V.Rajan profile image78
    C.V.Rajanposted 3 years ago

    When it comes to dharma (righteousness), both means and ends are to be right.

    You want to feed a hungry man. Right reason. You steal a loaf of bread from a shop and feed him. Wrong means. Not correct dharma.

    Your long term friend got hooked to drugs. He wants money from you and says it is not for drugs but to pay some bills. You take pity on him and give money. In the next one hour you see him lying in the corner of the road, fully drugged. This is doing the right thing for the wrong ends. You have not really helped him in any way.

    Hope it helps.

    1. Arachnea profile image78
      Arachneaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I think you have raised an interesting angle to consider. One's own rightness with things will definitely affect the rightness of any decision one makes.

  5. peachpurple profile image83
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    gee, that is hard nut to crack. I would rather do the right thing for the wrong reason. At least just being misunderstood for my good intentions

    1. Arachnea profile image78
      Arachneaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      peachpurple, I do believe that intentions are an important consideration in decision making.

  6. savvydating profile image96
    savvydatingposted 3 years ago

    I would have to ask, how is something right if your reasons are wrong? I would rather do a wrong thing for a right reason--like using deadly force to protect myself or my child from certain death. But that's an extreme example. In most scenarios, we can choose to do the right thing for the right reasons if we have any moral compass whatsoever, and morality is NOT arbitrary.Nevertheless, your question is interesting, and I see it has sparked some thoughtful comments.

  7. Scindhia H profile image71
    Scindhia Hposted 3 years ago

    I guess I would do the wrong thing for the right reason if the right reason concerns a greater good. This question made me think of some of the curve ball scenarios in the past and I have always ended up doing what is necessary for the end result. Situations demand different reactions and the most challenging task in this whole process is convincing ourselves about our actions. As long as no one is hurt seriously, it is fine. Even when we do the right thing for the right reasons, we might end up hurting somebody because their reasons are not aligned with us. Either ways it is tough.

 
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