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Omar Khayyam had the Right Idea

  1. Paraglider profile image89
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    Come, fill the Cup, and in the Fire of Spring
    The Winter Garment of Repentance fling:
    The Bird of Time has but a little way
    To fly---and Lo! the Bird is on the Wing.


    We are here for a short time. What is the use of wallowing in repentance? Especially in repentance of imaginary 'sins' that have harmed no-one.

    Time spent being miserable, or making others miserable, is time wasted. Instead of worrying about future things we cannot know anything about, we should enjoy ourselves, and each other, now.

    Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough,
    A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse---and Thou
    Beside me singing in the Wilderness---
    And Wilderness is Paradise enow.
    . . .
    Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
    Before we too into the Dust descend;
    Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,
    Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and---sans End!


    And to the many here that have told me - "you'll regret your unbelief when it's too late", I say, - you will regret your lost opportunities when it's too late. Enjoy life, with old Omar Khayyam.

    1. mohitmisra profile image54
      mohitmisraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

               "Zero is such a crazy concept,
      Aryabahatta taught man there is no need to regret."

      So true.smile

      1. Paraglider profile image89
        Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I don't know Arybahatta, but I like Omar Khayyam's philosophy.

        1. mohitmisra profile image54
          mohitmisraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Indian mathematician, saint, sage, philosopher considered the founder of the concept Zero. smile
          I like Omar Khayyam as well , he has a tendency to mix his alcohol with divine love. smile

          1. Paraglider profile image89
            Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Many interpretations of Omar Khayyam are possible smile

            1. mohitmisra profile image54
              mohitmisraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              True but I see divinity in his words. smile The essence of poetry. smile

              1. Paraglider profile image89
                Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Mohit - you see divinity everywhere wink I don't follow you there, but I do see the one-ness of the cosmos, with no evidence of personal gods built in man's image.

                1. mohitmisra profile image54
                  mohitmisraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  The oneness is divinity wink All are god images and not only man and then god has no image he is the Light with no beginning and no end , permeating everything smile

  2. maven101 profile image76
    maven101posted 8 years ago

    A philosophy I agree with wholeheartedly...

    When reading Omar I always wonder what he really wrote, before some of the rather awkward and forced rhyming was laid on...

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      From what I understand, he left over a thousand verses (in farsi) which were not all connected, though of course some were. Fitzgerald appears to have studied them and collated those that seemed to cohere best. Personally, I think his first version is inspired, and more poetic than his second.

      I think if you had to sum up his philosophy, "a caring hedonism laced with nihilism" would come fairly close. I like his outlook.

      Now, about that glass of wine...

  3. Ultimate Hubber profile image79
    Ultimate Hubberposted 8 years ago

    Heard of that great Persian poet a lot but never read him. I am glad you shared this great piece of poetry.

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Worth reading smile You can find the famous Fitzgerald translation here:
      http://www.armory.com/~thrace/ev/siir/Omar_Khayyam.html

      1. Ultimate Hubber profile image79
        Ultimate Hubberposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        THANX Para! smile

  4. tantrum profile image62
    tantrumposted 8 years ago

    Khayam, if you are intoxicated with wine, enjoy!
    If you are seated with a lover of thine, enjoy!
    In the end, the Void the whole world employ
    Imagine thou art not, while waiting in line, enjoy!

    To Enjoy is the clue, for a happy life.
    I'm an admirer of  Ommar Khayyam. Even Fitzgerald's verses are incredibly good, I prefer the tranlation from the original

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Enjoying life also prolongs life. Laughter and enthusiasm are rejuvenating forces.

      Can you read the original farsi? Or do you mean you prefer FitzG's original to his second version - I do too.

      1. tantrum profile image62
        tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          The translation from the original, I think it's his first translation. I don't have the book with me, because all my belongings were burnt in a fire.

        1. Paraglider profile image89
          Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          OK. In fact, it's still a selective translation, because the original doesn't really exist, except as a vast legacy of Omar's fragments. But FitsG did a brilliant job on it! Sorry to hear about the fire.

          1. tantrum profile image62
            tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Thanks ! I survived smile As I don't care for material things It wasn't that terrible. The only thing I regret  is That I lost all my paintings. All I've painted and draw during my entire life. I'm a painter and writer.

            1. Paraglider profile image89
              Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Rotten luck, just the same. I'm used to living without possessions because they are all in UK and I'm in Qatar, where I refuse to build an empire that I'd have to dismantle when I leave. Guitars though, I can't live without a guitar wink

              1. earnestshub profile image89
                earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Sorry you lost the paintings. I don't know what to say.... That is such a loss! I would feel that more than if I lost a Picasso!
                So personal...

                1. tantrum profile image62
                  tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  Thanks earnest for your words. Yeah , it was terrible when it happened (last year ) I try not to think about it. Life goes on smile

  5. tantrum profile image62
    tantrumposted 8 years ago

    Anxiously I began this course
    With life my awe grew even worse
    Unwillingly returned with force
    What was the point, I ask my source.


    lol smile

  6. Paraglider profile image89
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    You'll notice, in the standard Rubaiyat
    you start off with a couplet, just like that!
    and then you have a line that doesn't rhyme
    before you rhyme the last, to finish, pat wink

    But the serious point of posting this was that Omar Khayyam's philosophy of life is very hard to argue against. And I notice that so far no-one has tried?

    1. tantrum profile image62
      tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe Christians are at church big_smile

      1. Paraglider profile image89
        Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        No, they're too busy turning the humorous thread into a battleground wink

        1. tantrum profile image62
          tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          lol That as well lol  And two old ladies talking about art and crafts lol

  7. shamelabboush profile image66
    shamelabboushposted 8 years ago

    O friend, for the morrow let us not worry
    This moment we have now, let us not hurry
    When our time comes, we shall not tarry
    With seven thousand-year-olds, our burden carry.


    So wonderfully expressed...

  8. anjalichugh profile image82
    anjalichughposted 8 years ago

    We tend it understand the 'truth' and 'depth' in Khayyam's philosophy as we grow older. We tend to value fleeting moments as they slip through our fingers right in front of our eyes.

    1. tantrum profile image62
      tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Speak for yourself. I liked  and understood Khayyam since I was a teenager. Beauty and wit is not only for old people

      1. My Friend Shiyloh profile image56
        My Friend Shiylohposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        love is not old
        for this I am glad
        it's beauty matchless
        stories often told

  9. My Friend Shiyloh profile image56
    My Friend Shiylohposted 8 years ago

    that which is done in love never dies
    though many rise against it in vain
    love laughs at the enemies aligned
    sees the hatred of men and cries

  10. Paraglider profile image89
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    These four stanzas from the Rubaiyat seem particularly appropriate for the Religion Forum:


    Why, all the Saints and Sages who discuss'd
    Of the Two Worlds so learnedly, are thrust
    Like foolish Prophets forth; their Words to Scorn
    Are scatter'd, and their Mouths are stopt with Dust.
    . . .
    Oh, come with old Khayyam, and leave the Wise
    To talk; one thing is certain, that Life flies;
    One thing is certain, and the Rest is Lies;
    The Flower that once has blown for ever dies.
    . . .
    Myself when young did eagerly frequent
    Doctor and Saint, and heard great Argument
    About it and about: but evermore
    Came out by the same Door as in I went.
    . . .
    With them the Seed of Wisdom did I sow,
    And with my own hand labour'd it to grow:
    And this was all the Harvest that I reap'd---
    "I came like Water, and like Wind I go."

    Because, people, our only certainty is death. Whatever we may believe about afterlives and other worlds, is so much conjecture.

    But - a flask of wine, a loaf of bread, and Thou
    There's true comfort and peace there.

    1. earnestshub profile image89
      earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Beautiful and loving words. smile

      1. Paraglider profile image89
        Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Earnest - I think, when people accept the possibility that this life is all there is, that in turn opens the possibility of a true appreciation of it. And our so-called "hard-wired religiosity" is easily turned to serve poetry, art, music, or simply a love of life, love and good company.

        1. earnestshub profile image89
          earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I do agree with that. And what a wonderful way to respond these are! smile

  11. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    I just couldn't resist this! This old copy is one of my prized possessions.

    [The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ,
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit
    Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.]


    http://i882.photobucket.com/albums/ac30/shaluka/P9070015.jpg

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Shalini - that's probably the most famous stanza, or at least it's up there with "A flask of wine, a loaf of bread, and Thou". Why am I not surprised that you are also a lover of this great work? smile

    2. mohitmisra profile image54
      mohitmisraposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Cool words. smile The masters do have emotion and do cry. smile

  12. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    Thank you Paraglider smile

    I guard this copy with my life - but couldn't resist taking it out and posting a picture of that page!

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It looks like a very nice edition. Is it very old?

  13. My Friend Shiyloh profile image56
    My Friend Shiylohposted 8 years ago

    Love utters nothing in vain.
    So when you hear love, it remains forever with you.
    Love does have a voice, a sound, a tone.

    Silence is music ~ go study it.

    ~ Shiyloh ~

  14. Sufidreamer profile image81
    Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago

    Nice thread, Paraglider - a nice and civil appreciation of fine art and enjoying life.

    Most poetry passes me by, but even I love Omar - one of the many reasons that I want to visit Iran/Persia one day. It is many, many years since I read any of his work and I do plan to return to it.

    Have to work through a few more Greek dramatists, historians and philosophers, first smile

    Shalini: Beautiful book and a real treasure. Do you want to swap it for an authentic Greek copy of the Iliad (Circa 2006)? big_smile

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      And yet, The Rubaiyat can be read in FitzGerald's translation in the space of about 20 minutes - I'm sure you can find time enough for that smile

      1. Sufidreamer profile image81
        Sufidreamerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        No worries - found it on Gutenberg, so will have a read in the evening with a nice glass of Retsina big_smile

        1. Paraglider profile image89
          Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          That's the spirit. And here, two weeks into a dry Qatar Ramadan, the prospect of this week's trip to London & Amsterdam will come as a welcome relief smile I'm feeling like one of Omar's clay vessels:

          Then said another with a long-drawn Sigh,
          "My Clay with long oblivion is gone dry:
          "But, fill me with the old familiar Juice,
          "Methinks I might recover by-and-bye!"

  15. Amanda Severn profile image91
    Amanda Severnposted 8 years ago

    How very lovely to come onto a forum filled with poetry and civility. Makes a nice change!

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Agreed smile

  16. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    Not very old - 1954 - but well read smile

    Sufidreamer you wish big_smile

    It's got all 5 editions included and best of all, illustrations by Robert Stewart Sherriffs - the Punch illustrator who also did Marlowe's Tamburlaine. Couldn't resist a couple more smile

    http://i882.photobucket.com/albums/ac30/shaluka/P9070014.jpg   http://i882.photobucket.com/albums/ac30/shaluka/P9070012.jpg

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I notice it's open at FitzGerald's version 2 Rubaiyat (I think). Which makes me ask, are the illustrations also different?

  17. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    No Paraglider - he seems to have done them for all 5 together - there are 6 in all. This one is from the 5th edition. The 'moving finger' one is from the 1st.

    1. Paraglider profile image89
      Paragliderposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting. Mostly I've see (and own) copies of 1st & 2nd editions. I didn't even know he'd run to 5.

  18. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    I only know because they're all in here - the first is my favourite!

 
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