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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

How have you been successful in the past? Does it make you feel like a successfu

  1. donnaisabella profile image80
    donnaisabellaposted 6 years ago

    How have you been successful in the past? Does it make you feel like a successful person? Why not?

    I find people in this country to be generally very competitive in almost all areas of life. That is a good thing because it does drive people to do their best. The flip side is that we get so bogged in looking for those who are successful so we can identity with them and in the process ignore great potential and amazing skill or talent just because it is not in the spotlight. Nothing succeeds like success we say, but the truth is we make it so. A person writes a best seller, we want to read everything they write. Should we let the media and public opinion determine how successful we are?

  2. EuroCafeAuLait profile image84
    EuroCafeAuLaitposted 6 years ago

    Um, every day is another story.  Sure, past successes help give me confidence that I can rise to the occasion and overcome my current difficulties.  But each new struggle is just that - new.  Unknown territory can be bewildering.  Encouraging one's self, appreciating where we've been but  not getting bogged down, plus having the strategy of "one step forward everyday" is a good way to not let panic take control.  We are all heroes, winners and champions in one thing or another, and life continues to present new opportunities.  Let's go!

  3. grinnin1 profile image81
    grinnin1posted 6 years ago

    I'm not sure my idea of success is that of the mainstream. I feel successful as a person if my kids are happy, well adjusted, and thriving. I feel successful as an artist if I am happy with what I'm producing. I feel successful at church if I'm contributing. I think my idea of success is b.a.l.a.n.c.e.!   So I'm happy if my life is balanced, I'm doing my best as a mom and I'm working in an area I'm passionate about. If I made a armload of money doing what I'm passionate about, I would feel even more successful! Haven't experienced that sort of material success-  yet! But I know it's not the most important kind.

  4. smzclark profile image60
    smzclarkposted 6 years ago

    I only think that the media only decide on your success level if you let them. I've had endless amount of success's in the past. I'd probably start with when I took my first step---if I was to type them all...my answer would take hours to type and probably be too long for anyone to even consider reading!

  5. profile image0
    mcals71posted 6 years ago

    Success comes in all sizes and packages. It's something we all strive for, and it depends mostly on where we are coming from, the set of goals we set for ourselves, and the kind of odds that we are able to overcome, be they physical, mental, spiritual, artistic or financial. All considered, I feel that my life has been very successful. There are some things I could have done better, definitely, but my failures have taught me valuable lessons.

  6. MizBejabbers profile image92
    MizBejabbersposted 6 years ago

    If being successful means making a lot of money, I guess I haven't been successful in that light. However, I have had two careers in which I consider myself successful, broadcasting and legal editing. In broadcasting I worked as a disk jockey in a couple of medium-size markets, including Little Rock. It was said in the industry then that if you could make it in the Little Rock market, you could make it anywhere in the broadcasting world. I had my fans, so I guess you can say I had my 15 minutes of fame. I later was anchor-reporter for the regional network ARN. Reporters are a dime a dozen and most don't make it that far. My name was a household word in three states, but that was in the days when there wasn't much money paid for our success.
    In my career as a legal editor, for 10 years I was the only full-time non-attorney editor of our state law books. A lot of responsibility was riding on me. We expanded our editing staff a couple of years ago, and I am still depended on as a mentor and trainer. I don't make a wild amount of money, but I do make a good wage. But most of all, I consider myself successful because I have had two satisfying careers and have been very happy in them both. That is more important to me than a lot of money.

  7. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image59
    Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years ago

    That's a deep and complex question! I try to make a conscious decision every day to stay focused on what I consider my own personal definition of success to be, and I imagine that everyone has their own version of what they would consider success to be.

    As a society we are definitely geared toward some picture of success, in my opinion too often determined by the media and what others deem successful. I think people do this to gain acceptance, and also because success in and of itself is addicting and gives many people a sense of self worth, importance and belonging.

    I have always been one to look at the "why not?" side of things and side with the person who is not in the limelight but showing great character or potential versus the popular choice. I like to look for potential and possibilities and build on that rather than follow along with the crowd.

    I am not afraid to go against the flow for something I believe in. I don't put much stock in what some would consider indicators of success. I'm pretty unimpressed with the superficial indicators - I look deeper. And I have learned through life experience that how a person appears, the amount of formal education they have or amount of money they have has little bearing on my opinion of, and interest in the individual. It has no bearing on the respect I afford the person.

    Oh - and to answer your question - yes I have been successful in the past by a variety of measures. I don't think about being a "successful person." I don't rest on my successes. I keep putting one foot in front of the other. Like Kenny Rogers said in his song about the gambler, "There'll be time enough for countin' when the game is done."

  8. simosad1 profile image59
    simosad1posted 5 years ago

    wow hard question but i got the answer
    being successful in the past  makes me feel everyday like a successful person
    why?
    because i work hard
    now  after all
    i feel that i can be more successful in my life
    and do a lot of thing that i have never done

 
working